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The isolated inferior glenohumeral labrum injury, anterior to posterior (the ILAP): A case series.

Irion V, Cheah M, Jones GL, Bishop JY - Int J Shoulder Surg (2015 Jan-Mar)

Bottom Line: Eleven of 12 patients (91.7%) had good or excellent scores.Ten of 12 patients (83.3%) had a feeling of stability in the shoulder.All 12 patients reached were satisfied with the procedure and would undergo surgery again in a similar situation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, OSU Sports Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: We describe the presentation, exam findings, surgical repair techniques, and short-term outcomes in a series of patients with isolated inferior labral tears.

Materials and methods: A retrospective chart review was performed at a large academic medical center. Isolated inferior labral tears were defined as between the 4 o'clock and 8 o'clock position of the glenoid as determined by direct arthroscopic visualization. Tears that were smaller were also included but were required to cross the 6 o'clock point, having anterior and posterior components. Patients were excluded if they had any other pathology or treatment of the shoulder. 1-year follow-up was required.

Results: Of the 17 patients who met inclusion criteria for review, 12 were available for a minimum 1-year follow-up. Average total follow-up for patients to complete the phone interview/Oxford Shoulder Instability Score (OSIS) was an average of 37.7 months (range: 16-79 months). Postoperatively, all reported symptom improvement or resolution since surgery. The mean preoperative pain on a scale of 0-10 was 6.3 (range: 0-10). Mean postoperative pain on a scale of 0-10 was 2.25 (range: 0-5). Eleven of 12 patients (91.7%) had returned to the level of activity desired. The mean OSIS was 41.4 (median: 43; range: 27-47). Eleven of 12 patients (91.7%) had good or excellent scores. Ten of 12 patients (83.3%) had a feeling of stability in the shoulder. All 12 patients reached were satisfied with the procedure and would undergo surgery again in a similar situation.

Conclusions: We have presented our series of patients with isolated inferior labral injury, and have shown that when surgically treated, outcomes of this uncommon injury are good to excellent and a full return to sports can be expected.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Selective magnetic resonance imaging demonstrating an inferior labral tear and inferior paralabral cyst, which has been seen in inferior labral tear. An axial image (a) shows and inferior labral tear (red circle) with clear extension anteriorly and posteriorly (black circles). A coronal view (b) demonstrating inferior labral tear (circle). A sagittal view (c) demonstrating an inferior paralabral cyst (circle)
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Figure 7: Selective magnetic resonance imaging demonstrating an inferior labral tear and inferior paralabral cyst, which has been seen in inferior labral tear. An axial image (a) shows and inferior labral tear (red circle) with clear extension anteriorly and posteriorly (black circles). A coronal view (b) demonstrating inferior labral tear (circle). A sagittal view (c) demonstrating an inferior paralabral cyst (circle)

Mentions: Seventeen patients met the criteria established for isolated inferior labral tear in this retrospective study. Arthroscopic pictures as referenced above are seen in Figures 1–7. They illustrate the typical appearance in this injury.


The isolated inferior glenohumeral labrum injury, anterior to posterior (the ILAP): A case series.

Irion V, Cheah M, Jones GL, Bishop JY - Int J Shoulder Surg (2015 Jan-Mar)

Selective magnetic resonance imaging demonstrating an inferior labral tear and inferior paralabral cyst, which has been seen in inferior labral tear. An axial image (a) shows and inferior labral tear (red circle) with clear extension anteriorly and posteriorly (black circles). A coronal view (b) demonstrating inferior labral tear (circle). A sagittal view (c) demonstrating an inferior paralabral cyst (circle)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325385&req=5

Figure 7: Selective magnetic resonance imaging demonstrating an inferior labral tear and inferior paralabral cyst, which has been seen in inferior labral tear. An axial image (a) shows and inferior labral tear (red circle) with clear extension anteriorly and posteriorly (black circles). A coronal view (b) demonstrating inferior labral tear (circle). A sagittal view (c) demonstrating an inferior paralabral cyst (circle)
Mentions: Seventeen patients met the criteria established for isolated inferior labral tear in this retrospective study. Arthroscopic pictures as referenced above are seen in Figures 1–7. They illustrate the typical appearance in this injury.

Bottom Line: Eleven of 12 patients (91.7%) had good or excellent scores.Ten of 12 patients (83.3%) had a feeling of stability in the shoulder.All 12 patients reached were satisfied with the procedure and would undergo surgery again in a similar situation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, OSU Sports Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: We describe the presentation, exam findings, surgical repair techniques, and short-term outcomes in a series of patients with isolated inferior labral tears.

Materials and methods: A retrospective chart review was performed at a large academic medical center. Isolated inferior labral tears were defined as between the 4 o'clock and 8 o'clock position of the glenoid as determined by direct arthroscopic visualization. Tears that were smaller were also included but were required to cross the 6 o'clock point, having anterior and posterior components. Patients were excluded if they had any other pathology or treatment of the shoulder. 1-year follow-up was required.

Results: Of the 17 patients who met inclusion criteria for review, 12 were available for a minimum 1-year follow-up. Average total follow-up for patients to complete the phone interview/Oxford Shoulder Instability Score (OSIS) was an average of 37.7 months (range: 16-79 months). Postoperatively, all reported symptom improvement or resolution since surgery. The mean preoperative pain on a scale of 0-10 was 6.3 (range: 0-10). Mean postoperative pain on a scale of 0-10 was 2.25 (range: 0-5). Eleven of 12 patients (91.7%) had returned to the level of activity desired. The mean OSIS was 41.4 (median: 43; range: 27-47). Eleven of 12 patients (91.7%) had good or excellent scores. Ten of 12 patients (83.3%) had a feeling of stability in the shoulder. All 12 patients reached were satisfied with the procedure and would undergo surgery again in a similar situation.

Conclusions: We have presented our series of patients with isolated inferior labral injury, and have shown that when surgically treated, outcomes of this uncommon injury are good to excellent and a full return to sports can be expected.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus