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Development of noncytotoxic chitosan-gold nanocomposites as efficient antibacterial materials.

Regiel-Futyra A, Kus-Liśkiewicz M, Sebastian V, Irusta S, Arruebo M, Stochel G, Kyzioł A - ACS Appl Mater Interfaces (2015)

Bottom Line: The resulting nanocomposites did not show any cytotoxicity against mammalian somatic and tumoral cells.They produced a disruptive effect on the bacteria wall while their internalization was hindered on the eukaryotic cells.This selectivity and safety make them potentially applicable as antimicrobial coatings in the biomedical field.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University , Ingardena 3, 30-060 Kraków, Poland.

ABSTRACT
This work describes the synthesis and characterization of noncytotoxic nanocomposites either colloidal or as films exhibiting high antibacterial activity. The biocompatible and biodegradable polymer chitosan was used as reducing and stabilizing agent for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles embedded in it. Herein, for the first time, three different chitosan grades varying in the average molecular weight and deacetylation degree (DD) were used with an optimized gold precursor concentration. Several factors were analyzed in order to obtain antimicrobial but not cytotoxic nanocomposite materials. Films based on chitosan with medium molecular weight and the highest DD exhibited the highest antibacterial activity against biofilm forming strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The resulting nanocomposites did not show any cytotoxicity against mammalian somatic and tumoral cells. They produced a disruptive effect on the bacteria wall while their internalization was hindered on the eukaryotic cells. This selectivity and safety make them potentially applicable as antimicrobial coatings in the biomedical field.

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Cellular viability after 24 h incubation with CS L/M/Hbased nanocompositeswith different content of gold nanoparticles A549 (A) MTT assay andHaCaT (B) MTT and (C) LDH assay. Data are expressed as the mean ±standard error (n = 9).
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fig10: Cellular viability after 24 h incubation with CS L/M/Hbased nanocompositeswith different content of gold nanoparticles A549 (A) MTT assay andHaCaT (B) MTT and (C) LDH assay. Data are expressed as the mean ±standard error (n = 9).

Mentions: In the next step, A549 and HaCaT cells were incubated with chitosan–goldnanocomposites after 24 h. Again, the cytotoxicity was quantifiedby the MTT and LDH assays (Figure 10). Concentrationof AuNPs and chitosan molecular weight clearly influence the toxiceffect for both cell lines. According to the MTT results, CS_L basedfilms at each AuNPs concentration level exhibited the highest reductionrate (∼20%) for both cell lines. However, A549 cells appearedto be more sensitive to the nanocomposite presence and the M10 sampleinduced almost 40% viability reduction (Figure 10A). Still, CS_M samples with lower gold content were the least toxic.Importantly, HaCaT cells turned out to be more tolerant to CS-AuNPscontact (Figure 10B,C). No cell viability reductionwas noted even for the M10 composite. Additionally, LDH test was performedfor HaCaT cells and confirms no significant cytotoxicity on the testedmaterials.


Development of noncytotoxic chitosan-gold nanocomposites as efficient antibacterial materials.

Regiel-Futyra A, Kus-Liśkiewicz M, Sebastian V, Irusta S, Arruebo M, Stochel G, Kyzioł A - ACS Appl Mater Interfaces (2015)

Cellular viability after 24 h incubation with CS L/M/Hbased nanocompositeswith different content of gold nanoparticles A549 (A) MTT assay andHaCaT (B) MTT and (C) LDH assay. Data are expressed as the mean ±standard error (n = 9).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4326049&req=5

fig10: Cellular viability after 24 h incubation with CS L/M/Hbased nanocompositeswith different content of gold nanoparticles A549 (A) MTT assay andHaCaT (B) MTT and (C) LDH assay. Data are expressed as the mean ±standard error (n = 9).
Mentions: In the next step, A549 and HaCaT cells were incubated with chitosan–goldnanocomposites after 24 h. Again, the cytotoxicity was quantifiedby the MTT and LDH assays (Figure 10). Concentrationof AuNPs and chitosan molecular weight clearly influence the toxiceffect for both cell lines. According to the MTT results, CS_L basedfilms at each AuNPs concentration level exhibited the highest reductionrate (∼20%) for both cell lines. However, A549 cells appearedto be more sensitive to the nanocomposite presence and the M10 sampleinduced almost 40% viability reduction (Figure 10A). Still, CS_M samples with lower gold content were the least toxic.Importantly, HaCaT cells turned out to be more tolerant to CS-AuNPscontact (Figure 10B,C). No cell viability reductionwas noted even for the M10 composite. Additionally, LDH test was performedfor HaCaT cells and confirms no significant cytotoxicity on the testedmaterials.

Bottom Line: The resulting nanocomposites did not show any cytotoxicity against mammalian somatic and tumoral cells.They produced a disruptive effect on the bacteria wall while their internalization was hindered on the eukaryotic cells.This selectivity and safety make them potentially applicable as antimicrobial coatings in the biomedical field.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University , Ingardena 3, 30-060 Kraków, Poland.

ABSTRACT
This work describes the synthesis and characterization of noncytotoxic nanocomposites either colloidal or as films exhibiting high antibacterial activity. The biocompatible and biodegradable polymer chitosan was used as reducing and stabilizing agent for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles embedded in it. Herein, for the first time, three different chitosan grades varying in the average molecular weight and deacetylation degree (DD) were used with an optimized gold precursor concentration. Several factors were analyzed in order to obtain antimicrobial but not cytotoxic nanocomposite materials. Films based on chitosan with medium molecular weight and the highest DD exhibited the highest antibacterial activity against biofilm forming strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The resulting nanocomposites did not show any cytotoxicity against mammalian somatic and tumoral cells. They produced a disruptive effect on the bacteria wall while their internalization was hindered on the eukaryotic cells. This selectivity and safety make them potentially applicable as antimicrobial coatings in the biomedical field.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus