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Measurement properties and implementation of a checklist to assess leadership skills during interdisciplinary rounds in the intensive care unit.

Ten Have EC, Nap RE, Tulleken JE - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Bottom Line: Factor analysis showed all factor loadings on 1 domain (>0.65).Implementation of the checklist showed a wide range of "no" and "yes" scores among the senior physicians.These results may underline the need for such a checklist to ensure tasks are synchronized within the team.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Directorate of Medical Affairs, Quality and Safety, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 30,001, 9700 LB Groningen, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
The implementation of interdisciplinary teams in the intensive care unit (ICU) has focused attention on leadership behavior. A daily recurrent situation in ICUs in which both leadership behavior and interdisciplinary teamwork are integrated concerns the interdisciplinary rounds (IDRs). Although IDRs are recommended to provide optimal interdisciplinary and patient-centered care, there are no checklists available for leading physicians. We tested the measurement properties and implementation of a checklist to assess the quality of leadership skills in interdisciplinary rounds. The measurement properties of the checklist, which included 10 essential quality indicators, were tested for interrater reliability and internal consistency and by factor analysis. The interrater reliability among 3 raters was good (κ, 0.85) and the internal consistency was acceptable (α, 0.74). Factor analysis showed all factor loadings on 1 domain (>0.65). The checklist was further implemented during videotaped IDRs which were led by senior physicians and in which 99 patients were discussed. Implementation of the checklist showed a wide range of "no" and "yes" scores among the senior physicians. These results may underline the need for such a checklist to ensure tasks are synchronized within the team.

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Results of the differences between the hypothesized and saturated model (with 95% confidence interval), with 99 patient presentations during 10 interdisciplinary rounds by 10 leading intensivists.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Results of the differences between the hypothesized and saturated model (with 95% confidence interval), with 99 patient presentations during 10 interdisciplinary rounds by 10 leading intensivists.

Mentions: The differences between the hypothesized standard of 90% “yes” or “not applicable” cores and saturated results showed that 9 of 10 essential quality indicators were markedly rated lower than the hypothesized standard. Only 1 essential quality indicator (expectations made clear by consultants) was similar to the hypothesized standard of the 90% “yes” or “not applicable” scores (Figure 1).


Measurement properties and implementation of a checklist to assess leadership skills during interdisciplinary rounds in the intensive care unit.

Ten Have EC, Nap RE, Tulleken JE - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Results of the differences between the hypothesized and saturated model (with 95% confidence interval), with 99 patient presentations during 10 interdisciplinary rounds by 10 leading intensivists.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325467&req=5

fig1: Results of the differences between the hypothesized and saturated model (with 95% confidence interval), with 99 patient presentations during 10 interdisciplinary rounds by 10 leading intensivists.
Mentions: The differences between the hypothesized standard of 90% “yes” or “not applicable” cores and saturated results showed that 9 of 10 essential quality indicators were markedly rated lower than the hypothesized standard. Only 1 essential quality indicator (expectations made clear by consultants) was similar to the hypothesized standard of the 90% “yes” or “not applicable” scores (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Factor analysis showed all factor loadings on 1 domain (>0.65).Implementation of the checklist showed a wide range of "no" and "yes" scores among the senior physicians.These results may underline the need for such a checklist to ensure tasks are synchronized within the team.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Directorate of Medical Affairs, Quality and Safety, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 30,001, 9700 LB Groningen, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
The implementation of interdisciplinary teams in the intensive care unit (ICU) has focused attention on leadership behavior. A daily recurrent situation in ICUs in which both leadership behavior and interdisciplinary teamwork are integrated concerns the interdisciplinary rounds (IDRs). Although IDRs are recommended to provide optimal interdisciplinary and patient-centered care, there are no checklists available for leading physicians. We tested the measurement properties and implementation of a checklist to assess the quality of leadership skills in interdisciplinary rounds. The measurement properties of the checklist, which included 10 essential quality indicators, were tested for interrater reliability and internal consistency and by factor analysis. The interrater reliability among 3 raters was good (κ, 0.85) and the internal consistency was acceptable (α, 0.74). Factor analysis showed all factor loadings on 1 domain (>0.65). The checklist was further implemented during videotaped IDRs which were led by senior physicians and in which 99 patients were discussed. Implementation of the checklist showed a wide range of "no" and "yes" scores among the senior physicians. These results may underline the need for such a checklist to ensure tasks are synchronized within the team.

Show MeSH