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A Meta-Analysis of Risky Sexual Behaviour among Male Youth in Developing Countries.

Berhan Y, Berhan A - AIDS Res Treat (2015)

Bottom Line: Previous tests of the association of risky sexual behaviour with levels of education and economic status have yielded inconsistent results.We applied a random effects analytic model and calculated a pooled odds ratio.The pooled odds ratio showed a statistically significant association of higher-risk sex with male youth younger than 20 years, living in urban centers, well educated, and of a high economic status.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hawassa University, P.O. Box 1560, Hawassa, Ethiopia.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this meta-analysis was to assess the association between risky sexual behaviour and level of education and economic status in male youth. Previous tests of the association of risky sexual behaviour with levels of education and economic status have yielded inconsistent results. Using data from 26 countries, from both within and outside Africa, we performed a meta-analysis with a specific focus on male youths' risky sexual behaviour. We applied a random effects analytic model and calculated a pooled odds ratio. Out of 19,148 males aged 15-24 years who reported having sexual intercourse in the 12 months preceding the survey, 75% engaged in higher-risk sex. The proportion of higher-risk sex among male youth aged 15-19 years was nearly 90% in 21 of the 26 countries. The pooled odds ratio showed a statistically significant association of higher-risk sex with male youth younger than 20 years, living in urban centers, well educated, and of a high economic status. The overall proportion of condom use during youths' most recent higher-risk sexual encounter was 40% and 51% among 15-19-year-olds and 20-24-year-olds, respectively. Our findings suggest that male youth's socioeconomic status is directly related to the likelihood that they practice higher-risk sex. The relationship between income and sexual behaviour should be explored further.

No MeSH data available.


Higher-risk sex practice in prior 12 months by wealth index (2003–2009). M-H = Mantel-Haenszel statistic; CI = confidence interval. Note: we divided the wealth index into two categories, namely, lowest or low (i.e., the first or second quintile) and middle to highest (i.e., the third through fifth quintiles), to make it fit for the meta-analysis software.
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fig3: Higher-risk sex practice in prior 12 months by wealth index (2003–2009). M-H = Mantel-Haenszel statistic; CI = confidence interval. Note: we divided the wealth index into two categories, namely, lowest or low (i.e., the first or second quintile) and middle to highest (i.e., the third through fifth quintiles), to make it fit for the meta-analysis software.

Mentions: Figure 3 reveals that youth who practiced higher-risk sex practice were likely to be characterized by the middle to highest wealth index in the majority of the countries studied. The total odds ratio suggests that, across countries, male youth in the middle to highest wealth index were 2.2 times more likely than low-wealth youth to report higher-risk sex (95% CI: 1.88–2.62). Although proportionally there were more higher-risk sexual practices among male youth with a higher wealth index, the odds ratios did not demonstrate a statistically significant association in Guinea, Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda. In Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Niger, Nigeria, and Vietnam, the odds ratio was higher than in other countries.


A Meta-Analysis of Risky Sexual Behaviour among Male Youth in Developing Countries.

Berhan Y, Berhan A - AIDS Res Treat (2015)

Higher-risk sex practice in prior 12 months by wealth index (2003–2009). M-H = Mantel-Haenszel statistic; CI = confidence interval. Note: we divided the wealth index into two categories, namely, lowest or low (i.e., the first or second quintile) and middle to highest (i.e., the third through fifth quintiles), to make it fit for the meta-analysis software.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325476&req=5

fig3: Higher-risk sex practice in prior 12 months by wealth index (2003–2009). M-H = Mantel-Haenszel statistic; CI = confidence interval. Note: we divided the wealth index into two categories, namely, lowest or low (i.e., the first or second quintile) and middle to highest (i.e., the third through fifth quintiles), to make it fit for the meta-analysis software.
Mentions: Figure 3 reveals that youth who practiced higher-risk sex practice were likely to be characterized by the middle to highest wealth index in the majority of the countries studied. The total odds ratio suggests that, across countries, male youth in the middle to highest wealth index were 2.2 times more likely than low-wealth youth to report higher-risk sex (95% CI: 1.88–2.62). Although proportionally there were more higher-risk sexual practices among male youth with a higher wealth index, the odds ratios did not demonstrate a statistically significant association in Guinea, Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda. In Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Niger, Nigeria, and Vietnam, the odds ratio was higher than in other countries.

Bottom Line: Previous tests of the association of risky sexual behaviour with levels of education and economic status have yielded inconsistent results.We applied a random effects analytic model and calculated a pooled odds ratio.The pooled odds ratio showed a statistically significant association of higher-risk sex with male youth younger than 20 years, living in urban centers, well educated, and of a high economic status.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hawassa University, P.O. Box 1560, Hawassa, Ethiopia.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this meta-analysis was to assess the association between risky sexual behaviour and level of education and economic status in male youth. Previous tests of the association of risky sexual behaviour with levels of education and economic status have yielded inconsistent results. Using data from 26 countries, from both within and outside Africa, we performed a meta-analysis with a specific focus on male youths' risky sexual behaviour. We applied a random effects analytic model and calculated a pooled odds ratio. Out of 19,148 males aged 15-24 years who reported having sexual intercourse in the 12 months preceding the survey, 75% engaged in higher-risk sex. The proportion of higher-risk sex among male youth aged 15-19 years was nearly 90% in 21 of the 26 countries. The pooled odds ratio showed a statistically significant association of higher-risk sex with male youth younger than 20 years, living in urban centers, well educated, and of a high economic status. The overall proportion of condom use during youths' most recent higher-risk sexual encounter was 40% and 51% among 15-19-year-olds and 20-24-year-olds, respectively. Our findings suggest that male youth's socioeconomic status is directly related to the likelihood that they practice higher-risk sex. The relationship between income and sexual behaviour should be explored further.

No MeSH data available.