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Analysis of the early immune response to infection by infectious bursal disease virus in chickens differing in their resistance to the disease.

Smith J, Sadeyen JR, Butter C, Kaiser P, Burt DW - J. Virol. (2014)

Bottom Line: There is thus an urgent need to explore new control solutions, one of which would be to breed birds with greater resistance to IBD.This goal is perhaps uniquely achievable with poultry, of all farm animal species, since the genetics of 85% of the 60 billion chickens produced worldwide each year is under the control of essentially two breeding companies.In a comprehensive study, we attempt here to identify global transcriptomic differences in the target organ of the virus between chicken lines that differ in resistance and to predict candidate resistance genes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Roslin Institute and R(D)SVS, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush, Midlothian, United Kingdom jacqueline.smith@roslin.ed.ac.uk.

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(A and B) Bursal load of IBDV (corrected 40-CT ± the standard errors) (A) and bursal damage scores (B) at various times postinfection with virulent (F52/70) IBDV. C = control, uninfected; I = infected; 6 = resistant line 61 chickens; BrL = susceptible Brown Leghorn chickens. n = 9 birds per group per time point.
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Figure 1: (A and B) Bursal load of IBDV (corrected 40-CT ± the standard errors) (A) and bursal damage scores (B) at various times postinfection with virulent (F52/70) IBDV. C = control, uninfected; I = infected; 6 = resistant line 61 chickens; BrL = susceptible Brown Leghorn chickens. n = 9 birds per group per time point.

Mentions: After challenge of the two inbred lines, TaqMan analysis was used to measure viral load in bursal samples from control and infected birds from both lines. It became immediately obvious on analyzing the viral load data that the respective phenotype of the two lines (BrL susceptible and line 61 resistant) had reversed since the lines were last studied in previous decades (13, 14). In repeated experiments, the line 61 birds were susceptible and the BrL birds were highly resistant, with only the odd BrL bird showing detectable viral load in the bursa postchallenge (Fig. 1A). In terms of bursal damage, all control birds had no signs of bursal damage, whereas all infected birds had some bursal damage (Fig. 1B). At 3 and 4 dpi, high bursal viral loads in the line 61 birds correlated with high bursal damage scores, whereas bursal damage scores in infected BrL birds remained low (Fig. 2).


Analysis of the early immune response to infection by infectious bursal disease virus in chickens differing in their resistance to the disease.

Smith J, Sadeyen JR, Butter C, Kaiser P, Burt DW - J. Virol. (2014)

(A and B) Bursal load of IBDV (corrected 40-CT ± the standard errors) (A) and bursal damage scores (B) at various times postinfection with virulent (F52/70) IBDV. C = control, uninfected; I = infected; 6 = resistant line 61 chickens; BrL = susceptible Brown Leghorn chickens. n = 9 birds per group per time point.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325706&req=5

Figure 1: (A and B) Bursal load of IBDV (corrected 40-CT ± the standard errors) (A) and bursal damage scores (B) at various times postinfection with virulent (F52/70) IBDV. C = control, uninfected; I = infected; 6 = resistant line 61 chickens; BrL = susceptible Brown Leghorn chickens. n = 9 birds per group per time point.
Mentions: After challenge of the two inbred lines, TaqMan analysis was used to measure viral load in bursal samples from control and infected birds from both lines. It became immediately obvious on analyzing the viral load data that the respective phenotype of the two lines (BrL susceptible and line 61 resistant) had reversed since the lines were last studied in previous decades (13, 14). In repeated experiments, the line 61 birds were susceptible and the BrL birds were highly resistant, with only the odd BrL bird showing detectable viral load in the bursa postchallenge (Fig. 1A). In terms of bursal damage, all control birds had no signs of bursal damage, whereas all infected birds had some bursal damage (Fig. 1B). At 3 and 4 dpi, high bursal viral loads in the line 61 birds correlated with high bursal damage scores, whereas bursal damage scores in infected BrL birds remained low (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: There is thus an urgent need to explore new control solutions, one of which would be to breed birds with greater resistance to IBD.This goal is perhaps uniquely achievable with poultry, of all farm animal species, since the genetics of 85% of the 60 billion chickens produced worldwide each year is under the control of essentially two breeding companies.In a comprehensive study, we attempt here to identify global transcriptomic differences in the target organ of the virus between chicken lines that differ in resistance and to predict candidate resistance genes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Roslin Institute and R(D)SVS, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush, Midlothian, United Kingdom jacqueline.smith@roslin.ed.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus