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Parathyroid adenoma in a young female presenting as recurrent acute pancreatitis with a brown tumour of the mandible-A case study.

Kunte AR, Dube VS, Balwantkar SS, Kulkarni KK - Int J Surg Case Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: Primary hyperparathyroidism is usually seen in females above the age of 50 years, with a prevalence of 21/1000,(1) whereas the incidence in patients aged 12-28 years is less than 5%.(2) A solitary adenoma is responsible for 80% of cases of primary hyperparathyroidism.(3) Primary hyperparathyroidism is most commonly asymptomatic.(4) The incidence of acute pancreatitis associated with hyperparathyroidism is less than 10%.(5,6) The incidence of hyperparathyroidism associated with a Brown tumour is less than 5%.(7) PRESENTATION OF CASE: A 19 year old female patient presented with recurrent acute pancreatitis and swelling over the mandible.The patient was initially managed as a case of acute pancreatitis, and although not suspected initially, a high index of suspicion for hyperparathyroidism developed after a biopsy of the mandibular swelling showed the presence of osteoclastic giant cells indicating the possibility of a Brown tumour.The young age of the patient, and her presentation with acute pancreatitis and a Brown tumour of the mandible make this an extremely rare presentation of parathyroid adenoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: General Surgical residency, B. J. Medical College and Sassoon General Hospitals, Pune, India. Electronic address: a.kunte13@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Healed surgical scar of the patient on the 12th post-operative day.
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fig0065: Healed surgical scar of the patient on the 12th post-operative day.


Parathyroid adenoma in a young female presenting as recurrent acute pancreatitis with a brown tumour of the mandible-A case study.

Kunte AR, Dube VS, Balwantkar SS, Kulkarni KK - Int J Surg Case Rep (2014)

Healed surgical scar of the patient on the 12th post-operative day.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4336398&req=5

fig0065: Healed surgical scar of the patient on the 12th post-operative day.
Bottom Line: Primary hyperparathyroidism is usually seen in females above the age of 50 years, with a prevalence of 21/1000,(1) whereas the incidence in patients aged 12-28 years is less than 5%.(2) A solitary adenoma is responsible for 80% of cases of primary hyperparathyroidism.(3) Primary hyperparathyroidism is most commonly asymptomatic.(4) The incidence of acute pancreatitis associated with hyperparathyroidism is less than 10%.(5,6) The incidence of hyperparathyroidism associated with a Brown tumour is less than 5%.(7) PRESENTATION OF CASE: A 19 year old female patient presented with recurrent acute pancreatitis and swelling over the mandible.The patient was initially managed as a case of acute pancreatitis, and although not suspected initially, a high index of suspicion for hyperparathyroidism developed after a biopsy of the mandibular swelling showed the presence of osteoclastic giant cells indicating the possibility of a Brown tumour.The young age of the patient, and her presentation with acute pancreatitis and a Brown tumour of the mandible make this an extremely rare presentation of parathyroid adenoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: General Surgical residency, B. J. Medical College and Sassoon General Hospitals, Pune, India. Electronic address: a.kunte13@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus