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Recurring spontaneous aseptic pneumoperitoneum presenting secondary to an unrelated chief complaint: A case report.

Alassaf M - Int J Surg Case Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: He also had upper and lower endoscopies in 2011, which were negative.This case revealed very different finding than anticipated.The patient presented to the emergency department with symptoms unrelated to the CT findings of free intraperitoneal gas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Gold Coast University Hospital, Department of Surgery, 1 Hospital Boulevard, Southport, QLD 4215, Australia. Electronic address: dr_3assaf@yahoo.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chest radiography July, 2011. Aseptic spontaneous pneumoperitoneum of unknown origin discovered during routine physical examination.
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fig0005: Chest radiography July, 2011. Aseptic spontaneous pneumoperitoneum of unknown origin discovered during routine physical examination.

Mentions: In July 2011, this 66-year-old male presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and distention following an outpatient chest radiograph revealing free intraperitoneal gas (Fig. 1). He complained of gradual bloating and abdominal distention. Upon examination, the patient was afebrile. His abdomen was soft and denied any pain with palpation. His white blood cell count was within normal limits at 4.7. Surgical notes indicated it as a “difficult diagnosis with a patient that presents clinically well”.


Recurring spontaneous aseptic pneumoperitoneum presenting secondary to an unrelated chief complaint: A case report.

Alassaf M - Int J Surg Case Rep (2014)

Chest radiography July, 2011. Aseptic spontaneous pneumoperitoneum of unknown origin discovered during routine physical examination.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4336396&req=5

fig0005: Chest radiography July, 2011. Aseptic spontaneous pneumoperitoneum of unknown origin discovered during routine physical examination.
Mentions: In July 2011, this 66-year-old male presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and distention following an outpatient chest radiograph revealing free intraperitoneal gas (Fig. 1). He complained of gradual bloating and abdominal distention. Upon examination, the patient was afebrile. His abdomen was soft and denied any pain with palpation. His white blood cell count was within normal limits at 4.7. Surgical notes indicated it as a “difficult diagnosis with a patient that presents clinically well”.

Bottom Line: He also had upper and lower endoscopies in 2011, which were negative.This case revealed very different finding than anticipated.The patient presented to the emergency department with symptoms unrelated to the CT findings of free intraperitoneal gas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Gold Coast University Hospital, Department of Surgery, 1 Hospital Boulevard, Southport, QLD 4215, Australia. Electronic address: dr_3assaf@yahoo.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus