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Longitudinal systolic blood pressure characteristics and integrity of white matter tracts in a cohort of very old black and white adults.

Rosano C, Abebe KZ, Aizenstein HJ, Boudreau R, Jennings JR, Venkatraman V, Harris TB, Yaffe K, Satterfield S, Newman AB, Health ABC Stu - Am. J. Hypertens. (2014)

Bottom Line: Higher mean SBP was associated with lower white matter integrity in uncinate and superior lateral fasciculi bilaterally, independent of age, stroke history, antihypertensive medication use (odds ratio of having white matter hyperintensities greater than or equal to the median for 10mm Hg of SBP = 10.4, 95% confidence interval = 10.2-10.6, P = 0.0001; standardized beta for fractional anisotropy = -13.54, SE = 4.58, P = 0.003).Associations with gray matter measures were not significant.Whether lowering and/or stabilizing SBP levels in very old adults without a remarkable cardiovascular history would have neuroprotective effects and reduce dementia risk needs further study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; rosanoc@edc.pitt.edu.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Systolic blood pressure (SBP) measures of the 5 groups identified using the group-based trajectory models of repeated SBP measures from study entry in 1997–1998 to time of neuroimaging in 2006–2008. Groups identified using group-based trajectory modeling: group 1 (n = 56; 19%): normal SBP at time of neuroimaging (<120mm Hg), previously stable; group 2 (n = 158; 50%): moderate SBP at time of neuroimaging (120–140 mm Hg), previously stable; group 3 (n = 68; 22%): moderate SBP at time of neuroimaging, previously higher and varying; group 4 (n = 15; 5%): high SBP (>140 and <120), previously stable; group 5 (n = 14; 4%): high SBP at time of neuroimaging (>140 and ≤120), previously higher and varying. Note that SBP measurements were not obtained in 2003–2004 and 2005–2006. Dashed lines indicate estimated values. Solid lines indicate interpolate measured values.
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Figure 1: Systolic blood pressure (SBP) measures of the 5 groups identified using the group-based trajectory models of repeated SBP measures from study entry in 1997–1998 to time of neuroimaging in 2006–2008. Groups identified using group-based trajectory modeling: group 1 (n = 56; 19%): normal SBP at time of neuroimaging (<120mm Hg), previously stable; group 2 (n = 158; 50%): moderate SBP at time of neuroimaging (120–140 mm Hg), previously stable; group 3 (n = 68; 22%): moderate SBP at time of neuroimaging, previously higher and varying; group 4 (n = 15; 5%): high SBP (>140 and <120), previously stable; group 5 (n = 14; 4%): high SBP at time of neuroimaging (>140 and ≤120), previously higher and varying. Note that SBP measurements were not obtained in 2003–2004 and 2005–2006. Dashed lines indicate estimated values. Solid lines indicate interpolate measured values.

Mentions: Group-based trajectory models25,26 using PROC TRAJ in SAS9 were applied to identify SBP trajectories. Groups were chosen using the Bayesian information criteria without a priori assumptions regarding the order of the trajectory curves as long as the estimated probabilities of group membership were significant and the time coefficients were of statistical significance. Five groups were identified (Figure 1): 3 had stable SBP levels, and 2 had higher and varying levels in the years preceding neuroimaging.


Longitudinal systolic blood pressure characteristics and integrity of white matter tracts in a cohort of very old black and white adults.

Rosano C, Abebe KZ, Aizenstein HJ, Boudreau R, Jennings JR, Venkatraman V, Harris TB, Yaffe K, Satterfield S, Newman AB, Health ABC Stu - Am. J. Hypertens. (2014)

Systolic blood pressure (SBP) measures of the 5 groups identified using the group-based trajectory models of repeated SBP measures from study entry in 1997–1998 to time of neuroimaging in 2006–2008. Groups identified using group-based trajectory modeling: group 1 (n = 56; 19%): normal SBP at time of neuroimaging (<120mm Hg), previously stable; group 2 (n = 158; 50%): moderate SBP at time of neuroimaging (120–140 mm Hg), previously stable; group 3 (n = 68; 22%): moderate SBP at time of neuroimaging, previously higher and varying; group 4 (n = 15; 5%): high SBP (>140 and <120), previously stable; group 5 (n = 14; 4%): high SBP at time of neuroimaging (>140 and ≤120), previously higher and varying. Note that SBP measurements were not obtained in 2003–2004 and 2005–2006. Dashed lines indicate estimated values. Solid lines indicate interpolate measured values.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325666&req=5

Figure 1: Systolic blood pressure (SBP) measures of the 5 groups identified using the group-based trajectory models of repeated SBP measures from study entry in 1997–1998 to time of neuroimaging in 2006–2008. Groups identified using group-based trajectory modeling: group 1 (n = 56; 19%): normal SBP at time of neuroimaging (<120mm Hg), previously stable; group 2 (n = 158; 50%): moderate SBP at time of neuroimaging (120–140 mm Hg), previously stable; group 3 (n = 68; 22%): moderate SBP at time of neuroimaging, previously higher and varying; group 4 (n = 15; 5%): high SBP (>140 and <120), previously stable; group 5 (n = 14; 4%): high SBP at time of neuroimaging (>140 and ≤120), previously higher and varying. Note that SBP measurements were not obtained in 2003–2004 and 2005–2006. Dashed lines indicate estimated values. Solid lines indicate interpolate measured values.
Mentions: Group-based trajectory models25,26 using PROC TRAJ in SAS9 were applied to identify SBP trajectories. Groups were chosen using the Bayesian information criteria without a priori assumptions regarding the order of the trajectory curves as long as the estimated probabilities of group membership were significant and the time coefficients were of statistical significance. Five groups were identified (Figure 1): 3 had stable SBP levels, and 2 had higher and varying levels in the years preceding neuroimaging.

Bottom Line: Higher mean SBP was associated with lower white matter integrity in uncinate and superior lateral fasciculi bilaterally, independent of age, stroke history, antihypertensive medication use (odds ratio of having white matter hyperintensities greater than or equal to the median for 10mm Hg of SBP = 10.4, 95% confidence interval = 10.2-10.6, P = 0.0001; standardized beta for fractional anisotropy = -13.54, SE = 4.58, P = 0.003).Associations with gray matter measures were not significant.Whether lowering and/or stabilizing SBP levels in very old adults without a remarkable cardiovascular history would have neuroprotective effects and reduce dementia risk needs further study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; rosanoc@edc.pitt.edu.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus