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Chicken and duck myotubes are highly susceptible and permissive to influenza virus infection.

Baquero-Perez B, Kuchipudi SV, Ho J, Sebastian S, Puranik A, Howard W, Brookes SM, Brown IH, Chang KC - J. Virol. (2014)

Bottom Line: Besides its primary function in movement and posture, skeletal muscle is a significant innate immune organ with the capacity to produce cytokines and chemokines and respond to proinflammatory cytokines.Infected chicken myotubes produced significantly higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines than did the corresponding duck cells.Our results indicate that avian skeletal muscle fibers of chicken and duck could be significant contributors to progeny production of highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom.

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Avian influenza virus-infected chicken and duck myotubes show comparable progeny virus outputs and similar reductions in cell viability. (A) One LPAI H2N3 and two HPAI H5N1 viruses at a MOI of 1.0 conferred higher levels of accumulation of M gene RNA in duck than in chicken myotubes (*, P < 0.05; **, P < 0.005 [determined by an unpaired t test]); however, comparable increasing outputs of progeny H5N1 tyTy05 virus were detected for both avian species, based on TCID50 virus assays using infected supernatants on MDCK cells (*, P < 0.05 [determined by a two-sample t test]). (B) Chicken and duck myotubes infected at a MOI of 1.0 for 24 h displayed a significant reduction in cell viability based on MTT assays (**, P < 0.005 [determined by an unpaired t test]). There was no significant difference in reduced viability between infected chicken and infected duck myotubes. Data points are the means of data from four wells of a 96-well plate, with error bars indicating standard deviations.
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Figure 3: Avian influenza virus-infected chicken and duck myotubes show comparable progeny virus outputs and similar reductions in cell viability. (A) One LPAI H2N3 and two HPAI H5N1 viruses at a MOI of 1.0 conferred higher levels of accumulation of M gene RNA in duck than in chicken myotubes (*, P < 0.05; **, P < 0.005 [determined by an unpaired t test]); however, comparable increasing outputs of progeny H5N1 tyTy05 virus were detected for both avian species, based on TCID50 virus assays using infected supernatants on MDCK cells (*, P < 0.05 [determined by a two-sample t test]). (B) Chicken and duck myotubes infected at a MOI of 1.0 for 24 h displayed a significant reduction in cell viability based on MTT assays (**, P < 0.005 [determined by an unpaired t test]). There was no significant difference in reduced viability between infected chicken and infected duck myotubes. Data points are the means of data from four wells of a 96-well plate, with error bars indicating standard deviations.

Mentions: Chicken and duck myotubes were infected with three different avian influenza viruses (LPAI H2N3, HPAI H5N1 50-92, and HPAI H5N1 tyTy05) at a MOI of 1.0 over a period of 24 h. Viral M gene RNA accumulation, normalized to 18S rRNA, in duck myotubes was consistently higher than that in the corresponding chicken myotubes for all three viruses (Fig. 3A); a similar relative difference in M gene expression was also found for influenza virus-infected duck and chicken primary fibroblasts (our unpublished data). However, both chicken and duck myotubes infected with H5N1 tyTy05 virus at a MOI of 1.0 produced comparable increasing levels of progeny virus from 8 to 24 h of infection (Fig. 3A). MTT assays to determine the resulting metabolic rates (cell viability) at 24 h p.i. showed similar reductions in infected chicken and infected duck myotubes (Fig. 3B). Therefore, infected chicken and duck myotubes showed similar reductions in cell viability and were comparably permissive to the production of viable H5N1 tyTy05 progeny virus.


Chicken and duck myotubes are highly susceptible and permissive to influenza virus infection.

Baquero-Perez B, Kuchipudi SV, Ho J, Sebastian S, Puranik A, Howard W, Brookes SM, Brown IH, Chang KC - J. Virol. (2014)

Avian influenza virus-infected chicken and duck myotubes show comparable progeny virus outputs and similar reductions in cell viability. (A) One LPAI H2N3 and two HPAI H5N1 viruses at a MOI of 1.0 conferred higher levels of accumulation of M gene RNA in duck than in chicken myotubes (*, P < 0.05; **, P < 0.005 [determined by an unpaired t test]); however, comparable increasing outputs of progeny H5N1 tyTy05 virus were detected for both avian species, based on TCID50 virus assays using infected supernatants on MDCK cells (*, P < 0.05 [determined by a two-sample t test]). (B) Chicken and duck myotubes infected at a MOI of 1.0 for 24 h displayed a significant reduction in cell viability based on MTT assays (**, P < 0.005 [determined by an unpaired t test]). There was no significant difference in reduced viability between infected chicken and infected duck myotubes. Data points are the means of data from four wells of a 96-well plate, with error bars indicating standard deviations.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 3: Avian influenza virus-infected chicken and duck myotubes show comparable progeny virus outputs and similar reductions in cell viability. (A) One LPAI H2N3 and two HPAI H5N1 viruses at a MOI of 1.0 conferred higher levels of accumulation of M gene RNA in duck than in chicken myotubes (*, P < 0.05; **, P < 0.005 [determined by an unpaired t test]); however, comparable increasing outputs of progeny H5N1 tyTy05 virus were detected for both avian species, based on TCID50 virus assays using infected supernatants on MDCK cells (*, P < 0.05 [determined by a two-sample t test]). (B) Chicken and duck myotubes infected at a MOI of 1.0 for 24 h displayed a significant reduction in cell viability based on MTT assays (**, P < 0.005 [determined by an unpaired t test]). There was no significant difference in reduced viability between infected chicken and infected duck myotubes. Data points are the means of data from four wells of a 96-well plate, with error bars indicating standard deviations.
Mentions: Chicken and duck myotubes were infected with three different avian influenza viruses (LPAI H2N3, HPAI H5N1 50-92, and HPAI H5N1 tyTy05) at a MOI of 1.0 over a period of 24 h. Viral M gene RNA accumulation, normalized to 18S rRNA, in duck myotubes was consistently higher than that in the corresponding chicken myotubes for all three viruses (Fig. 3A); a similar relative difference in M gene expression was also found for influenza virus-infected duck and chicken primary fibroblasts (our unpublished data). However, both chicken and duck myotubes infected with H5N1 tyTy05 virus at a MOI of 1.0 produced comparable increasing levels of progeny virus from 8 to 24 h of infection (Fig. 3A). MTT assays to determine the resulting metabolic rates (cell viability) at 24 h p.i. showed similar reductions in infected chicken and infected duck myotubes (Fig. 3B). Therefore, infected chicken and duck myotubes showed similar reductions in cell viability and were comparably permissive to the production of viable H5N1 tyTy05 progeny virus.

Bottom Line: Besides its primary function in movement and posture, skeletal muscle is a significant innate immune organ with the capacity to produce cytokines and chemokines and respond to proinflammatory cytokines.Infected chicken myotubes produced significantly higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines than did the corresponding duck cells.Our results indicate that avian skeletal muscle fibers of chicken and duck could be significant contributors to progeny production of highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus