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Association of dual-task walking performance and leg muscle quality in healthy children.

Beurskens R, Muehlbauer T, Granacher U - BMC Pediatr (2015)

Bottom Line: Findings show that both, boys and girls, significantly decrease their gait velocity (f = 0.73), stride length (f = 0.62) and cadence (f = 0.68) and increase the variability thereof (f = 0.20-0.63) during DT compared to ST.We were able to show a potential link between leg muscular capacities and DT walking performance in children.We interpret these findings as evidence that higher leg muscle mass in children may mitigate the impact of a cognitive interference task on DT walking performance by inducing enhanced gait stability.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health and Sports Sciences, Division of Training and Movement Sciences, Research Focus Cognition Sciences, University of Potsdam, Am Neuen Palais 10, Bldg. 12, D-14469, Potsdam, Germany. rbeurskens@posteo.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous literature mainly introduced cognitive functions to explain performance decrements in dual-task walking, i.e., changes in dual-task locomotion are attributed to limited cognitive information processing capacities. In this study, we enlarge existing literature and investigate whether leg muscular capacity plays an additional role in children's dual-task walking performance.

Methods: To this end, we had prepubescent children (mean age: 8.7 ± 0.5 years, age range: 7-9 years) walk in single task (ST) and while concurrently conducting an arithmetic subtraction task (DT). Additionally, leg lean tissue mass was assessed.

Results: Findings show that both, boys and girls, significantly decrease their gait velocity (f = 0.73), stride length (f = 0.62) and cadence (f = 0.68) and increase the variability thereof (f = 0.20-0.63) during DT compared to ST. Furthermore, stepwise regressions indicate that leg lean tissue mass is closely associated with step time and the variability thereof during DT (R(2) = 0.44, p = 0.009). These associations between gait measures and leg lean tissue mass could not be observed for ST (R(2) = 0.17, p = 0.19).

Conclusion: We were able to show a potential link between leg muscular capacities and DT walking performance in children. We interpret these findings as evidence that higher leg muscle mass in children may mitigate the impact of a cognitive interference task on DT walking performance by inducing enhanced gait stability.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlations of subject’s leg lean tissue mass with stride time (A) and CV of stride time (B). Regression analysis yielded significant associations between stride time, the CV thereof, and subject’s LTM-LE (R2 = 0.44; p = 0.009) during dual-task walking.
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Fig3: Correlations of subject’s leg lean tissue mass with stride time (A) and CV of stride time (B). Regression analysis yielded significant associations between stride time, the CV thereof, and subject’s LTM-LE (R2 = 0.44; p = 0.009) during dual-task walking.

Mentions: Pearson’s correlation analyses with Bonferroni-corrected p-values of LTM-LE and measures of gait indicated non-significant, small sized correlations, irrespective of the measure considered. Furthermore, LTM-LE was not significantly correlated with age (r = 0.37; p = 0.1). Of note, we observed an unequivocal tendency indicating that participants with less LTM-LE walked slower (r = 0.41; p = 0.42) and took shorter steps (r = −0.43; p = 0.35) with larger variability of gait velocity (r = −0.38; p = 0.54), and stride time (r = −0.56; p = 0.07) during DT walking. To further estimate associations between subject’s gait measures and LTM-LE, we performed stepwise linear regression analyses. During ST, regression did not show significant associations (R2 = 0.17; p = 0.19). In contrast, during DT, regression analysis yielded a significant association between stride time, the CV thereof, and subject’s LTM-LE (R2 = 0.44; p = 0.009; Figure 3A-B).Figure 3


Association of dual-task walking performance and leg muscle quality in healthy children.

Beurskens R, Muehlbauer T, Granacher U - BMC Pediatr (2015)

Correlations of subject’s leg lean tissue mass with stride time (A) and CV of stride time (B). Regression analysis yielded significant associations between stride time, the CV thereof, and subject’s LTM-LE (R2 = 0.44; p = 0.009) during dual-task walking.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325950&req=5

Fig3: Correlations of subject’s leg lean tissue mass with stride time (A) and CV of stride time (B). Regression analysis yielded significant associations between stride time, the CV thereof, and subject’s LTM-LE (R2 = 0.44; p = 0.009) during dual-task walking.
Mentions: Pearson’s correlation analyses with Bonferroni-corrected p-values of LTM-LE and measures of gait indicated non-significant, small sized correlations, irrespective of the measure considered. Furthermore, LTM-LE was not significantly correlated with age (r = 0.37; p = 0.1). Of note, we observed an unequivocal tendency indicating that participants with less LTM-LE walked slower (r = 0.41; p = 0.42) and took shorter steps (r = −0.43; p = 0.35) with larger variability of gait velocity (r = −0.38; p = 0.54), and stride time (r = −0.56; p = 0.07) during DT walking. To further estimate associations between subject’s gait measures and LTM-LE, we performed stepwise linear regression analyses. During ST, regression did not show significant associations (R2 = 0.17; p = 0.19). In contrast, during DT, regression analysis yielded a significant association between stride time, the CV thereof, and subject’s LTM-LE (R2 = 0.44; p = 0.009; Figure 3A-B).Figure 3

Bottom Line: Findings show that both, boys and girls, significantly decrease their gait velocity (f = 0.73), stride length (f = 0.62) and cadence (f = 0.68) and increase the variability thereof (f = 0.20-0.63) during DT compared to ST.We were able to show a potential link between leg muscular capacities and DT walking performance in children.We interpret these findings as evidence that higher leg muscle mass in children may mitigate the impact of a cognitive interference task on DT walking performance by inducing enhanced gait stability.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health and Sports Sciences, Division of Training and Movement Sciences, Research Focus Cognition Sciences, University of Potsdam, Am Neuen Palais 10, Bldg. 12, D-14469, Potsdam, Germany. rbeurskens@posteo.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous literature mainly introduced cognitive functions to explain performance decrements in dual-task walking, i.e., changes in dual-task locomotion are attributed to limited cognitive information processing capacities. In this study, we enlarge existing literature and investigate whether leg muscular capacity plays an additional role in children's dual-task walking performance.

Methods: To this end, we had prepubescent children (mean age: 8.7 ± 0.5 years, age range: 7-9 years) walk in single task (ST) and while concurrently conducting an arithmetic subtraction task (DT). Additionally, leg lean tissue mass was assessed.

Results: Findings show that both, boys and girls, significantly decrease their gait velocity (f = 0.73), stride length (f = 0.62) and cadence (f = 0.68) and increase the variability thereof (f = 0.20-0.63) during DT compared to ST. Furthermore, stepwise regressions indicate that leg lean tissue mass is closely associated with step time and the variability thereof during DT (R(2) = 0.44, p = 0.009). These associations between gait measures and leg lean tissue mass could not be observed for ST (R(2) = 0.17, p = 0.19).

Conclusion: We were able to show a potential link between leg muscular capacities and DT walking performance in children. We interpret these findings as evidence that higher leg muscle mass in children may mitigate the impact of a cognitive interference task on DT walking performance by inducing enhanced gait stability.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus