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Gastroenteritis attributable to rotavirus in hospitalized Saudi Arabian children in the period 2007-2008.

Khalil M, Azhar E, Kao M, Al-Kaiedi N, Alhani H, Al Olayan I, Pawinski R, Gopala K, Kandeil W, Anis S, Van Doorn LJ, DeAntonio R - Clin Epidemiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Two children (one RV positive and one RV negative) died due to GE complications.RVGE is responsible for a high proportion of hospitalizations in Saudi children younger than 5 years of age.Routine RV vaccination has therefore been introduced into the national immunization program and may help reduce the morbidity, mortality, and disease burden associated with RVGE in Saudi Arabia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Public Health and Research Development, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Rotavirus (RV) is a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis (GE) in children across the world. As there is a lack of epidemiological data for RV gastroenteritis (RVGE) in Saudi Arabia, this hospital-based study was designed to estimate the disease burden of RVGE and assess the prevalent RV types in Saudi children younger than 5 years of age.

Patients and methods: Children hospitalized for acute GE were enrolled at four pediatric referral hospitals in Saudi Arabia. The study was conducted from February 2007 to March 2008 and used the World Health Organization's generic protocol for RVGE surveillance. The Vesikari severity scale was used to assess the severity of RVGE. Stool samples were tested for RV using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Samples were further typed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and hybridization assay for determining the G and P types.

Results: A total of 1,007 children were enrolled; the final analysis included 970 children, of whom 395 were RV positive, 568 were RV negative, and seven had unknown RV status. The proportion of RVGE among GE hospitalizations was 40.7% (95% confidence interval: 37.6-43.9). The highest percentage of RVGE hospitalizations (83.1%) was seen in children younger than 2 years of age. The highest proportion of RV among GE hospitalizations was in June 2007 with 57.1%. The most common RV types detected were G1P[8] (49.3%), G1G9P[8] (13.2%), and G9P[8] (9.6%). Before hospitalization, severe GE episodes occurred in 88.1% RV-positive and 79.6% RV-negative children. Overall, 94% children had recovered by the time they were discharged. Two children (one RV positive and one RV negative) died due to GE complications.

Conclusion: RVGE is responsible for a high proportion of hospitalizations in Saudi children younger than 5 years of age. Routine RV vaccination has therefore been introduced into the national immunization program and may help reduce the morbidity, mortality, and disease burden associated with RVGE in Saudi Arabia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Seasonal distribution of RVGE and GE hospitalizations (N=970).Note: The X-axis represents the months February 2007 through February 2008.Abbreviations: GE, gastroenteritis; RV, rotavirus; RVGE, RV gastroenteritis.
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f2-clep-7-129: Seasonal distribution of RVGE and GE hospitalizations (N=970).Note: The X-axis represents the months February 2007 through February 2008.Abbreviations: GE, gastroenteritis; RV, rotavirus; RVGE, RV gastroenteritis.

Mentions: The highest number of acute GE hospitalizations (127 cases) was reported in July 2007. Although RVGE occurred throughout the year, the highest proportion of RV among GE patients occurred in June 2007 (57.14%, 44/77), followed by August 2007 (52.0%, 52/100), and February 2008 (51.5%, 38/68) (Figure 2). August 2007, July 2007, and June 2007 had the largest number of RVGE cases with 54, 52, and 44 cases, respectively.


Gastroenteritis attributable to rotavirus in hospitalized Saudi Arabian children in the period 2007-2008.

Khalil M, Azhar E, Kao M, Al-Kaiedi N, Alhani H, Al Olayan I, Pawinski R, Gopala K, Kandeil W, Anis S, Van Doorn LJ, DeAntonio R - Clin Epidemiol (2015)

Seasonal distribution of RVGE and GE hospitalizations (N=970).Note: The X-axis represents the months February 2007 through February 2008.Abbreviations: GE, gastroenteritis; RV, rotavirus; RVGE, RV gastroenteritis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4334312&req=5

f2-clep-7-129: Seasonal distribution of RVGE and GE hospitalizations (N=970).Note: The X-axis represents the months February 2007 through February 2008.Abbreviations: GE, gastroenteritis; RV, rotavirus; RVGE, RV gastroenteritis.
Mentions: The highest number of acute GE hospitalizations (127 cases) was reported in July 2007. Although RVGE occurred throughout the year, the highest proportion of RV among GE patients occurred in June 2007 (57.14%, 44/77), followed by August 2007 (52.0%, 52/100), and February 2008 (51.5%, 38/68) (Figure 2). August 2007, July 2007, and June 2007 had the largest number of RVGE cases with 54, 52, and 44 cases, respectively.

Bottom Line: Two children (one RV positive and one RV negative) died due to GE complications.RVGE is responsible for a high proportion of hospitalizations in Saudi children younger than 5 years of age.Routine RV vaccination has therefore been introduced into the national immunization program and may help reduce the morbidity, mortality, and disease burden associated with RVGE in Saudi Arabia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Public Health and Research Development, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Rotavirus (RV) is a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis (GE) in children across the world. As there is a lack of epidemiological data for RV gastroenteritis (RVGE) in Saudi Arabia, this hospital-based study was designed to estimate the disease burden of RVGE and assess the prevalent RV types in Saudi children younger than 5 years of age.

Patients and methods: Children hospitalized for acute GE were enrolled at four pediatric referral hospitals in Saudi Arabia. The study was conducted from February 2007 to March 2008 and used the World Health Organization's generic protocol for RVGE surveillance. The Vesikari severity scale was used to assess the severity of RVGE. Stool samples were tested for RV using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Samples were further typed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and hybridization assay for determining the G and P types.

Results: A total of 1,007 children were enrolled; the final analysis included 970 children, of whom 395 were RV positive, 568 were RV negative, and seven had unknown RV status. The proportion of RVGE among GE hospitalizations was 40.7% (95% confidence interval: 37.6-43.9). The highest percentage of RVGE hospitalizations (83.1%) was seen in children younger than 2 years of age. The highest proportion of RV among GE hospitalizations was in June 2007 with 57.1%. The most common RV types detected were G1P[8] (49.3%), G1G9P[8] (13.2%), and G9P[8] (9.6%). Before hospitalization, severe GE episodes occurred in 88.1% RV-positive and 79.6% RV-negative children. Overall, 94% children had recovered by the time they were discharged. Two children (one RV positive and one RV negative) died due to GE complications.

Conclusion: RVGE is responsible for a high proportion of hospitalizations in Saudi children younger than 5 years of age. Routine RV vaccination has therefore been introduced into the national immunization program and may help reduce the morbidity, mortality, and disease burden associated with RVGE in Saudi Arabia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus