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Impaired neutrophil directional chemotactic accuracy in chronic periodontitis patients.

Roberts HM, Ling MR, Insall R, Kalna G, Spengler J, Grant MM, Chapple IL - J. Clin. Periodontol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Circular statistics were utilized for the analysis of cell movement.However, velocity and accuracy were normalized for the weak chemoattractant CXCL8 while they remained significantly reduced for fMLP.Dysfunctional neutrophil chemotaxis may predispose patients with periodontitis to their disease by increasing tissue transit times, thus exacerbating neutrophil-mediated collateral host tissue damage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Periodontal Research Group and MRC Centre for Immune Regulation, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Analysis of post-treatment results: as described in Fig. 5.
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fig06: Analysis of post-treatment results: as described in Fig. 5.

Mentions: Statistical analyses of these data (Figs 5 and 6) demonstrate that before treatment, neutrophils from patients with periodontitis have significantly lower speed, velocity and directional accuracy (chemotactic index and resultant vector length) than neutrophils from healthy controls for both chemoattractants, CXCL8 and fMLP. Following treatment, they still display significantly reduced speed, velocity and accuracy than neutrophils from healthy control volunteers for fMLP; however, with the exception of speed, the neutrophils from patients with periodontitis were not significantly different in their response to CXCL8 following therapy, in comparison to neutrophils from healthy volunteers. Patient and control pre- and post-treatment results were analysed separately because of the high inter-individual variation that arises when neutrophils are analysed on different days. Therefore, patient and control cells were analysed synchronously at both baseline and then again simultaneously following therapy, but no attempt was made to compare patients’ cells pre- and post-treatment (or controls).


Impaired neutrophil directional chemotactic accuracy in chronic periodontitis patients.

Roberts HM, Ling MR, Insall R, Kalna G, Spengler J, Grant MM, Chapple IL - J. Clin. Periodontol. (2015)

Analysis of post-treatment results: as described in Fig. 5.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4340045&req=5

fig06: Analysis of post-treatment results: as described in Fig. 5.
Mentions: Statistical analyses of these data (Figs 5 and 6) demonstrate that before treatment, neutrophils from patients with periodontitis have significantly lower speed, velocity and directional accuracy (chemotactic index and resultant vector length) than neutrophils from healthy controls for both chemoattractants, CXCL8 and fMLP. Following treatment, they still display significantly reduced speed, velocity and accuracy than neutrophils from healthy control volunteers for fMLP; however, with the exception of speed, the neutrophils from patients with periodontitis were not significantly different in their response to CXCL8 following therapy, in comparison to neutrophils from healthy volunteers. Patient and control pre- and post-treatment results were analysed separately because of the high inter-individual variation that arises when neutrophils are analysed on different days. Therefore, patient and control cells were analysed synchronously at both baseline and then again simultaneously following therapy, but no attempt was made to compare patients’ cells pre- and post-treatment (or controls).

Bottom Line: Circular statistics were utilized for the analysis of cell movement.However, velocity and accuracy were normalized for the weak chemoattractant CXCL8 while they remained significantly reduced for fMLP.Dysfunctional neutrophil chemotaxis may predispose patients with periodontitis to their disease by increasing tissue transit times, thus exacerbating neutrophil-mediated collateral host tissue damage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Periodontal Research Group and MRC Centre for Immune Regulation, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus