Limits...
Association of dual-task walking performance and leg muscle quality in healthy children.

Beurskens R, Muehlbauer T, Granacher U - BMC Pediatr (2015)

Bottom Line: Findings show that both, boys and girls, significantly decrease their gait velocity (f = 0.73), stride length (f = 0.62) and cadence (f = 0.68) and increase the variability thereof (f = 0.20-0.63) during DT compared to ST.We were able to show a potential link between leg muscular capacities and DT walking performance in children.We interpret these findings as evidence that higher leg muscle mass in children may mitigate the impact of a cognitive interference task on DT walking performance by inducing enhanced gait stability.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health and Sports Sciences, Division of Training and Movement Sciences, Research Focus Cognition Sciences, University of Potsdam, Am Neuen Palais 10, Bldg. 12, D-14469, Potsdam, Germany. rbeurskens@posteo.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous literature mainly introduced cognitive functions to explain performance decrements in dual-task walking, i.e., changes in dual-task locomotion are attributed to limited cognitive information processing capacities. In this study, we enlarge existing literature and investigate whether leg muscular capacity plays an additional role in children's dual-task walking performance.

Methods: To this end, we had prepubescent children (mean age: 8.7 ± 0.5 years, age range: 7-9 years) walk in single task (ST) and while concurrently conducting an arithmetic subtraction task (DT). Additionally, leg lean tissue mass was assessed.

Results: Findings show that both, boys and girls, significantly decrease their gait velocity (f = 0.73), stride length (f = 0.62) and cadence (f = 0.68) and increase the variability thereof (f = 0.20-0.63) during DT compared to ST. Furthermore, stepwise regressions indicate that leg lean tissue mass is closely associated with step time and the variability thereof during DT (R(2) = 0.44, p = 0.009). These associations between gait measures and leg lean tissue mass could not be observed for ST (R(2) = 0.17, p = 0.19).

Conclusion: We were able to show a potential link between leg muscular capacities and DT walking performance in children. We interpret these findings as evidence that higher leg muscle mass in children may mitigate the impact of a cognitive interference task on DT walking performance by inducing enhanced gait stability.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Coefficient of variation (CV) for three stride-related gait measures (A: CV - gait velocity, B: CV - stride length, C: CV - stride time) and each walking condition separately. Asterisks show significance levels (***, **, *, n.s. represents p < 0.001, p < 0.01, p < 0.05, and non-significant [p > 0.05], respectively). Effect size (f) is displayed in brackets. ST = single-task walking; DT = dual-task walking.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325950&req=5

Fig2: Coefficient of variation (CV) for three stride-related gait measures (A: CV - gait velocity, B: CV - stride length, C: CV - stride time) and each walking condition separately. Asterisks show significance levels (***, **, *, n.s. represents p < 0.001, p < 0.01, p < 0.05, and non-significant [p > 0.05], respectively). Effect size (f) is displayed in brackets. ST = single-task walking; DT = dual-task walking.

Mentions: Figure 1A-D display means and SDs of our 4 measures of walking performance and Figure 2A-C show the respective CV measures for gait velocity, stride length, and stride time; separately for each walking condition. The corresponding ANOVA outcomes are displayed in Table 2.Figure 1


Association of dual-task walking performance and leg muscle quality in healthy children.

Beurskens R, Muehlbauer T, Granacher U - BMC Pediatr (2015)

Coefficient of variation (CV) for three stride-related gait measures (A: CV - gait velocity, B: CV - stride length, C: CV - stride time) and each walking condition separately. Asterisks show significance levels (***, **, *, n.s. represents p < 0.001, p < 0.01, p < 0.05, and non-significant [p > 0.05], respectively). Effect size (f) is displayed in brackets. ST = single-task walking; DT = dual-task walking.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325950&req=5

Fig2: Coefficient of variation (CV) for three stride-related gait measures (A: CV - gait velocity, B: CV - stride length, C: CV - stride time) and each walking condition separately. Asterisks show significance levels (***, **, *, n.s. represents p < 0.001, p < 0.01, p < 0.05, and non-significant [p > 0.05], respectively). Effect size (f) is displayed in brackets. ST = single-task walking; DT = dual-task walking.
Mentions: Figure 1A-D display means and SDs of our 4 measures of walking performance and Figure 2A-C show the respective CV measures for gait velocity, stride length, and stride time; separately for each walking condition. The corresponding ANOVA outcomes are displayed in Table 2.Figure 1

Bottom Line: Findings show that both, boys and girls, significantly decrease their gait velocity (f = 0.73), stride length (f = 0.62) and cadence (f = 0.68) and increase the variability thereof (f = 0.20-0.63) during DT compared to ST.We were able to show a potential link between leg muscular capacities and DT walking performance in children.We interpret these findings as evidence that higher leg muscle mass in children may mitigate the impact of a cognitive interference task on DT walking performance by inducing enhanced gait stability.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health and Sports Sciences, Division of Training and Movement Sciences, Research Focus Cognition Sciences, University of Potsdam, Am Neuen Palais 10, Bldg. 12, D-14469, Potsdam, Germany. rbeurskens@posteo.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous literature mainly introduced cognitive functions to explain performance decrements in dual-task walking, i.e., changes in dual-task locomotion are attributed to limited cognitive information processing capacities. In this study, we enlarge existing literature and investigate whether leg muscular capacity plays an additional role in children's dual-task walking performance.

Methods: To this end, we had prepubescent children (mean age: 8.7 ± 0.5 years, age range: 7-9 years) walk in single task (ST) and while concurrently conducting an arithmetic subtraction task (DT). Additionally, leg lean tissue mass was assessed.

Results: Findings show that both, boys and girls, significantly decrease their gait velocity (f = 0.73), stride length (f = 0.62) and cadence (f = 0.68) and increase the variability thereof (f = 0.20-0.63) during DT compared to ST. Furthermore, stepwise regressions indicate that leg lean tissue mass is closely associated with step time and the variability thereof during DT (R(2) = 0.44, p = 0.009). These associations between gait measures and leg lean tissue mass could not be observed for ST (R(2) = 0.17, p = 0.19).

Conclusion: We were able to show a potential link between leg muscular capacities and DT walking performance in children. We interpret these findings as evidence that higher leg muscle mass in children may mitigate the impact of a cognitive interference task on DT walking performance by inducing enhanced gait stability.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus