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Characterizing the assessment and management of vitamin d levels in patients with osteoporosis in clinical practice: a chart review initiative.

Adachi JD, Brown JP, Ioannidis G - J Osteoporos (2015)

Bottom Line: Physicians also evaluated patients' current regimens and detailed proposed changes, if applicable.Nearly 85% of patients were prescribed calcium and vitamin D supplements.Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels were available for 73% of patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Charlton Medical Centre, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, 25 Charlton Avenue E., Suite 501, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 1Y2.

ABSTRACT
Though vitamin D is important for bone health, little is known about the monitoring and management of vitamin D levels in patients with osteoporosis in clinical practice-a deficit this chart review initiative aimed to remedy. A total of 52 physicians completed profiles for 983 patients being treated for osteoporosis between November 2008 and April 2009. Information collected included demographics; fracture risk factors; availability and level of serum vitamin D measurements; and information on osteoporosis medications and calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Physicians also evaluated patients' current regimens and detailed proposed changes, if applicable. Nearly 85% of patients were prescribed calcium and vitamin D supplements. Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels were available for 73% of patients. Of these patients, approximately 50% had levels less than 80 nmol/L, which contrasts with the 37% thought to have "unsatisfactory" vitamin D levels based on physician perceptions. Physicians felt 26% of patients would benefit from additional vitamin D supplementation. However, no changes to the osteoporosis regimen were suggested for 48% of patients perceived to have "unsatisfactory" vitamin D levels. The results underscore the importance of considering vitamin D status when looking to optimize bone health.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Physician evaluation of osteoporosis regimens. *Based on answers to the question, “Is this patient's BMD satisfactory (i.e., has there been no significant decrease in any measurement between the most recent and previous scans)?” (BMD = bone mineral density). **Based on answers to the question, “Are this patient's serum vitamin D levels adequate?” †Based on answers to the question, “If you answered ‘No' to one of the above questions, does this patient require any changes to their medication?”
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig4: Physician evaluation of osteoporosis regimens. *Based on answers to the question, “Is this patient's BMD satisfactory (i.e., has there been no significant decrease in any measurement between the most recent and previous scans)?” (BMD = bone mineral density). **Based on answers to the question, “Are this patient's serum vitamin D levels adequate?” †Based on answers to the question, “If you answered ‘No' to one of the above questions, does this patient require any changes to their medication?”

Mentions: Participating physicians evaluated the osteoporosis treatment regimens for 769 patients, 37% (n/N = 287/769) of whom were considered to have “unsatisfactory” change in BMD and 37% (n/N = 286/769) of whom were considered to have “unsatisfactory” vitamin D levels (see Figure 4). Just over half (n/N = 162/287) of patients considered to have “unsatisfactory” changes in BMD were also considered to have “unsatisfactory” vitamin D levels, as compared to 25% (n/N = 124/482) of those with “satisfactory” changes in BMD. As shown in Table 2, multivariable GEE analysis suggests that serum 25(OH)D level and body mass index were the only factors significantly associated with physicians' perceptions of whether vitamin D levels were satisfactory.


Characterizing the assessment and management of vitamin d levels in patients with osteoporosis in clinical practice: a chart review initiative.

Adachi JD, Brown JP, Ioannidis G - J Osteoporos (2015)

Physician evaluation of osteoporosis regimens. *Based on answers to the question, “Is this patient's BMD satisfactory (i.e., has there been no significant decrease in any measurement between the most recent and previous scans)?” (BMD = bone mineral density). **Based on answers to the question, “Are this patient's serum vitamin D levels adequate?” †Based on answers to the question, “If you answered ‘No' to one of the above questions, does this patient require any changes to their medication?”
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325965&req=5

fig4: Physician evaluation of osteoporosis regimens. *Based on answers to the question, “Is this patient's BMD satisfactory (i.e., has there been no significant decrease in any measurement between the most recent and previous scans)?” (BMD = bone mineral density). **Based on answers to the question, “Are this patient's serum vitamin D levels adequate?” †Based on answers to the question, “If you answered ‘No' to one of the above questions, does this patient require any changes to their medication?”
Mentions: Participating physicians evaluated the osteoporosis treatment regimens for 769 patients, 37% (n/N = 287/769) of whom were considered to have “unsatisfactory” change in BMD and 37% (n/N = 286/769) of whom were considered to have “unsatisfactory” vitamin D levels (see Figure 4). Just over half (n/N = 162/287) of patients considered to have “unsatisfactory” changes in BMD were also considered to have “unsatisfactory” vitamin D levels, as compared to 25% (n/N = 124/482) of those with “satisfactory” changes in BMD. As shown in Table 2, multivariable GEE analysis suggests that serum 25(OH)D level and body mass index were the only factors significantly associated with physicians' perceptions of whether vitamin D levels were satisfactory.

Bottom Line: Physicians also evaluated patients' current regimens and detailed proposed changes, if applicable.Nearly 85% of patients were prescribed calcium and vitamin D supplements.Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels were available for 73% of patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Charlton Medical Centre, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, 25 Charlton Avenue E., Suite 501, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 1Y2.

ABSTRACT
Though vitamin D is important for bone health, little is known about the monitoring and management of vitamin D levels in patients with osteoporosis in clinical practice-a deficit this chart review initiative aimed to remedy. A total of 52 physicians completed profiles for 983 patients being treated for osteoporosis between November 2008 and April 2009. Information collected included demographics; fracture risk factors; availability and level of serum vitamin D measurements; and information on osteoporosis medications and calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Physicians also evaluated patients' current regimens and detailed proposed changes, if applicable. Nearly 85% of patients were prescribed calcium and vitamin D supplements. Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels were available for 73% of patients. Of these patients, approximately 50% had levels less than 80 nmol/L, which contrasts with the 37% thought to have "unsatisfactory" vitamin D levels based on physician perceptions. Physicians felt 26% of patients would benefit from additional vitamin D supplementation. However, no changes to the osteoporosis regimen were suggested for 48% of patients perceived to have "unsatisfactory" vitamin D levels. The results underscore the importance of considering vitamin D status when looking to optimize bone health.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus