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A case of calcified metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma mimicking a benign lesion: pitfalls in diagnosis.

Michail P, Amith I, George S, George MK - Case Rep Oncol Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Brain metastases originating from colorectal cancers are rare, occurring in approximately 2-3% of patients.Therefore the presence of a calcified brain lesion in a patient with a positive oncological history requires a high index of suspicion for brain metastases.Subsequent imaging following a neurological episode revealed a significant increase in size of the lesion with surrounding tissue oedema, prompting further investigation for suspicion of a calcified metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia.

ABSTRACT
The radiological finding of a calcified intracranial lesion commonly represents a slow growing benign mass. Brain metastases originating from colorectal cancers are rare, occurring in approximately 2-3% of patients. Therefore the presence of a calcified brain lesion in a patient with a positive oncological history requires a high index of suspicion for brain metastases. Presented herein is a case of a frontoparietal calcified lesion initially overlooked as a benign tumour. Subsequent imaging following a neurological episode revealed a significant increase in size of the lesion with surrounding tissue oedema, prompting further investigation for suspicion of a calcified metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) 2013 precontrast CT coronal view. (b) 2013 postcontrast CT coronal view.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: (a) 2013 precontrast CT coronal view. (b) 2013 postcontrast CT coronal view.

Mentions: Two years after diagnosis (04/2013) a CT brain with contrast was performed revealing an incidental finding of a calcified lesion (Figure 1). The calcified focus was 6 × 10 mm located superficially in the high right frontoparietal region with no obvious enhancement of soft tissue density. It was reported as a diagnosis of either an old meningioma or granuloma. Based on the small size, location, calcification, and uniform enhancement after contrast administration, with no oedema or tissue enhancement, the decision was made not to investigate further and treat conservatively.


A case of calcified metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma mimicking a benign lesion: pitfalls in diagnosis.

Michail P, Amith I, George S, George MK - Case Rep Oncol Med (2015)

(a) 2013 precontrast CT coronal view. (b) 2013 postcontrast CT coronal view.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4334428&req=5

fig1: (a) 2013 precontrast CT coronal view. (b) 2013 postcontrast CT coronal view.
Mentions: Two years after diagnosis (04/2013) a CT brain with contrast was performed revealing an incidental finding of a calcified lesion (Figure 1). The calcified focus was 6 × 10 mm located superficially in the high right frontoparietal region with no obvious enhancement of soft tissue density. It was reported as a diagnosis of either an old meningioma or granuloma. Based on the small size, location, calcification, and uniform enhancement after contrast administration, with no oedema or tissue enhancement, the decision was made not to investigate further and treat conservatively.

Bottom Line: Brain metastases originating from colorectal cancers are rare, occurring in approximately 2-3% of patients.Therefore the presence of a calcified brain lesion in a patient with a positive oncological history requires a high index of suspicion for brain metastases.Subsequent imaging following a neurological episode revealed a significant increase in size of the lesion with surrounding tissue oedema, prompting further investigation for suspicion of a calcified metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia.

ABSTRACT
The radiological finding of a calcified intracranial lesion commonly represents a slow growing benign mass. Brain metastases originating from colorectal cancers are rare, occurring in approximately 2-3% of patients. Therefore the presence of a calcified brain lesion in a patient with a positive oncological history requires a high index of suspicion for brain metastases. Presented herein is a case of a frontoparietal calcified lesion initially overlooked as a benign tumour. Subsequent imaging following a neurological episode revealed a significant increase in size of the lesion with surrounding tissue oedema, prompting further investigation for suspicion of a calcified metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus