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Yang/Qi invigoration: an herbal therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome with yang deficiency?

Leong PK, Wong HS, Chen J, Ko KM - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Bottom Line: According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory, Yang and Qi are driving forces of biological activities in the human body.Based on the crucial role of the mitochondrion in energy metabolism, we propose an extended view of Yang and Qi in the context of mitochondrion-driven cellular and body function.By virtue of their ability to enhance mitochondrial function and its regulation, Yang- and Qi-invigorating tonic herbs, such as Cistanches Herba and Schisandrae Fructus, may therefore prove to be beneficial in the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome with Yang deficiency.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Life Science, The Hong Kong University of Science & Technology, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT
According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory, Yang and Qi are driving forces of biological activities in the human body. Based on the crucial role of the mitochondrion in energy metabolism, we propose an extended view of Yang and Qi in the context of mitochondrion-driven cellular and body function. It is of interest that the clinical manifestations of Yang/Qi deficiencies in TCM resemble those of chronic fatigue syndrome in Western medicine, which is pathologically associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. By virtue of their ability to enhance mitochondrial function and its regulation, Yang- and Qi-invigorating tonic herbs, such as Cistanches Herba and Schisandrae Fructus, may therefore prove to be beneficial in the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome with Yang deficiency.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Biochemical and physiological basis of Qi function.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Biochemical and physiological basis of Qi function.

Mentions: TCM theory states that the interaction between Yin and Yang generates Qi. Qi refers to the refined and nutritive substances flowing in the body as well as the functional status of organs and tissues. Within this framework, the complete deprivation of Qi signifies death in TCM [5]. To provide vital energy for supporting life activities, Qi flows through the meridians and nourishes the organs. With regard to the role of Qi in modulating physiological functions, Qi can be subcategorized into three functionally related types, namely, primordial Qi, pectoral Qi, and normal Qi, with the latter being subdivided into nutritive Qi and defensive Qi (Figure 1) [5]. In essence, primordial Qi which is also known as “congenital essence of the kidney” is inherited from parents and is responsible for stimulating growth and development, as well as invigorating the vital activities of organs in the body; that is, it is Yang in nature. Pectoral Qi is comprised of the “natural air” inhaled by the lungs and the “grain Qi” transformed from food and water by the spleen and stomach; that is, it is Yin in nature. The principal actions of pectoral Qi are to facilitate gas exchange in the lungs and regulate blood circulation in the heart as well as its rate of beating. Primordial Qi combines with pectoral Qi to form normal Qi (also called Zheng Qi in Chinese), which circulates in the body for supporting various body functions. The interrelationship between primordial Qi and pectoral Qi is consistent with the notion that Qi (or normal Qi) arises from an interaction between Yin and Yang. Normal Qi (generally referred to as Qi hereafter) manifests as two functions, namely, nutritive Qi and defensive Qi. While nutritive Qi nourishes the internal organs to sustain the physiological functions of the body, defensive Qi protects the body against disease-causing internal (inflammation and cancer) and external (bacteria and viruses) factors.


Yang/Qi invigoration: an herbal therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome with yang deficiency?

Leong PK, Wong HS, Chen J, Ko KM - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Biochemical and physiological basis of Qi function.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4339790&req=5

fig1: Biochemical and physiological basis of Qi function.
Mentions: TCM theory states that the interaction between Yin and Yang generates Qi. Qi refers to the refined and nutritive substances flowing in the body as well as the functional status of organs and tissues. Within this framework, the complete deprivation of Qi signifies death in TCM [5]. To provide vital energy for supporting life activities, Qi flows through the meridians and nourishes the organs. With regard to the role of Qi in modulating physiological functions, Qi can be subcategorized into three functionally related types, namely, primordial Qi, pectoral Qi, and normal Qi, with the latter being subdivided into nutritive Qi and defensive Qi (Figure 1) [5]. In essence, primordial Qi which is also known as “congenital essence of the kidney” is inherited from parents and is responsible for stimulating growth and development, as well as invigorating the vital activities of organs in the body; that is, it is Yang in nature. Pectoral Qi is comprised of the “natural air” inhaled by the lungs and the “grain Qi” transformed from food and water by the spleen and stomach; that is, it is Yin in nature. The principal actions of pectoral Qi are to facilitate gas exchange in the lungs and regulate blood circulation in the heart as well as its rate of beating. Primordial Qi combines with pectoral Qi to form normal Qi (also called Zheng Qi in Chinese), which circulates in the body for supporting various body functions. The interrelationship between primordial Qi and pectoral Qi is consistent with the notion that Qi (or normal Qi) arises from an interaction between Yin and Yang. Normal Qi (generally referred to as Qi hereafter) manifests as two functions, namely, nutritive Qi and defensive Qi. While nutritive Qi nourishes the internal organs to sustain the physiological functions of the body, defensive Qi protects the body against disease-causing internal (inflammation and cancer) and external (bacteria and viruses) factors.

Bottom Line: According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory, Yang and Qi are driving forces of biological activities in the human body.Based on the crucial role of the mitochondrion in energy metabolism, we propose an extended view of Yang and Qi in the context of mitochondrion-driven cellular and body function.By virtue of their ability to enhance mitochondrial function and its regulation, Yang- and Qi-invigorating tonic herbs, such as Cistanches Herba and Schisandrae Fructus, may therefore prove to be beneficial in the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome with Yang deficiency.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Life Science, The Hong Kong University of Science & Technology, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT
According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory, Yang and Qi are driving forces of biological activities in the human body. Based on the crucial role of the mitochondrion in energy metabolism, we propose an extended view of Yang and Qi in the context of mitochondrion-driven cellular and body function. It is of interest that the clinical manifestations of Yang/Qi deficiencies in TCM resemble those of chronic fatigue syndrome in Western medicine, which is pathologically associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. By virtue of their ability to enhance mitochondrial function and its regulation, Yang- and Qi-invigorating tonic herbs, such as Cistanches Herba and Schisandrae Fructus, may therefore prove to be beneficial in the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome with Yang deficiency.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus