Limits...
Disrupted thalamic resting-state functional networks in schizophrenia.

Wang HL, Rau CL, Li YM, Chen YP, Yu R - Front Behav Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: The thalamus plays a key role in filtering or gating information and has extensive interconnectivity with other brain regions.In comparison with controls, patients exhibited enhance thalamic connectivity with bilateral precentral gyrus, dorsal medial frontal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, and lingual gyrus.Reduced thalamic connectivity in schizophrenia was found in bilateral superior frontal gyrus, anterior cingualte cortex, inferior parietal lobe, and cerebellum.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Special Education, National Taiwan Normal University Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
The thalamus plays a key role in filtering or gating information and has extensive interconnectivity with other brain regions. Recent studies provide evidence of thalamus abnormality in schizophrenia, but the resting functional networks of the thalamus in schizophrenia is still unclear. We characterize the thalamic resting-state networks (RSNs) in 72 patients with schizophrenia and 73 healthy controls, using a standard seed-based whole-brain correlation. In comparison with controls, patients exhibited enhance thalamic connectivity with bilateral precentral gyrus, dorsal medial frontal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, and lingual gyrus. Reduced thalamic connectivity in schizophrenia was found in bilateral superior frontal gyrus, anterior cingualte cortex, inferior parietal lobe, and cerebellum. Our findings question the "disconnectivity model" of schizophrenia by showing the over-connected thalamic network during resting state in schizophrenia and highlight the thalamus as a key hub in the schizophrenic network abnormality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Abnormal FC associated with the thalamus in schizophrenia. Hot color represents higher FC with thalamus in schizophrenia, whereas blue cold color represents lower FC in schizophrenia. Images are in radiologic format with subject left on image right.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4340165&req=5

Figure 2: Abnormal FC associated with the thalamus in schizophrenia. Hot color represents higher FC with thalamus in schizophrenia, whereas blue cold color represents lower FC in schizophrenia. Images are in radiologic format with subject left on image right.

Mentions: Group analyses revealed that schizophrenia patients exhibited reduced thalamus-based FC with bilateral superior frontal gyrus, anterior cingualte cortex, inferior parietal lobe, and cerebellum. Patients also showed increased thalamus-based FC with bilateral precentral gyrus, dorsal medial frontal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, and lingual gyrus (see Table 3; Figure 2). There was no significant interaction between group and hemisphere.


Disrupted thalamic resting-state functional networks in schizophrenia.

Wang HL, Rau CL, Li YM, Chen YP, Yu R - Front Behav Neurosci (2015)

Abnormal FC associated with the thalamus in schizophrenia. Hot color represents higher FC with thalamus in schizophrenia, whereas blue cold color represents lower FC in schizophrenia. Images are in radiologic format with subject left on image right.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4340165&req=5

Figure 2: Abnormal FC associated with the thalamus in schizophrenia. Hot color represents higher FC with thalamus in schizophrenia, whereas blue cold color represents lower FC in schizophrenia. Images are in radiologic format with subject left on image right.
Mentions: Group analyses revealed that schizophrenia patients exhibited reduced thalamus-based FC with bilateral superior frontal gyrus, anterior cingualte cortex, inferior parietal lobe, and cerebellum. Patients also showed increased thalamus-based FC with bilateral precentral gyrus, dorsal medial frontal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, and lingual gyrus (see Table 3; Figure 2). There was no significant interaction between group and hemisphere.

Bottom Line: The thalamus plays a key role in filtering or gating information and has extensive interconnectivity with other brain regions.In comparison with controls, patients exhibited enhance thalamic connectivity with bilateral precentral gyrus, dorsal medial frontal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, and lingual gyrus.Reduced thalamic connectivity in schizophrenia was found in bilateral superior frontal gyrus, anterior cingualte cortex, inferior parietal lobe, and cerebellum.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Special Education, National Taiwan Normal University Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
The thalamus plays a key role in filtering or gating information and has extensive interconnectivity with other brain regions. Recent studies provide evidence of thalamus abnormality in schizophrenia, but the resting functional networks of the thalamus in schizophrenia is still unclear. We characterize the thalamic resting-state networks (RSNs) in 72 patients with schizophrenia and 73 healthy controls, using a standard seed-based whole-brain correlation. In comparison with controls, patients exhibited enhance thalamic connectivity with bilateral precentral gyrus, dorsal medial frontal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, and lingual gyrus. Reduced thalamic connectivity in schizophrenia was found in bilateral superior frontal gyrus, anterior cingualte cortex, inferior parietal lobe, and cerebellum. Our findings question the "disconnectivity model" of schizophrenia by showing the over-connected thalamic network during resting state in schizophrenia and highlight the thalamus as a key hub in the schizophrenic network abnormality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus