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A new tear pattern of the rotator cuff and its treatment: Fosbury flop tears.

L├Ądermann A, Denard PJ, Kolo FC - Int J Shoulder Surg (2015 Jan-Mar)

Bottom Line: A prospective radiologic and clinical study collected all patients with a magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram that underwent an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair over a 1 year period.Characteristic radiographic findings included a thicker tendon than normal, the presence of a stump and accumulation of liquid in the superior-medial part of the subacromial bursa, and adhesions between the supraspinatus tendon and the wall of the subacromial bursa.Level IV.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, La Tour Hospital, Meyrin, Meyrin, Switzerland ; Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose of this report is to describe a new full-thickness tear pattern of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with reversal healing. We describe the specific radiologic signs associated with this tear pattern and the arthroscopic rotator cuff repair technique.

Materials and methods: A prospective radiologic and clinical study collected all patients with a magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram that underwent an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair over a 1 year period.

Results: Among 97 patients, five demonstrated a tear of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with reversal healing. Characteristic radiographic findings included a thicker tendon than normal, the presence of a stump and accumulation of liquid in the superior-medial part of the subacromial bursa, and adhesions between the supraspinatus tendon and the wall of the subacromial bursa.

Conclusion: Avulsion of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with reversal healing on its bursal-side is a less common condition. This type of lesion and distinct radiographic signs that can be recognized to facilitate anatomic repair of the rotator cuff.

Level of evidence: Level IV.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Arthroscopic view of a right shoulder through lateral portal after bursectomy and creation of a bone socket for medial row anchor placement. The supraspinatus tendon unusually thick and has the appearance of ulcerations and flanges of the bursal-side (H = Hole of the tap; HH = Humeral head; SS = Supraspinatus tendon)
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Figure 1: Arthroscopic view of a right shoulder through lateral portal after bursectomy and creation of a bone socket for medial row anchor placement. The supraspinatus tendon unusually thick and has the appearance of ulcerations and flanges of the bursal-side (H = Hole of the tap; HH = Humeral head; SS = Supraspinatus tendon)

Mentions: The musculotendinous units of the rotator cuff play a crucial role in nonpathological and pathologic conditions of the shoulder.[1] Tears of the supraspinatus may occur at the musculotendinous junction,[2] bone insertion,[3] or within the tendon itself.[4] Tearing of the tendon from the bone is most common and is typically described a partial bursal-sided tear, partial articular-sided tendon tear,[5] interstitial partial-thickness tear or a full-thickness tear [Figure 1].


A new tear pattern of the rotator cuff and its treatment: Fosbury flop tears.

L├Ądermann A, Denard PJ, Kolo FC - Int J Shoulder Surg (2015 Jan-Mar)

Arthroscopic view of a right shoulder through lateral portal after bursectomy and creation of a bone socket for medial row anchor placement. The supraspinatus tendon unusually thick and has the appearance of ulcerations and flanges of the bursal-side (H = Hole of the tap; HH = Humeral head; SS = Supraspinatus tendon)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325389&req=5

Figure 1: Arthroscopic view of a right shoulder through lateral portal after bursectomy and creation of a bone socket for medial row anchor placement. The supraspinatus tendon unusually thick and has the appearance of ulcerations and flanges of the bursal-side (H = Hole of the tap; HH = Humeral head; SS = Supraspinatus tendon)
Mentions: The musculotendinous units of the rotator cuff play a crucial role in nonpathological and pathologic conditions of the shoulder.[1] Tears of the supraspinatus may occur at the musculotendinous junction,[2] bone insertion,[3] or within the tendon itself.[4] Tearing of the tendon from the bone is most common and is typically described a partial bursal-sided tear, partial articular-sided tendon tear,[5] interstitial partial-thickness tear or a full-thickness tear [Figure 1].

Bottom Line: A prospective radiologic and clinical study collected all patients with a magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram that underwent an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair over a 1 year period.Characteristic radiographic findings included a thicker tendon than normal, the presence of a stump and accumulation of liquid in the superior-medial part of the subacromial bursa, and adhesions between the supraspinatus tendon and the wall of the subacromial bursa.Level IV.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, La Tour Hospital, Meyrin, Meyrin, Switzerland ; Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose of this report is to describe a new full-thickness tear pattern of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with reversal healing. We describe the specific radiologic signs associated with this tear pattern and the arthroscopic rotator cuff repair technique.

Materials and methods: A prospective radiologic and clinical study collected all patients with a magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram that underwent an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair over a 1 year period.

Results: Among 97 patients, five demonstrated a tear of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with reversal healing. Characteristic radiographic findings included a thicker tendon than normal, the presence of a stump and accumulation of liquid in the superior-medial part of the subacromial bursa, and adhesions between the supraspinatus tendon and the wall of the subacromial bursa.

Conclusion: Avulsion of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with reversal healing on its bursal-side is a less common condition. This type of lesion and distinct radiographic signs that can be recognized to facilitate anatomic repair of the rotator cuff.

Level of evidence: Level IV.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus