Limits...
Survival, induction and resuscitation of Vibrio cholerae from the viable but non-culturable state in the Southern Caribbean Sea.

Fernández-Delgado M, García-Amado MA, Contreras M, Incani RN, Chirinos H, Rojas H, Suárez P - Rev. Inst. Med. Trop. Sao Paulo (2015 Jan-Feb)

Bottom Line: At 119 days of exposure to the environment, the colony count was < 10 CFU/mL and a portion of the bacterial population entered the VBNC state.Additionally, the viability decreased two orders of magnitude and morphological changes occurred from rod to coccoid cells.Among the aquatic environmental variables, the salinity had negative correlation with the colony counts in the dry season.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Biología de Organismos, Universidad Simón Bolívar, Caracas, Venezuela.

ABSTRACT
The causative agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae, can enter into a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state in response to unfavorable conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in situ survival of V. cholerae in an aquatic environment of the Southern Caribbean Sea, and its induction and resuscitation from the VBNC state. V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 was inoculated into diffusion chambers placed at the Cuare Wildlife Refuge, Venezuela, and monitored for plate, total and viable cells counts. At 119 days of exposure to the environment, the colony count was < 10 CFU/mL and a portion of the bacterial population entered the VBNC state. Additionally, the viability decreased two orders of magnitude and morphological changes occurred from rod to coccoid cells. Among the aquatic environmental variables, the salinity had negative correlation with the colony counts in the dry season. Resuscitation studies showed significant recovery of cell cultivability with spent media addition (p < 0.05). These results suggest that V. cholerae can persist in the VBNC state in this Caribbean environment and revert to a cultivable form under favorable conditions. The VBNC state might represent a critical step in cholera transmission in susceptible areas.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Culturability of Vibrio cholerae cells associated withseawater salinity during sampling time. The broken line distinguishes the twoseasons: rainy (from 0 to 21 days) and dry (from 21 to 119 days). Data are mean± SE values of triplicate samples. Colony counts () and salinity ().
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325519&req=5

f02: Culturability of Vibrio cholerae cells associated withseawater salinity during sampling time. The broken line distinguishes the twoseasons: rainy (from 0 to 21 days) and dry (from 21 to 119 days). Data are mean± SE values of triplicate samples. Colony counts () and salinity ().

Mentions: The environmental parameters: temperature, pH, salinity and dissolved oxygenof seawater registered during the present survival study ranged from 27.2-31.8 °C, pH6.5-7, 2-32‰ and 4-7.9 mg/L, respectively. The most important variation of theseseasonal conditions was the salinity of seawater, which was found with two distinctpatterns during the rainy (from 0 to 21 days) and dry periods (from 21 to 119 days)considered in this study. When salinity was between two and 18‰, the culturability ofV. cholerae was higher than 1 x 104 CFU/mL, whereassalinities higher than 18‰ produced cultivability of up to three orders of magnitudefewer (Fig. 2).


Survival, induction and resuscitation of Vibrio cholerae from the viable but non-culturable state in the Southern Caribbean Sea.

Fernández-Delgado M, García-Amado MA, Contreras M, Incani RN, Chirinos H, Rojas H, Suárez P - Rev. Inst. Med. Trop. Sao Paulo (2015 Jan-Feb)

Culturability of Vibrio cholerae cells associated withseawater salinity during sampling time. The broken line distinguishes the twoseasons: rainy (from 0 to 21 days) and dry (from 21 to 119 days). Data are mean± SE values of triplicate samples. Colony counts () and salinity ().
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325519&req=5

f02: Culturability of Vibrio cholerae cells associated withseawater salinity during sampling time. The broken line distinguishes the twoseasons: rainy (from 0 to 21 days) and dry (from 21 to 119 days). Data are mean± SE values of triplicate samples. Colony counts () and salinity ().
Mentions: The environmental parameters: temperature, pH, salinity and dissolved oxygenof seawater registered during the present survival study ranged from 27.2-31.8 °C, pH6.5-7, 2-32‰ and 4-7.9 mg/L, respectively. The most important variation of theseseasonal conditions was the salinity of seawater, which was found with two distinctpatterns during the rainy (from 0 to 21 days) and dry periods (from 21 to 119 days)considered in this study. When salinity was between two and 18‰, the culturability ofV. cholerae was higher than 1 x 104 CFU/mL, whereassalinities higher than 18‰ produced cultivability of up to three orders of magnitudefewer (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: At 119 days of exposure to the environment, the colony count was < 10 CFU/mL and a portion of the bacterial population entered the VBNC state.Additionally, the viability decreased two orders of magnitude and morphological changes occurred from rod to coccoid cells.Among the aquatic environmental variables, the salinity had negative correlation with the colony counts in the dry season.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Biología de Organismos, Universidad Simón Bolívar, Caracas, Venezuela.

ABSTRACT
The causative agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae, can enter into a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state in response to unfavorable conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in situ survival of V. cholerae in an aquatic environment of the Southern Caribbean Sea, and its induction and resuscitation from the VBNC state. V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 was inoculated into diffusion chambers placed at the Cuare Wildlife Refuge, Venezuela, and monitored for plate, total and viable cells counts. At 119 days of exposure to the environment, the colony count was < 10 CFU/mL and a portion of the bacterial population entered the VBNC state. Additionally, the viability decreased two orders of magnitude and morphological changes occurred from rod to coccoid cells. Among the aquatic environmental variables, the salinity had negative correlation with the colony counts in the dry season. Resuscitation studies showed significant recovery of cell cultivability with spent media addition (p < 0.05). These results suggest that V. cholerae can persist in the VBNC state in this Caribbean environment and revert to a cultivable form under favorable conditions. The VBNC state might represent a critical step in cholera transmission in susceptible areas.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus