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How do disease perception, treatment features, and dermatologist-patient relationship impact on patients assuming topical treatment? An Italian survey.

Burroni AG, Fassino M, Torti A, Visentin E - Patient Relat Outcome Meas (2015)

Bottom Line: Topical therapy is the most widely used treatment, even though it is not considered the most effective one and often perceived to be cosmetic.The main findings are: 1) inadequate patient education about this disease, 2) lack of information about topical treatment, and 3) lack of results within the expected time frame.This survey adds new and important details about daily life and well-being and the needs of psoriatic patients, providing suggestions for dermatologists to improve patients management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: IRCCS University Hospital San Martino, IST National Institute for Cancer Research, Genoa, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Background: Psoriasis largely affects daily activities and social interactions and has a strong impact on patients' quality of life. Psoriatic patients have different attitudes toward their condition. Topical medications are essential for the treatment of psoriasis, but the majority of patients do not adhere to these therapies.

Objective: The history of treatment success or failure seems to influence patient attitude toward topical therapy. Therefore, it is important to understand the psychological, experiential, and motivational aspects that could be critical for treatment adherence, and to describe the different attitudes toward topical treatment. Furthermore, the physician-patient relationship and the willingness to trust the dermatologist may have a substantial role in encouraging or discouraging patients' attitudes toward topical therapy.

Methods: A survey was designed to collect aspects that could be relevant to understanding different patient attitudes toward psoriasis and its treatments. A total of 495 self-administered questionnaires compiled by psoriatic patients were analyzed from 20 Italian specialized hospital centers in order to provide a nationwide picture.

Results: Psoriatic patients have different perceptions and experiences in relation to their condition: half of them consider psoriasis as a disease, while the other half consider psoriasis as a disorder or a nuisance. Topical therapy is the most widely used treatment, even though it is not considered the most effective one and often perceived to be cosmetic. The main findings are: 1) inadequate patient education about this disease, 2) lack of information about topical treatment, and 3) lack of results within the expected time frame. Furthermore, physicians need to build a good relationship with psoriatic patients in order to motivate them, to trust in their care, and to adhere to treatment.

Conclusion: This survey adds new and important details about daily life and well-being and the needs of psoriatic patients, providing suggestions for dermatologists to improve patients management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Results to the question “Indicate the level of discomfort that you feel by having psoriasis in each of these areas.”Note: Rating on a scale from 1 to 10, where 1 means no discomfort and 10 extreme discomfort.
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f4-prom-6-009: Results to the question “Indicate the level of discomfort that you feel by having psoriasis in each of these areas.”Note: Rating on a scale from 1 to 10, where 1 means no discomfort and 10 extreme discomfort.

Mentions: Figure 4 indicates the level of discomfort (on a rating scale from 1 to 10) perceived by patients, depending on the area involved by psoriasis; the highest scores are associated with highly exposed body parts (face, hands, scalp) or genitals, while less discomfort is attributed to other parts with lower visibility.


How do disease perception, treatment features, and dermatologist-patient relationship impact on patients assuming topical treatment? An Italian survey.

Burroni AG, Fassino M, Torti A, Visentin E - Patient Relat Outcome Meas (2015)

Results to the question “Indicate the level of discomfort that you feel by having psoriasis in each of these areas.”Note: Rating on a scale from 1 to 10, where 1 means no discomfort and 10 extreme discomfort.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4337690&req=5

f4-prom-6-009: Results to the question “Indicate the level of discomfort that you feel by having psoriasis in each of these areas.”Note: Rating on a scale from 1 to 10, where 1 means no discomfort and 10 extreme discomfort.
Mentions: Figure 4 indicates the level of discomfort (on a rating scale from 1 to 10) perceived by patients, depending on the area involved by psoriasis; the highest scores are associated with highly exposed body parts (face, hands, scalp) or genitals, while less discomfort is attributed to other parts with lower visibility.

Bottom Line: Topical therapy is the most widely used treatment, even though it is not considered the most effective one and often perceived to be cosmetic.The main findings are: 1) inadequate patient education about this disease, 2) lack of information about topical treatment, and 3) lack of results within the expected time frame.This survey adds new and important details about daily life and well-being and the needs of psoriatic patients, providing suggestions for dermatologists to improve patients management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: IRCCS University Hospital San Martino, IST National Institute for Cancer Research, Genoa, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Background: Psoriasis largely affects daily activities and social interactions and has a strong impact on patients' quality of life. Psoriatic patients have different attitudes toward their condition. Topical medications are essential for the treatment of psoriasis, but the majority of patients do not adhere to these therapies.

Objective: The history of treatment success or failure seems to influence patient attitude toward topical therapy. Therefore, it is important to understand the psychological, experiential, and motivational aspects that could be critical for treatment adherence, and to describe the different attitudes toward topical treatment. Furthermore, the physician-patient relationship and the willingness to trust the dermatologist may have a substantial role in encouraging or discouraging patients' attitudes toward topical therapy.

Methods: A survey was designed to collect aspects that could be relevant to understanding different patient attitudes toward psoriasis and its treatments. A total of 495 self-administered questionnaires compiled by psoriatic patients were analyzed from 20 Italian specialized hospital centers in order to provide a nationwide picture.

Results: Psoriatic patients have different perceptions and experiences in relation to their condition: half of them consider psoriasis as a disease, while the other half consider psoriasis as a disorder or a nuisance. Topical therapy is the most widely used treatment, even though it is not considered the most effective one and often perceived to be cosmetic. The main findings are: 1) inadequate patient education about this disease, 2) lack of information about topical treatment, and 3) lack of results within the expected time frame. Furthermore, physicians need to build a good relationship with psoriatic patients in order to motivate them, to trust in their care, and to adhere to treatment.

Conclusion: This survey adds new and important details about daily life and well-being and the needs of psoriatic patients, providing suggestions for dermatologists to improve patients management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus