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The neural basis of deception in strategic interactions.

Volz KG, Vogeley K, Tittgemeyer M, von Cramon DY, Sutter M - Front Behav Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Notably, our design also allows for an investigation of the neural foundations of sophisticated deception through telling the truth-when the sender does not expect the receiver to believe her (true) message.Sophisticated deception triggers activation within the same network as plain lies, i.e., we find activity within the rTPJ, the CUN, and aFG.We take this result to show that brain activation can reveal the sender's veridical intention to deceive others, irrespective of whether in fact the sender utters the factual truth or not.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Werner Reichardt Centre for Integrative Neuroscience Tübingen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Communication based on informational asymmetries abounds in politics, business, and almost any other form of social interaction. Informational asymmetries may create incentives for the better-informed party to exploit her advantage by misrepresenting information. Using a game-theoretic setting, we investigate the neural basis of deception in human interaction. Unlike in most previous fMRI research on deception, the participants decide themselves whether to lie or not. We find activation within the right temporo-parietal junction (rTPJ), the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), the (pre)cuneus (CUN), and the anterior frontal gyrus (aFG) when contrasting lying with truth telling. Notably, our design also allows for an investigation of the neural foundations of sophisticated deception through telling the truth-when the sender does not expect the receiver to believe her (true) message. Sophisticated deception triggers activation within the same network as plain lies, i.e., we find activity within the rTPJ, the CUN, and aFG. We take this result to show that brain activation can reveal the sender's veridical intention to deceive others, irrespective of whether in fact the sender utters the factual truth or not.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Upper Panel: Delineating the two forms of deception: Results are shown for the contrast sophisticated deception trials vs. simple deception trials. Lower Panel: Parametric analysis modeling the incentive to deceive for simple deception trials: Results are shown for the positive correlational analysis, i.e., the activation is stronger the higher the conflict and thus the tension in payoffs between sender and receiver. Abbreviations: aFG, anterior frontal gyrus; amPFC, anterior median prefrontal cortex; dACC, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex; lSTG, left superior temporal gyrus; lTPJ, left temporo-parietal junction; MTG, middle temporal gyrus. For visualization, a threshold of 99.4% was applied to the probability maps.
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Figure 4: Upper Panel: Delineating the two forms of deception: Results are shown for the contrast sophisticated deception trials vs. simple deception trials. Lower Panel: Parametric analysis modeling the incentive to deceive for simple deception trials: Results are shown for the positive correlational analysis, i.e., the activation is stronger the higher the conflict and thus the tension in payoffs between sender and receiver. Abbreviations: aFG, anterior frontal gyrus; amPFC, anterior median prefrontal cortex; dACC, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex; lSTG, left superior temporal gyrus; lTPJ, left temporo-parietal junction; MTG, middle temporal gyrus. For visualization, a threshold of 99.4% was applied to the probability maps.

Mentions: To test for the differences between the two forms of deception, we contrasted sophisticated deception trials with simple deception trials. We find activation bilaterally within the TPJ, the right middle temporal gyrus, the left superior temporal gyrus, the left frontal operculum, and within the mid-cingulate gyrus (see Table 6 and Figure 4, upper panel).


The neural basis of deception in strategic interactions.

Volz KG, Vogeley K, Tittgemeyer M, von Cramon DY, Sutter M - Front Behav Neurosci (2015)

Upper Panel: Delineating the two forms of deception: Results are shown for the contrast sophisticated deception trials vs. simple deception trials. Lower Panel: Parametric analysis modeling the incentive to deceive for simple deception trials: Results are shown for the positive correlational analysis, i.e., the activation is stronger the higher the conflict and thus the tension in payoffs between sender and receiver. Abbreviations: aFG, anterior frontal gyrus; amPFC, anterior median prefrontal cortex; dACC, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex; lSTG, left superior temporal gyrus; lTPJ, left temporo-parietal junction; MTG, middle temporal gyrus. For visualization, a threshold of 99.4% was applied to the probability maps.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325923&req=5

Figure 4: Upper Panel: Delineating the two forms of deception: Results are shown for the contrast sophisticated deception trials vs. simple deception trials. Lower Panel: Parametric analysis modeling the incentive to deceive for simple deception trials: Results are shown for the positive correlational analysis, i.e., the activation is stronger the higher the conflict and thus the tension in payoffs between sender and receiver. Abbreviations: aFG, anterior frontal gyrus; amPFC, anterior median prefrontal cortex; dACC, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex; lSTG, left superior temporal gyrus; lTPJ, left temporo-parietal junction; MTG, middle temporal gyrus. For visualization, a threshold of 99.4% was applied to the probability maps.
Mentions: To test for the differences between the two forms of deception, we contrasted sophisticated deception trials with simple deception trials. We find activation bilaterally within the TPJ, the right middle temporal gyrus, the left superior temporal gyrus, the left frontal operculum, and within the mid-cingulate gyrus (see Table 6 and Figure 4, upper panel).

Bottom Line: Notably, our design also allows for an investigation of the neural foundations of sophisticated deception through telling the truth-when the sender does not expect the receiver to believe her (true) message.Sophisticated deception triggers activation within the same network as plain lies, i.e., we find activity within the rTPJ, the CUN, and aFG.We take this result to show that brain activation can reveal the sender's veridical intention to deceive others, irrespective of whether in fact the sender utters the factual truth or not.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Werner Reichardt Centre for Integrative Neuroscience Tübingen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Communication based on informational asymmetries abounds in politics, business, and almost any other form of social interaction. Informational asymmetries may create incentives for the better-informed party to exploit her advantage by misrepresenting information. Using a game-theoretic setting, we investigate the neural basis of deception in human interaction. Unlike in most previous fMRI research on deception, the participants decide themselves whether to lie or not. We find activation within the right temporo-parietal junction (rTPJ), the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), the (pre)cuneus (CUN), and the anterior frontal gyrus (aFG) when contrasting lying with truth telling. Notably, our design also allows for an investigation of the neural foundations of sophisticated deception through telling the truth-when the sender does not expect the receiver to believe her (true) message. Sophisticated deception triggers activation within the same network as plain lies, i.e., we find activity within the rTPJ, the CUN, and aFG. We take this result to show that brain activation can reveal the sender's veridical intention to deceive others, irrespective of whether in fact the sender utters the factual truth or not.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus