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Cognitive assessment of elderly inpatients: a clinical audit.

Shermon E, Vernon LO, McGrath AJ - Dement Geriatr Cogn Dis Extra (2015)

Bottom Line: A descriptive analysis of the results was performed.However, this rate improved to 56% by discharge.Our findings support the need for increased education regarding the importance and benefits of assessment as well as how to complete and document the assessment correctly.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Birmingham, Edgbaston Campus, Birmingham, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Comprehensive geriatric assessment including cognitive assessment results in better outcomes and quality of life through facilitating access to support and further care. The National Audit of Dementia Care revealed too few patients were being assessed for cognition and therefore failing to receive adequate care.

Methods: This was a retrospective clinical audit in a district general hospital with systematic sampling of the clinical records of 50 inpatients on an elderly care ward. A descriptive analysis of the results was performed.

Results: Despite guidance that cognitive assessment should be performed on admission, this was only documented in 22% of the medical notes. However, this rate improved to 56% by discharge. The most commonly used tool was the Abbreviated Mental Test (AMT) 10. Assessment completion was independent of gender or social support, but only patients aged over 75 years were assessed. Of those, 75% had some level of cognitive impairment and 36.8% received a new or suspected diagnosis of dementia.

Discussion: Cognitive assessment rates continue to be low. Our findings support the need for increased education regarding the importance and benefits of assessment as well as how to complete and document the assessment correctly.

Conclusion: Cognitive assessment rates need to be further improved to promote better outcomes for patients with dementia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Rates of assessment by age.
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Figure 2: Rates of assessment by age.

Mentions: Assessment completion was largely independent of patient gender, with assessment being completed in 52.6% of males and 58.1% of females. There was also no trend between the patient's level of independence and whether cognitive assessment was performed, with similar frequencies amongst patients with different care needs. We assessed the level of independence in accordance to the patients' place of residence, package of care and level of family support prior to admission as indicated in their notes. Assessment was only performed in patients over the age of 75 years, with varying frequency between age subgroups. The highest rate of completion (83%) was seen in patients aged 75-79 years. In the 80-84 age group, 42.9% of the patients were assessed; this rate increased to 66.7% in those aged 85-89 years, before it again fell to 57.1% in patients aged 90 years and above (fig. 2). There is no clear explanation for this variation.


Cognitive assessment of elderly inpatients: a clinical audit.

Shermon E, Vernon LO, McGrath AJ - Dement Geriatr Cogn Dis Extra (2015)

Rates of assessment by age.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4335629&req=5

Figure 2: Rates of assessment by age.
Mentions: Assessment completion was largely independent of patient gender, with assessment being completed in 52.6% of males and 58.1% of females. There was also no trend between the patient's level of independence and whether cognitive assessment was performed, with similar frequencies amongst patients with different care needs. We assessed the level of independence in accordance to the patients' place of residence, package of care and level of family support prior to admission as indicated in their notes. Assessment was only performed in patients over the age of 75 years, with varying frequency between age subgroups. The highest rate of completion (83%) was seen in patients aged 75-79 years. In the 80-84 age group, 42.9% of the patients were assessed; this rate increased to 66.7% in those aged 85-89 years, before it again fell to 57.1% in patients aged 90 years and above (fig. 2). There is no clear explanation for this variation.

Bottom Line: A descriptive analysis of the results was performed.However, this rate improved to 56% by discharge.Our findings support the need for increased education regarding the importance and benefits of assessment as well as how to complete and document the assessment correctly.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Birmingham, Edgbaston Campus, Birmingham, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Comprehensive geriatric assessment including cognitive assessment results in better outcomes and quality of life through facilitating access to support and further care. The National Audit of Dementia Care revealed too few patients were being assessed for cognition and therefore failing to receive adequate care.

Methods: This was a retrospective clinical audit in a district general hospital with systematic sampling of the clinical records of 50 inpatients on an elderly care ward. A descriptive analysis of the results was performed.

Results: Despite guidance that cognitive assessment should be performed on admission, this was only documented in 22% of the medical notes. However, this rate improved to 56% by discharge. The most commonly used tool was the Abbreviated Mental Test (AMT) 10. Assessment completion was independent of gender or social support, but only patients aged over 75 years were assessed. Of those, 75% had some level of cognitive impairment and 36.8% received a new or suspected diagnosis of dementia.

Discussion: Cognitive assessment rates continue to be low. Our findings support the need for increased education regarding the importance and benefits of assessment as well as how to complete and document the assessment correctly.

Conclusion: Cognitive assessment rates need to be further improved to promote better outcomes for patients with dementia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus