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Neck circumference, along with other anthropometric indices, has an independent and additional contribution in predicting fatty liver disease.

Huang BX, Zhu MF, Wu T, Zhou JY, Liu Y, Chen XL, Zhou RF, Wang LJ, Chen YM, Zhu HL - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: After further adjusting for other anthropometric indices, both individually and combined, the corresponding ORs remained significant (all P-trends<0.05) but were attenuated to 1.94-2.53 for women and 1.45-2.08 for men.An additive interaction existed between neck circumference and the other anthropometric measures (all P<0.05).A high neck circumference value was associated with a much greater prevalence of fatty liver disease in participants with both high and normal BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio values.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, The People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

Background and aim: Previous studies have indicated that neck circumference is a valuable predictor for obesity and metabolic syndrome, but little evidence is available for fatty liver disease. We examined the association of neck circumference with fatty liver disease and evaluated its predictive value in Chinese adults.

Methods: This cross-sectional study comprised 4053 participants (1617 women and 2436 men, aged 20-88) recruited from the Health Examination Center in Guangzhou, China between May 2009 and April 2010. Anthropometric measurements were taken, abdominal ultrasonography was conducted and blood biochemical parameters were measured. Covariance, logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were employed.

Results: The mean neck circumference was greater in subjects with fatty liver disease than those without the disease in both women and men after adjusting for age (P<0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that the age-adjusted ORs (95% CI) of fatty liver disease for quartile 4 (vs. quartile 1) of neck circumference were 7.70 (4.95-11.99) for women and 12.42 (9.22-16.74) for men. After further adjusting for other anthropometric indices, both individually and combined, the corresponding ORs remained significant (all P-trends<0.05) but were attenuated to 1.94-2.53 for women and 1.45-2.08 for men. An additive interaction existed between neck circumference and the other anthropometric measures (all P<0.05). A high neck circumference value was associated with a much greater prevalence of fatty liver disease in participants with both high and normal BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio values.

Conclusions: Neck circumference was an independent predictor for fatty liver disease and provided an additional contribution when applied with other anthropometric measures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mechanisms linking a hypertrophic neck with the development of fatty liver disease.
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pone.0118071.g002: Mechanisms linking a hypertrophic neck with the development of fatty liver disease.

Mentions: NC was independently correlated with FLD in this study and with cardiometabolic risk factors beyond other adiposity measures in previous reports [20,37]. The potential mechanism might be related to upper-body fat [39,40], which could be estimated by the NC [34,37]. Upper-body obesity causes metabolic abnormalities, including increased circulating free fatty acids (FFAs) [41]. The excess FFAs may contribute to the development of FLD by (1) contributing to triglyceride formation and storage in the liver, as Donnelly et al. [42] reported that 59% of hepatic fat is derived from circulating FFAs, with lesser contributions from de novo lipogenesis (26%) and diet (15%), (2) inducing insulin resistance, which is thought to be related to the first “hit” in the multistep pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, or (3) increasing oxidative stress, thereby triggering the inflammatory response and progressive liver damage. Stojiljkovic et al. [43] reported that an acute increase in plasma lipids increased the concentration of the oxidative stress biomarker F2-isoprostanes and raised the possibility of the cardiovascular risk factor cluster. These observations might explain the mechanism by which an increased neck circumference independently increases the risk of developing fatty liver disease. (Fig. 2)


Neck circumference, along with other anthropometric indices, has an independent and additional contribution in predicting fatty liver disease.

Huang BX, Zhu MF, Wu T, Zhou JY, Liu Y, Chen XL, Zhou RF, Wang LJ, Chen YM, Zhu HL - PLoS ONE (2015)

Mechanisms linking a hypertrophic neck with the development of fatty liver disease.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4334519&req=5

pone.0118071.g002: Mechanisms linking a hypertrophic neck with the development of fatty liver disease.
Mentions: NC was independently correlated with FLD in this study and with cardiometabolic risk factors beyond other adiposity measures in previous reports [20,37]. The potential mechanism might be related to upper-body fat [39,40], which could be estimated by the NC [34,37]. Upper-body obesity causes metabolic abnormalities, including increased circulating free fatty acids (FFAs) [41]. The excess FFAs may contribute to the development of FLD by (1) contributing to triglyceride formation and storage in the liver, as Donnelly et al. [42] reported that 59% of hepatic fat is derived from circulating FFAs, with lesser contributions from de novo lipogenesis (26%) and diet (15%), (2) inducing insulin resistance, which is thought to be related to the first “hit” in the multistep pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, or (3) increasing oxidative stress, thereby triggering the inflammatory response and progressive liver damage. Stojiljkovic et al. [43] reported that an acute increase in plasma lipids increased the concentration of the oxidative stress biomarker F2-isoprostanes and raised the possibility of the cardiovascular risk factor cluster. These observations might explain the mechanism by which an increased neck circumference independently increases the risk of developing fatty liver disease. (Fig. 2)

Bottom Line: After further adjusting for other anthropometric indices, both individually and combined, the corresponding ORs remained significant (all P-trends<0.05) but were attenuated to 1.94-2.53 for women and 1.45-2.08 for men.An additive interaction existed between neck circumference and the other anthropometric measures (all P<0.05).A high neck circumference value was associated with a much greater prevalence of fatty liver disease in participants with both high and normal BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio values.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, The People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

Background and aim: Previous studies have indicated that neck circumference is a valuable predictor for obesity and metabolic syndrome, but little evidence is available for fatty liver disease. We examined the association of neck circumference with fatty liver disease and evaluated its predictive value in Chinese adults.

Methods: This cross-sectional study comprised 4053 participants (1617 women and 2436 men, aged 20-88) recruited from the Health Examination Center in Guangzhou, China between May 2009 and April 2010. Anthropometric measurements were taken, abdominal ultrasonography was conducted and blood biochemical parameters were measured. Covariance, logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were employed.

Results: The mean neck circumference was greater in subjects with fatty liver disease than those without the disease in both women and men after adjusting for age (P<0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that the age-adjusted ORs (95% CI) of fatty liver disease for quartile 4 (vs. quartile 1) of neck circumference were 7.70 (4.95-11.99) for women and 12.42 (9.22-16.74) for men. After further adjusting for other anthropometric indices, both individually and combined, the corresponding ORs remained significant (all P-trends<0.05) but were attenuated to 1.94-2.53 for women and 1.45-2.08 for men. An additive interaction existed between neck circumference and the other anthropometric measures (all P<0.05). A high neck circumference value was associated with a much greater prevalence of fatty liver disease in participants with both high and normal BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio values.

Conclusions: Neck circumference was an independent predictor for fatty liver disease and provided an additional contribution when applied with other anthropometric measures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus