Limits...
Test, learn, adapt.

Teoh PJ, Camm CF - Ann Med Surg (Lond) (2012)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Southampton Medical School.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

A recent paper has highlighted the use of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) as a basis for creating and implementing policies by the United Kingdom government... Therefore, this paper explores what public policy-makers can learn from medicine's extensive experience with RCTs so that public policy may be both cost-effective and efficacious... RCTs provide a high level of evidence in evidence-based medicine; doctors can deliver one of their most valuable tools to policy-makers... RCTs also demonstrate the effects of no intervention at all... Current practice to determine cost-effectiveness of a policy in the public sector, involves the piloting of an intervention in one geographical location... This has clear drawbacks compared to an RCT... Although RCTs are used extensively in the health sector, some argue that within economics other trial designs can give equivalent evidence... The recent white paper released by the cabinet describes how, ‘transparency is at the heart of [their] agenda for government’ in order to ‘reform public services’... Policy-makers can also learn from medical sciences that an RCT demonstrating that an intervention is not effective is just as successful as the converse... Both types of result can benefit policies... Just as those in the health sector require help from academics, statisticians and other professionals, policy-makers will also... In the vast majority of situations it may be logistically impossible or unnecessary to seek consent... RCTs can provide clear benefits to policy-makers in their decision-making... Policy-makers may look to the experience of those in the health sector for past mistakes to learn from, and for useful tools to adopt.

No MeSH data available.


A stepped wedge trial design, adapted from Brown et al.14
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4326125&req=5

fig0005: A stepped wedge trial design, adapted from Brown et al.14

Mentions: The impact of such a trial could have been mitigated by a ‘stepped wedge’ approach, often necessitated due to logistical or financial constraints.14 In medicine, ‘stepped wedge’ trials are also performed, for example in quality improvement exercises.15 It is necessary to point out that the ethical issue does not exist if there is true equipoise between the two positions. Figure 1 demonstrates this process of policies being sequentially implemented to clusters or individuals over time, in a random order until all groups are allocated the intervention.


Test, learn, adapt.

Teoh PJ, Camm CF - Ann Med Surg (Lond) (2012)

A stepped wedge trial design, adapted from Brown et al.14
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4326125&req=5

fig0005: A stepped wedge trial design, adapted from Brown et al.14
Mentions: The impact of such a trial could have been mitigated by a ‘stepped wedge’ approach, often necessitated due to logistical or financial constraints.14 In medicine, ‘stepped wedge’ trials are also performed, for example in quality improvement exercises.15 It is necessary to point out that the ethical issue does not exist if there is true equipoise between the two positions. Figure 1 demonstrates this process of policies being sequentially implemented to clusters or individuals over time, in a random order until all groups are allocated the intervention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Southampton Medical School.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

A recent paper has highlighted the use of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) as a basis for creating and implementing policies by the United Kingdom government... Therefore, this paper explores what public policy-makers can learn from medicine's extensive experience with RCTs so that public policy may be both cost-effective and efficacious... RCTs provide a high level of evidence in evidence-based medicine; doctors can deliver one of their most valuable tools to policy-makers... RCTs also demonstrate the effects of no intervention at all... Current practice to determine cost-effectiveness of a policy in the public sector, involves the piloting of an intervention in one geographical location... This has clear drawbacks compared to an RCT... Although RCTs are used extensively in the health sector, some argue that within economics other trial designs can give equivalent evidence... The recent white paper released by the cabinet describes how, ‘transparency is at the heart of [their] agenda for government’ in order to ‘reform public services’... Policy-makers can also learn from medical sciences that an RCT demonstrating that an intervention is not effective is just as successful as the converse... Both types of result can benefit policies... Just as those in the health sector require help from academics, statisticians and other professionals, policy-makers will also... In the vast majority of situations it may be logistically impossible or unnecessary to seek consent... RCTs can provide clear benefits to policy-makers in their decision-making... Policy-makers may look to the experience of those in the health sector for past mistakes to learn from, and for useful tools to adopt.

No MeSH data available.