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Bat-borne rabies in Latin America.

Escobar LE, Peterson AT, Favi M, Yung V, Medina-Vogel G - Rev. Inst. Med. Trop. Sao Paulo (2015 Jan-Feb)

Bottom Line: Here, bat species known to be rabies-positive with different antigenic variants, are summarized in relation to bat conservation status across Latin America.Research at coarse spatial scales must strive to understand rabies ecology; basic information on distribution and population dynamics of many Latin American and Caribbean bat species is needed; and detailed information on effects of landscape change in driving bat-borne rabies outbreaks remains unassessed.Finally, integrated approaches including public health, ecology, and conservation biology are needed to understand and prevent emergent diseases in bats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Facultad de Ecología y Recursos Naturales, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago Centro, Chile.

ABSTRACT
The situation of rabies in America is complex: rabies in dogs has decreased dramatically, but bats are increasingly recognized as natural reservoirs of other rabies variants. Here, bat species known to be rabies-positive with different antigenic variants, are summarized in relation to bat conservation status across Latin America. Rabies virus is widespread in Latin American bat species, 22.5%75 of bat species have been confirmed as rabies-positive. Most bat species found rabies positive are classified by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as "Least Concern". According to diet type, insectivorous bats had the most species known as rabies reservoirs, while in proportion hematophagous bats were the most important. Research at coarse spatial scales must strive to understand rabies ecology; basic information on distribution and population dynamics of many Latin American and Caribbean bat species is needed; and detailed information on effects of landscape change in driving bat-borne rabies outbreaks remains unassessed. Finally, integrated approaches including public health, ecology, and conservation biology are needed to understand and prevent emergent diseases in bats.

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Dog (blue line) and bat (red line) rabies cases during 2003-2013, based onsamples from Latin American and Caribbean countries considered in this study.Belize, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Guyana, French Guyana, and Haiti didnot have reports for this period. Notice the linear trend (black line) for eachhost group. Proportion of positive bat (green dash line) and dog samples(purple dash line) is shown. Source: SIEPI-PANAFTOSA/PAHO-WHO, data availableon http://siepi.panaftosa.org.br/
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f01: Dog (blue line) and bat (red line) rabies cases during 2003-2013, based onsamples from Latin American and Caribbean countries considered in this study.Belize, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Guyana, French Guyana, and Haiti didnot have reports for this period. Notice the linear trend (black line) for eachhost group. Proportion of positive bat (green dash line) and dog samples(purple dash line) is shown. Source: SIEPI-PANAFTOSA/PAHO-WHO, data availableon http://siepi.panaftosa.org.br/

Mentions: In fact, by 2013, human and canine rabies rates in Latin America haddecreased by 95% compared to previous years (Fig.1). Epidemiological surveillance is considered to have been essential forcontrol of rabies in Latin America79. However, while reports of rabid dogs in Latin America have declined, the numberof bat rabies cases appears stable (Fig. 1).Although further data compilation is needed for a clearer picture of this phenomenon, inLatin America, data on rabies are woefully limited and biased by uneven surveillanceeffort.


Bat-borne rabies in Latin America.

Escobar LE, Peterson AT, Favi M, Yung V, Medina-Vogel G - Rev. Inst. Med. Trop. Sao Paulo (2015 Jan-Feb)

Dog (blue line) and bat (red line) rabies cases during 2003-2013, based onsamples from Latin American and Caribbean countries considered in this study.Belize, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Guyana, French Guyana, and Haiti didnot have reports for this period. Notice the linear trend (black line) for eachhost group. Proportion of positive bat (green dash line) and dog samples(purple dash line) is shown. Source: SIEPI-PANAFTOSA/PAHO-WHO, data availableon http://siepi.panaftosa.org.br/
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325525&req=5

f01: Dog (blue line) and bat (red line) rabies cases during 2003-2013, based onsamples from Latin American and Caribbean countries considered in this study.Belize, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Guyana, French Guyana, and Haiti didnot have reports for this period. Notice the linear trend (black line) for eachhost group. Proportion of positive bat (green dash line) and dog samples(purple dash line) is shown. Source: SIEPI-PANAFTOSA/PAHO-WHO, data availableon http://siepi.panaftosa.org.br/
Mentions: In fact, by 2013, human and canine rabies rates in Latin America haddecreased by 95% compared to previous years (Fig.1). Epidemiological surveillance is considered to have been essential forcontrol of rabies in Latin America79. However, while reports of rabid dogs in Latin America have declined, the numberof bat rabies cases appears stable (Fig. 1).Although further data compilation is needed for a clearer picture of this phenomenon, inLatin America, data on rabies are woefully limited and biased by uneven surveillanceeffort.

Bottom Line: Here, bat species known to be rabies-positive with different antigenic variants, are summarized in relation to bat conservation status across Latin America.Research at coarse spatial scales must strive to understand rabies ecology; basic information on distribution and population dynamics of many Latin American and Caribbean bat species is needed; and detailed information on effects of landscape change in driving bat-borne rabies outbreaks remains unassessed.Finally, integrated approaches including public health, ecology, and conservation biology are needed to understand and prevent emergent diseases in bats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Facultad de Ecología y Recursos Naturales, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago Centro, Chile.

ABSTRACT
The situation of rabies in America is complex: rabies in dogs has decreased dramatically, but bats are increasingly recognized as natural reservoirs of other rabies variants. Here, bat species known to be rabies-positive with different antigenic variants, are summarized in relation to bat conservation status across Latin America. Rabies virus is widespread in Latin American bat species, 22.5%75 of bat species have been confirmed as rabies-positive. Most bat species found rabies positive are classified by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as "Least Concern". According to diet type, insectivorous bats had the most species known as rabies reservoirs, while in proportion hematophagous bats were the most important. Research at coarse spatial scales must strive to understand rabies ecology; basic information on distribution and population dynamics of many Latin American and Caribbean bat species is needed; and detailed information on effects of landscape change in driving bat-borne rabies outbreaks remains unassessed. Finally, integrated approaches including public health, ecology, and conservation biology are needed to understand and prevent emergent diseases in bats.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus