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Evolving clonal nevus-case report with serial digital dermatoscopy and dermatopathology.

Inskip M, Magee J - Dermatol Pract Concept (2015)

Bottom Line: We present a case of a clonal nevus arising from a previously banal melanocytic nevus over a 15-month period on the central back of a 30-year-old woman in a primary care skin cancer practice in Melbourne, Australia.Clinical, dermatoscopic and dermatopathologic images are presented.A search of the literature has discovered no previously published dermatoscopy images of an evolving clonal nevus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sun Patrol Skin Care Cancer Clinic, Berwick, Australia.

ABSTRACT
We present a case of a clonal nevus arising from a previously banal melanocytic nevus over a 15-month period on the central back of a 30-year-old woman in a primary care skin cancer practice in Melbourne, Australia. Clinical, dermatoscopic and dermatopathologic images are presented. A search of the literature has discovered no previously published dermatoscopy images of an evolving clonal nevus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

June 2014—Dermatoscopy showing a central focus of blue/grey pigmentation consistent with a clonal nevus. (Copyright: ©2014 Inskip, Magee.)
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f1-dp0501a10: June 2014—Dermatoscopy showing a central focus of blue/grey pigmentation consistent with a clonal nevus. (Copyright: ©2014 Inskip, Magee.)

Mentions: The lesion in question was located on the central back, was slightly domed and measured 6 mm diameter. It was a uniform pale tan color with a centrally located blue, grey circular area 1 mm in diameter (Figure 1). This was consistent with the clinical description of a clonal nevus by Huynh et al, “tan with a focus of blue/grey to blue/black pigmentation” [2]. However, on referring to the digital dermoscopic image of the same lesion taken 15 months earlier, there was no central focus of pigmentation of any kind in this image. There had just been a clinically banal benign melanocytic nevus (Figure 2). The central focus of pigmentation had appeared over the last 15 months. The differential diagnosis thus consisted of benign clonal nevus or possible melanoma in view of the documented changes on serial digital dermatoscopy. In one study, Bolognia et al concluded that “a small percentage of ‘small dark dots’ within melanocytic nevi are due to melanoma”, finding 3 (5%) of 59 such nevi to be melanoma [3]. An excisional biopsy was performed using an 8 mm punch excision, and the specimen was submitted for assessment by a specialist dermatopathologist.


Evolving clonal nevus-case report with serial digital dermatoscopy and dermatopathology.

Inskip M, Magee J - Dermatol Pract Concept (2015)

June 2014—Dermatoscopy showing a central focus of blue/grey pigmentation consistent with a clonal nevus. (Copyright: ©2014 Inskip, Magee.)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325693&req=5

f1-dp0501a10: June 2014—Dermatoscopy showing a central focus of blue/grey pigmentation consistent with a clonal nevus. (Copyright: ©2014 Inskip, Magee.)
Mentions: The lesion in question was located on the central back, was slightly domed and measured 6 mm diameter. It was a uniform pale tan color with a centrally located blue, grey circular area 1 mm in diameter (Figure 1). This was consistent with the clinical description of a clonal nevus by Huynh et al, “tan with a focus of blue/grey to blue/black pigmentation” [2]. However, on referring to the digital dermoscopic image of the same lesion taken 15 months earlier, there was no central focus of pigmentation of any kind in this image. There had just been a clinically banal benign melanocytic nevus (Figure 2). The central focus of pigmentation had appeared over the last 15 months. The differential diagnosis thus consisted of benign clonal nevus or possible melanoma in view of the documented changes on serial digital dermatoscopy. In one study, Bolognia et al concluded that “a small percentage of ‘small dark dots’ within melanocytic nevi are due to melanoma”, finding 3 (5%) of 59 such nevi to be melanoma [3]. An excisional biopsy was performed using an 8 mm punch excision, and the specimen was submitted for assessment by a specialist dermatopathologist.

Bottom Line: We present a case of a clonal nevus arising from a previously banal melanocytic nevus over a 15-month period on the central back of a 30-year-old woman in a primary care skin cancer practice in Melbourne, Australia.Clinical, dermatoscopic and dermatopathologic images are presented.A search of the literature has discovered no previously published dermatoscopy images of an evolving clonal nevus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sun Patrol Skin Care Cancer Clinic, Berwick, Australia.

ABSTRACT
We present a case of a clonal nevus arising from a previously banal melanocytic nevus over a 15-month period on the central back of a 30-year-old woman in a primary care skin cancer practice in Melbourne, Australia. Clinical, dermatoscopic and dermatopathologic images are presented. A search of the literature has discovered no previously published dermatoscopy images of an evolving clonal nevus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus