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An exhaustive inventory of coniferous trees in an agricultural landscape.

Rousselet J, Roques A, Garcia J, Rossi JP - Biodivers Data J (2015)

Bottom Line: Various species of forest trees are commonly used for ornamental purposes and are therefore frequently found in non-forest ecosystems.These trees constitute a significant component of the trees outside forests (TOF).We provide the spatial coordinates of the points without differentiation between tree species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INRA, UR633 Zoologie Forestière, Orléans, France.

ABSTRACT

Background: Various species of forest trees are commonly used for ornamental purposes and are therefore frequently found in non-forest ecosystems. These trees constitute a significant component of the trees outside forests (TOF). Although increasingly recognized as prominent feature of agricultural lands and built-up areas, not much is known, however, about TOF since they are generally absent from forest inventories.

New information: In the present study, we focus on the coniferous tree species that constitute potential hosts for a forest defoliator, the pine processionary moth Thaumetopoeapityocampa Den. & Schiff. (Lepidoptera, Notodontidae). We carried out an exhaustive inventory of all pines (Pinus spp.), cedars (Cedrus spp.) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugamenziesii) in a 22 × 22 km study window located in the open-field region of Beauce in the centre of France. We recorded a total of 3834 individuals or small groups host trees corresponding a density of 7.9 occurrences per 100 ha. We provide the spatial coordinates of the points without differentiation between tree species.

No MeSH data available.


Survey plot (22 × 22 km) where an exhaustive inventory of all trees belonging to the genera Pinus, Cedrus and Pseudotsuga was carried during autumn and winter 2009–2010. Trees are indicated by crosses.
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Figure 1223161: Survey plot (22 × 22 km) where an exhaustive inventory of all trees belonging to the genera Pinus, Cedrus and Pseudotsuga was carried during autumn and winter 2009–2010. Trees are indicated by crosses.

Mentions: In the present study, we focus on the coniferous tree species that are potential hosts for a forest defoliator, the pine processionary moth Thaumetopoeapityocampa Den. & Schiff. (Lepidoptera, Notodontidae) (thereafter referred to as PPM). T.pityocampa feeds on pines (Pinus spp.), cedars (Cedrus spp.), and occasionally on Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugamenziesii) (Cielsa 2011, Roques 2015). The aim of the present survey was to carry out an exhaustive inventory of TOF constituting suitable hosts for the PPM in a 22 × 22 km study window located in the open-field region of Beauce in the centre of France (Fig. 1). Single trees, linear groups of trees and small woodlands were identified and geolocalized, and the resulting data set can be used to assess tree spatial pattern or their contribution to important landscape features (e.g. connectivity) with regards to forest organisms such as the PPM.


An exhaustive inventory of coniferous trees in an agricultural landscape.

Rousselet J, Roques A, Garcia J, Rossi JP - Biodivers Data J (2015)

Survey plot (22 × 22 km) where an exhaustive inventory of all trees belonging to the genera Pinus, Cedrus and Pseudotsuga was carried during autumn and winter 2009–2010. Trees are indicated by crosses.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4339812&req=5

Figure 1223161: Survey plot (22 × 22 km) where an exhaustive inventory of all trees belonging to the genera Pinus, Cedrus and Pseudotsuga was carried during autumn and winter 2009–2010. Trees are indicated by crosses.
Mentions: In the present study, we focus on the coniferous tree species that are potential hosts for a forest defoliator, the pine processionary moth Thaumetopoeapityocampa Den. & Schiff. (Lepidoptera, Notodontidae) (thereafter referred to as PPM). T.pityocampa feeds on pines (Pinus spp.), cedars (Cedrus spp.), and occasionally on Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugamenziesii) (Cielsa 2011, Roques 2015). The aim of the present survey was to carry out an exhaustive inventory of TOF constituting suitable hosts for the PPM in a 22 × 22 km study window located in the open-field region of Beauce in the centre of France (Fig. 1). Single trees, linear groups of trees and small woodlands were identified and geolocalized, and the resulting data set can be used to assess tree spatial pattern or their contribution to important landscape features (e.g. connectivity) with regards to forest organisms such as the PPM.

Bottom Line: Various species of forest trees are commonly used for ornamental purposes and are therefore frequently found in non-forest ecosystems.These trees constitute a significant component of the trees outside forests (TOF).We provide the spatial coordinates of the points without differentiation between tree species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INRA, UR633 Zoologie Forestière, Orléans, France.

ABSTRACT

Background: Various species of forest trees are commonly used for ornamental purposes and are therefore frequently found in non-forest ecosystems. These trees constitute a significant component of the trees outside forests (TOF). Although increasingly recognized as prominent feature of agricultural lands and built-up areas, not much is known, however, about TOF since they are generally absent from forest inventories.

New information: In the present study, we focus on the coniferous tree species that constitute potential hosts for a forest defoliator, the pine processionary moth Thaumetopoeapityocampa Den. & Schiff. (Lepidoptera, Notodontidae). We carried out an exhaustive inventory of all pines (Pinus spp.), cedars (Cedrus spp.) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugamenziesii) in a 22 × 22 km study window located in the open-field region of Beauce in the centre of France. We recorded a total of 3834 individuals or small groups host trees corresponding a density of 7.9 occurrences per 100 ha. We provide the spatial coordinates of the points without differentiation between tree species.

No MeSH data available.