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Analysis of the early immune response to infection by infectious bursal disease virus in chickens differing in their resistance to the disease.

Smith J, Sadeyen JR, Butter C, Kaiser P, Burt DW - J. Virol. (2014)

Bottom Line: There is thus an urgent need to explore new control solutions, one of which would be to breed birds with greater resistance to IBD.This goal is perhaps uniquely achievable with poultry, of all farm animal species, since the genetics of 85% of the 60 billion chickens produced worldwide each year is under the control of essentially two breeding companies.In a comprehensive study, we attempt here to identify global transcriptomic differences in the target organ of the virus between chicken lines that differ in resistance and to predict candidate resistance genes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Roslin Institute and R(D)SVS, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush, Midlothian, United Kingdom jacqueline.smith@roslin.ed.ac.uk.

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IPA results for the host response to IBDV infection. (A) The most highly represented (P < 0.05) physiological functions as revealed after IPA was used to evaluate genes differentially expressed during the host response to IBDV (in the spleen). Specific functions within groups are highlighted. (B) The most highly represented canonical pathways as revealed after IPA was used to evaluate genes differentially expressed during the host response to IBDV (in the spleen). The line represents the ratio of genes represented within each pathway.
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Figure 6: IPA results for the host response to IBDV infection. (A) The most highly represented (P < 0.05) physiological functions as revealed after IPA was used to evaluate genes differentially expressed during the host response to IBDV (in the spleen). Specific functions within groups are highlighted. (B) The most highly represented canonical pathways as revealed after IPA was used to evaluate genes differentially expressed during the host response to IBDV (in the spleen). The line represents the ratio of genes represented within each pathway.

Mentions: Complementing the findings from Pathway Express, IPA was also used to identify the physiological functions and biological pathways most highly involved during the host response to IBDV infection. The most significant physiological functions are represented in Fig. 6A. It can be clearly seen that processes involving B and T cell development and differentiation constitute many of the pathways highlighted. Tissue development, necrosis, and mortality all seem to play an important role during IBDV infection. Pathways affected by IBDV infection are shown in Fig. 6B. Among the upregulated genes, those involved in signaling from several cytokine receptors (IFN, IL-6, IL-10, and GM-CSF/CSF-2), as well as in apoptosis, were differentially expressed. Genes involved in the activation of hepatic stellate cells were also differentially expressed. Interestingly, Ma et al. (26) recently described the effects of IBDV on Kupffer cells, macrophages found in the lining of the liver, suggesting that the liver is a site of IBDV infection and therefore possibly the innate immune response. Analysis of the downregulated genes highlights genes that are involved in endothelial cell development, proliferation, and migration.


Analysis of the early immune response to infection by infectious bursal disease virus in chickens differing in their resistance to the disease.

Smith J, Sadeyen JR, Butter C, Kaiser P, Burt DW - J. Virol. (2014)

IPA results for the host response to IBDV infection. (A) The most highly represented (P < 0.05) physiological functions as revealed after IPA was used to evaluate genes differentially expressed during the host response to IBDV (in the spleen). Specific functions within groups are highlighted. (B) The most highly represented canonical pathways as revealed after IPA was used to evaluate genes differentially expressed during the host response to IBDV (in the spleen). The line represents the ratio of genes represented within each pathway.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325706&req=5

Figure 6: IPA results for the host response to IBDV infection. (A) The most highly represented (P < 0.05) physiological functions as revealed after IPA was used to evaluate genes differentially expressed during the host response to IBDV (in the spleen). Specific functions within groups are highlighted. (B) The most highly represented canonical pathways as revealed after IPA was used to evaluate genes differentially expressed during the host response to IBDV (in the spleen). The line represents the ratio of genes represented within each pathway.
Mentions: Complementing the findings from Pathway Express, IPA was also used to identify the physiological functions and biological pathways most highly involved during the host response to IBDV infection. The most significant physiological functions are represented in Fig. 6A. It can be clearly seen that processes involving B and T cell development and differentiation constitute many of the pathways highlighted. Tissue development, necrosis, and mortality all seem to play an important role during IBDV infection. Pathways affected by IBDV infection are shown in Fig. 6B. Among the upregulated genes, those involved in signaling from several cytokine receptors (IFN, IL-6, IL-10, and GM-CSF/CSF-2), as well as in apoptosis, were differentially expressed. Genes involved in the activation of hepatic stellate cells were also differentially expressed. Interestingly, Ma et al. (26) recently described the effects of IBDV on Kupffer cells, macrophages found in the lining of the liver, suggesting that the liver is a site of IBDV infection and therefore possibly the innate immune response. Analysis of the downregulated genes highlights genes that are involved in endothelial cell development, proliferation, and migration.

Bottom Line: There is thus an urgent need to explore new control solutions, one of which would be to breed birds with greater resistance to IBD.This goal is perhaps uniquely achievable with poultry, of all farm animal species, since the genetics of 85% of the 60 billion chickens produced worldwide each year is under the control of essentially two breeding companies.In a comprehensive study, we attempt here to identify global transcriptomic differences in the target organ of the virus between chicken lines that differ in resistance and to predict candidate resistance genes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Roslin Institute and R(D)SVS, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush, Midlothian, United Kingdom jacqueline.smith@roslin.ed.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus