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Percutaneous interspinous distraction device for the treatment of lumbar spinal canal stenosis: clinical and radiographic results at 2-year follow-up.

Yingsakmongkol W, Chaichankul C, Limthongkul W - Int J Spine Surg (2014)

Bottom Line: The mean VAS score of back pain decreased significantly (p < 0.05).The device offers significant decrease in back pain, leg pain and ODI score with 2-year lasting relief from symptoms.A very weak correlation between the radiographic changes and improvement of pain was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the In- space (Synthes, Umkirch, Germany) and the correlation between radiographic parameters and clinical outcome in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS).

Methods: Between June 2009 and May 2013, 56 patients with LSS underwent In-space by one senior surgeon. All of the patients were evaluated both clinically and radiographic measurements before the procedure and each visit at the postoperative follow-up. Preoperative and postoperative X-ray imaging was performed before the procedure and at follow-up to assess the correlation with the clinical outcome. Radiological measurements and clinical outcomes were recorded to establish a relationship between the radiographic parameters and clinical outcome of this procedure. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up.

Results: The mean VAS score of back pain decreased significantly (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: Our data suggest that percutaneous interspinous devices are a good alternative to treat LSS. The device offers significant decrease in back pain, leg pain and ODI score with 2-year lasting relief from symptoms. The increased intervertebral foramenal space explains the improvement of leg pain, but the mechanism of back pain relief remains unclear. A very weak correlation between the radiographic changes and improvement of pain was found.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean VAS score of back pain and the mean VAS score of leg pain before and after the procedure.
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Figure 0003: Mean VAS score of back pain and the mean VAS score of leg pain before and after the procedure.

Mentions: The mean VAS score of back pain decreased significantly (p < 0.0001) from 6.56 preoperative to 2.64 at 1 week after the procedure however, no statistically significant difference in back pain was found after 1 week to 2-year follow-up. (Figure 3) The mean VAS score of leg pain decreased significantly (p < 0.0001) from 7.47 preoperative to 2.28 at 1 week after the procedure. The leg pain score remain unchanged until 2-year follow-up. The ODI score was found decreased after the procedure in most patients. (Figure 4) A reduction of clinical symptoms was observed.


Percutaneous interspinous distraction device for the treatment of lumbar spinal canal stenosis: clinical and radiographic results at 2-year follow-up.

Yingsakmongkol W, Chaichankul C, Limthongkul W - Int J Spine Surg (2014)

Mean VAS score of back pain and the mean VAS score of leg pain before and after the procedure.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325485&req=5

Figure 0003: Mean VAS score of back pain and the mean VAS score of leg pain before and after the procedure.
Mentions: The mean VAS score of back pain decreased significantly (p < 0.0001) from 6.56 preoperative to 2.64 at 1 week after the procedure however, no statistically significant difference in back pain was found after 1 week to 2-year follow-up. (Figure 3) The mean VAS score of leg pain decreased significantly (p < 0.0001) from 7.47 preoperative to 2.28 at 1 week after the procedure. The leg pain score remain unchanged until 2-year follow-up. The ODI score was found decreased after the procedure in most patients. (Figure 4) A reduction of clinical symptoms was observed.

Bottom Line: The mean VAS score of back pain decreased significantly (p < 0.05).The device offers significant decrease in back pain, leg pain and ODI score with 2-year lasting relief from symptoms.A very weak correlation between the radiographic changes and improvement of pain was found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the In- space (Synthes, Umkirch, Germany) and the correlation between radiographic parameters and clinical outcome in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS).

Methods: Between June 2009 and May 2013, 56 patients with LSS underwent In-space by one senior surgeon. All of the patients were evaluated both clinically and radiographic measurements before the procedure and each visit at the postoperative follow-up. Preoperative and postoperative X-ray imaging was performed before the procedure and at follow-up to assess the correlation with the clinical outcome. Radiological measurements and clinical outcomes were recorded to establish a relationship between the radiographic parameters and clinical outcome of this procedure. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up.

Results: The mean VAS score of back pain decreased significantly (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: Our data suggest that percutaneous interspinous devices are a good alternative to treat LSS. The device offers significant decrease in back pain, leg pain and ODI score with 2-year lasting relief from symptoms. The increased intervertebral foramenal space explains the improvement of leg pain, but the mechanism of back pain relief remains unclear. A very weak correlation between the radiographic changes and improvement of pain was found.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus