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The effect of low-frequency sound stimulation on patients with fibromyalgia: a clinical study.

Naghdi L, Ahonen H, Macario P, Bartel L - Pain Res Manag (2014)

Bottom Line: The search for effective treatments for fibromyalgia (FM) has continued for years.Medication dose was reduced in 73.68% of patients and completely discontinued in 26.32%.Time sitting and standing without pain increased significantly (P<0.0001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The search for effective treatments for fibromyalgia (FM) has continued for years. The present study premises that thalamocortical dysrhythmia is implicated in fibromyalgia and that low-frequency sound stimulation (LFSS) can play a regulatory function by driving neural rhythmic oscillatory activity.

Objective: To assess the effect of LFSS on FM.

Method: The present open-label study with no control group used a repeated-measures design with no noncompleters. Nineteen female volunteers (median age 51 years; median duration of FM 5.76 years) were administered 10 treatments (twice per week for five weeks). Treatments involved 23 min of LFSS at 40 Hz, delivered using transducers in a supine position. Measures (repeated before and after treatment) included the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Jenkins Sleep Scale, Pain Disability Index, sitting and standing without pain (in minutes), cervical muscle range of motion and muscle tone. Mean percentages were calculated on end of treatment self-reports of improvement on pain, mood, insomnia and activities of daily living.

Results: Significant improvements were observed with median scores: Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, 81% (P<0.0001); Jenkins Sleep Scale, 90% (P<0.0001); and Pain Disability Index, 49.1% (P<0.0001). Medication dose was reduced in 73.68% of patients and completely discontinued in 26.32%. Time sitting and standing without pain increased significantly (P<0.0001). Cervical muscle range of motion increased from 25% to 75% (P=0.001), while muscle tone changed from hypertonic to normal (P=0.0002).

Conclusion: In the present study, the LFSS treatment showed no adverse effects and patients receiving the LFSS treatment showed statistically and clinically relevant improvement. Further phase 2 and 3 trials are warranted.

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Jenkins Sleep Scale (JSS) before and after comparison
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f2-prm-20-e21: Jenkins Sleep Scale (JSS) before and after comparison

Mentions: Highly significant results were found in the present study; thus, caution needs to be taken in interpretation and we urge follow-up research with a blinded controlled trial. Pain is a highly subjective experience and difficult to measure objectively. The impact of pain is more amenable to measurement; therefore, three measures of the impact of pain were used: the FIQ, JSS and PDI. Table 2 presents the before-treatment (score 88.8) to after-treatment (score 16.8) reduction in pain impact (81%) measured using the FIQ, which was statistically significant (P<0.0001; WSR). A comparable impact was measured using the PDI (Table 3) with a 49% before-after treatment reduction (P<0.0001; WSR). Sleep is strongly affected by FM, with some studies reporting 90% of patients having disturbed sleep (92,93). The before-treatment JSS median score of 20 was reduced after treatment to 2, an improvement of 90% (P<0.0001; WSR) (Table 1). Figures 1 and 2 graphically illustrate the changes in FIQ and JSS. Although the after-treatment scores are significantly different than before treatment, there is less uniformity in the ‘after’ scores, as indicated by the greater scatter in Figures 1 and 2 and by the higher SDs in Table 1.


The effect of low-frequency sound stimulation on patients with fibromyalgia: a clinical study.

Naghdi L, Ahonen H, Macario P, Bartel L - Pain Res Manag (2014)

Jenkins Sleep Scale (JSS) before and after comparison
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325896&req=5

f2-prm-20-e21: Jenkins Sleep Scale (JSS) before and after comparison
Mentions: Highly significant results were found in the present study; thus, caution needs to be taken in interpretation and we urge follow-up research with a blinded controlled trial. Pain is a highly subjective experience and difficult to measure objectively. The impact of pain is more amenable to measurement; therefore, three measures of the impact of pain were used: the FIQ, JSS and PDI. Table 2 presents the before-treatment (score 88.8) to after-treatment (score 16.8) reduction in pain impact (81%) measured using the FIQ, which was statistically significant (P<0.0001; WSR). A comparable impact was measured using the PDI (Table 3) with a 49% before-after treatment reduction (P<0.0001; WSR). Sleep is strongly affected by FM, with some studies reporting 90% of patients having disturbed sleep (92,93). The before-treatment JSS median score of 20 was reduced after treatment to 2, an improvement of 90% (P<0.0001; WSR) (Table 1). Figures 1 and 2 graphically illustrate the changes in FIQ and JSS. Although the after-treatment scores are significantly different than before treatment, there is less uniformity in the ‘after’ scores, as indicated by the greater scatter in Figures 1 and 2 and by the higher SDs in Table 1.

Bottom Line: The search for effective treatments for fibromyalgia (FM) has continued for years.Medication dose was reduced in 73.68% of patients and completely discontinued in 26.32%.Time sitting and standing without pain increased significantly (P<0.0001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The search for effective treatments for fibromyalgia (FM) has continued for years. The present study premises that thalamocortical dysrhythmia is implicated in fibromyalgia and that low-frequency sound stimulation (LFSS) can play a regulatory function by driving neural rhythmic oscillatory activity.

Objective: To assess the effect of LFSS on FM.

Method: The present open-label study with no control group used a repeated-measures design with no noncompleters. Nineteen female volunteers (median age 51 years; median duration of FM 5.76 years) were administered 10 treatments (twice per week for five weeks). Treatments involved 23 min of LFSS at 40 Hz, delivered using transducers in a supine position. Measures (repeated before and after treatment) included the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Jenkins Sleep Scale, Pain Disability Index, sitting and standing without pain (in minutes), cervical muscle range of motion and muscle tone. Mean percentages were calculated on end of treatment self-reports of improvement on pain, mood, insomnia and activities of daily living.

Results: Significant improvements were observed with median scores: Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, 81% (P<0.0001); Jenkins Sleep Scale, 90% (P<0.0001); and Pain Disability Index, 49.1% (P<0.0001). Medication dose was reduced in 73.68% of patients and completely discontinued in 26.32%. Time sitting and standing without pain increased significantly (P<0.0001). Cervical muscle range of motion increased from 25% to 75% (P=0.001), while muscle tone changed from hypertonic to normal (P=0.0002).

Conclusion: In the present study, the LFSS treatment showed no adverse effects and patients receiving the LFSS treatment showed statistically and clinically relevant improvement. Further phase 2 and 3 trials are warranted.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus