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A case of Hepatitis E in a blood donor.

Tendulkar AA, Shah SA, Kelkar RA - Asian J Transfus Sci (2015 Jan-Jun)

Bottom Line: HEV IgM antibody by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was positive.Silent infections may be lurking in apparently healthy donors.Donors need to be encouraged to revert in case of any significant developments after donation and maintain open channels of communication.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Transfusion Medicine, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
The threat of hepatitis E is being felt in blood banks in recent times. The disease is usually self-limiting, but may progress to a fulminant fatal form. We report a unique case of a hepatitis E virus (HEV)-positive asymptomatic blood donor who later developed jaundice and informed the blood bank. A blood donor passed all eligibility criteria tests and donated blood. After 20 days, the blood bank was informed by the donor that he had developed vomiting and jaundice 1 day postdonation. He was investigated by a local laboratory 1 day postdonation for liver profile, which was high. There had been a major outbreak in his community of similar symptoms during the same period. HEV IgM antibody by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was positive. Silent infections may be lurking in apparently healthy donors. Donors need to be encouraged to revert in case of any significant developments after donation and maintain open channels of communication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Geographic distribution of hepatitis E infection (2010) (Teo, Chong-Gee, Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, 2012 Yellow Book)
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Figure 1: Geographic distribution of hepatitis E infection (2010) (Teo, Chong-Gee, Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, 2012 Yellow Book)

Mentions: There are widespread endemic zones of hepatitis E [Figure 1]. HEV seroprevalence in blood donors reported from various countries ranges from 1% to 52% [Table 3].


A case of Hepatitis E in a blood donor.

Tendulkar AA, Shah SA, Kelkar RA - Asian J Transfus Sci (2015 Jan-Jun)

Geographic distribution of hepatitis E infection (2010) (Teo, Chong-Gee, Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, 2012 Yellow Book)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4339940&req=5

Figure 1: Geographic distribution of hepatitis E infection (2010) (Teo, Chong-Gee, Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, 2012 Yellow Book)
Mentions: There are widespread endemic zones of hepatitis E [Figure 1]. HEV seroprevalence in blood donors reported from various countries ranges from 1% to 52% [Table 3].

Bottom Line: HEV IgM antibody by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was positive.Silent infections may be lurking in apparently healthy donors.Donors need to be encouraged to revert in case of any significant developments after donation and maintain open channels of communication.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Transfusion Medicine, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
The threat of hepatitis E is being felt in blood banks in recent times. The disease is usually self-limiting, but may progress to a fulminant fatal form. We report a unique case of a hepatitis E virus (HEV)-positive asymptomatic blood donor who later developed jaundice and informed the blood bank. A blood donor passed all eligibility criteria tests and donated blood. After 20 days, the blood bank was informed by the donor that he had developed vomiting and jaundice 1 day postdonation. He was investigated by a local laboratory 1 day postdonation for liver profile, which was high. There had been a major outbreak in his community of similar symptoms during the same period. HEV IgM antibody by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was positive. Silent infections may be lurking in apparently healthy donors. Donors need to be encouraged to revert in case of any significant developments after donation and maintain open channels of communication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus