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Diagnosis and treatment of a lateral meniscal cyst with musculoskeletal ultrasound.

Chen H - Case Rep Orthop (2015)

Bottom Line: Meniscal cysts are a relatively uncommon occurrence that may result in pain and disability in the knee.It is widely believed that meniscal cysts are secondary to fluid extrusion from a meniscus tear.We present a patient with a contraindication to MRI who was diagnosed with a lateral meniscal cyst by musculoskeletal ultrasound and treated with an ultrasound-guided lateral meniscal cyst aspiration and injection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521, USA.

ABSTRACT
Meniscal cysts are a relatively uncommon occurrence that may result in pain and disability in the knee. It is widely believed that meniscal cysts are secondary to fluid extrusion from a meniscus tear. Typically, diagnosis of a meniscal cyst typically requires magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to delineate the cyst and any associated injuries. With improvements in sonographic technology, ultrasound has emerged as a sensitive modality for detection of meniscal cysts. We present a patient with a contraindication to MRI who was diagnosed with a lateral meniscal cyst by musculoskeletal ultrasound and treated with an ultrasound-guided lateral meniscal cyst aspiration and injection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Visible mass on lateral joint line on the knee.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Visible mass on lateral joint line on the knee.

Mentions: A 26-year-old male with no significant past medical history presented to our clinic with a chief complaint of left lateral knee pain. On examination, the patient had a visible 2 × 2 cm mass on the knee at the lateral joint line (Figure 1). The mass was tender to palpation. Mcmurray, Ober, Lachman's, and anterior/posterior drawer tests were negative. A diagnostic ultrasound was performed in clinic, which revealed an anechoic cyst extending from the lateral meniscus (Figure 2). The patient was provided with education regarding both conservative and surgical treatment options. The patient opted for nonoperative management of the meniscal cyst and proceeded with aspiration and injection of the cyst under ultrasound guidance.


Diagnosis and treatment of a lateral meniscal cyst with musculoskeletal ultrasound.

Chen H - Case Rep Orthop (2015)

Visible mass on lateral joint line on the knee.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4334430&req=5

fig1: Visible mass on lateral joint line on the knee.
Mentions: A 26-year-old male with no significant past medical history presented to our clinic with a chief complaint of left lateral knee pain. On examination, the patient had a visible 2 × 2 cm mass on the knee at the lateral joint line (Figure 1). The mass was tender to palpation. Mcmurray, Ober, Lachman's, and anterior/posterior drawer tests were negative. A diagnostic ultrasound was performed in clinic, which revealed an anechoic cyst extending from the lateral meniscus (Figure 2). The patient was provided with education regarding both conservative and surgical treatment options. The patient opted for nonoperative management of the meniscal cyst and proceeded with aspiration and injection of the cyst under ultrasound guidance.

Bottom Line: Meniscal cysts are a relatively uncommon occurrence that may result in pain and disability in the knee.It is widely believed that meniscal cysts are secondary to fluid extrusion from a meniscus tear.We present a patient with a contraindication to MRI who was diagnosed with a lateral meniscal cyst by musculoskeletal ultrasound and treated with an ultrasound-guided lateral meniscal cyst aspiration and injection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521, USA.

ABSTRACT
Meniscal cysts are a relatively uncommon occurrence that may result in pain and disability in the knee. It is widely believed that meniscal cysts are secondary to fluid extrusion from a meniscus tear. Typically, diagnosis of a meniscal cyst typically requires magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to delineate the cyst and any associated injuries. With improvements in sonographic technology, ultrasound has emerged as a sensitive modality for detection of meniscal cysts. We present a patient with a contraindication to MRI who was diagnosed with a lateral meniscal cyst by musculoskeletal ultrasound and treated with an ultrasound-guided lateral meniscal cyst aspiration and injection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus