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Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging.

Krupa K, Bekiesińska-Figatowska M - Pol J Radiol (2015)

Bottom Line: An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen.Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned.Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Institute of Mother and Child, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient's body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients' bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Vertebroplasty after Th12 fracture. STIR, sag (A), FSE/T1, sag (B).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4340093&req=5

f19-poljradiol-80-93: Vertebroplasty after Th12 fracture. STIR, sag (A), FSE/T1, sag (B).

Mentions: Image-guided application of cement for kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty results in the presence of low signal intensity material in the treated vertebral body in all sequences and does not produce artifacts (Figure 19).


Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging.

Krupa K, Bekiesińska-Figatowska M - Pol J Radiol (2015)

Vertebroplasty after Th12 fracture. STIR, sag (A), FSE/T1, sag (B).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4340093&req=5

f19-poljradiol-80-93: Vertebroplasty after Th12 fracture. STIR, sag (A), FSE/T1, sag (B).
Mentions: Image-guided application of cement for kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty results in the presence of low signal intensity material in the treated vertebral body in all sequences and does not produce artifacts (Figure 19).

Bottom Line: An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen.Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned.Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Institute of Mother and Child, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient's body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients' bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus