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The isolated inferior glenohumeral labrum injury, anterior to posterior (the ILAP): A case series.

Irion V, Cheah M, Jones GL, Bishop JY - Int J Shoulder Surg (2015 Jan-Mar)

Bottom Line: Eleven of 12 patients (91.7%) had good or excellent scores.Ten of 12 patients (83.3%) had a feeling of stability in the shoulder.All 12 patients reached were satisfied with the procedure and would undergo surgery again in a similar situation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, OSU Sports Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: We describe the presentation, exam findings, surgical repair techniques, and short-term outcomes in a series of patients with isolated inferior labral tears.

Materials and methods: A retrospective chart review was performed at a large academic medical center. Isolated inferior labral tears were defined as between the 4 o'clock and 8 o'clock position of the glenoid as determined by direct arthroscopic visualization. Tears that were smaller were also included but were required to cross the 6 o'clock point, having anterior and posterior components. Patients were excluded if they had any other pathology or treatment of the shoulder. 1-year follow-up was required.

Results: Of the 17 patients who met inclusion criteria for review, 12 were available for a minimum 1-year follow-up. Average total follow-up for patients to complete the phone interview/Oxford Shoulder Instability Score (OSIS) was an average of 37.7 months (range: 16-79 months). Postoperatively, all reported symptom improvement or resolution since surgery. The mean preoperative pain on a scale of 0-10 was 6.3 (range: 0-10). Mean postoperative pain on a scale of 0-10 was 2.25 (range: 0-5). Eleven of 12 patients (91.7%) had returned to the level of activity desired. The mean OSIS was 41.4 (median: 43; range: 27-47). Eleven of 12 patients (91.7%) had good or excellent scores. Ten of 12 patients (83.3%) had a feeling of stability in the shoulder. All 12 patients reached were satisfied with the procedure and would undergo surgery again in a similar situation.

Conclusions: We have presented our series of patients with isolated inferior labral injury, and have shown that when surgically treated, outcomes of this uncommon injury are good to excellent and a full return to sports can be expected.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Telephone interview script
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App1: Telephone interview script

Mentions: After the final list of patients meeting the inclusion criteria was made, a chart review extracted the following data: Right versus left shoulder, chief complaint, age at surgery, occupation, mechanism of injury, level of pre- and post-operative pain, pre- and post-range of motion (ROM), number of pre- and post-operative subluxations/dislocations, result of pre- and post-operative apprehension test, result of inferior sulcus testing, number of anchors used, and pre- and post-operative participation in athletics. In addition, we attempted to contact all patients via telephone to conduct the Oxford Shoulder Instability Score (OSIS) questionnaire, along with a basic set of questions gauging overall satisfaction, results, stability, and return to activity postoperatively. The specific questions can be found in Appendix 1, along with the OSIS questionnaire. The telephone interview was conducted if patients were unable to come to our office for questioning and examination. The OSIS is a short, 12-item, condition-specific, patient-reported outcome measure developed and validated for measuring surgical and nonsurgical therapeutic outcomes of patients presenting with unidirectional or multidirectional instability of the shoulder sensitive to changes of clinical importance.[23] The survey, which is short, practical, reliable, and easy for patients to complete in person or over the phone, was first validated by Dawson et al. in 1999.[23] Patients receive a score based on their answers to the questions and receive a grade of poor, fair, good, or excellent based on what range their score falls. The score ranges are 0-19 poor, 20-29 fair, 30-39 good, and 40-48 excellent.


The isolated inferior glenohumeral labrum injury, anterior to posterior (the ILAP): A case series.

Irion V, Cheah M, Jones GL, Bishop JY - Int J Shoulder Surg (2015 Jan-Mar)

Telephone interview script
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4325385&req=5

App1: Telephone interview script
Mentions: After the final list of patients meeting the inclusion criteria was made, a chart review extracted the following data: Right versus left shoulder, chief complaint, age at surgery, occupation, mechanism of injury, level of pre- and post-operative pain, pre- and post-range of motion (ROM), number of pre- and post-operative subluxations/dislocations, result of pre- and post-operative apprehension test, result of inferior sulcus testing, number of anchors used, and pre- and post-operative participation in athletics. In addition, we attempted to contact all patients via telephone to conduct the Oxford Shoulder Instability Score (OSIS) questionnaire, along with a basic set of questions gauging overall satisfaction, results, stability, and return to activity postoperatively. The specific questions can be found in Appendix 1, along with the OSIS questionnaire. The telephone interview was conducted if patients were unable to come to our office for questioning and examination. The OSIS is a short, 12-item, condition-specific, patient-reported outcome measure developed and validated for measuring surgical and nonsurgical therapeutic outcomes of patients presenting with unidirectional or multidirectional instability of the shoulder sensitive to changes of clinical importance.[23] The survey, which is short, practical, reliable, and easy for patients to complete in person or over the phone, was first validated by Dawson et al. in 1999.[23] Patients receive a score based on their answers to the questions and receive a grade of poor, fair, good, or excellent based on what range their score falls. The score ranges are 0-19 poor, 20-29 fair, 30-39 good, and 40-48 excellent.

Bottom Line: Eleven of 12 patients (91.7%) had good or excellent scores.Ten of 12 patients (83.3%) had a feeling of stability in the shoulder.All 12 patients reached were satisfied with the procedure and would undergo surgery again in a similar situation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, OSU Sports Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: We describe the presentation, exam findings, surgical repair techniques, and short-term outcomes in a series of patients with isolated inferior labral tears.

Materials and methods: A retrospective chart review was performed at a large academic medical center. Isolated inferior labral tears were defined as between the 4 o'clock and 8 o'clock position of the glenoid as determined by direct arthroscopic visualization. Tears that were smaller were also included but were required to cross the 6 o'clock point, having anterior and posterior components. Patients were excluded if they had any other pathology or treatment of the shoulder. 1-year follow-up was required.

Results: Of the 17 patients who met inclusion criteria for review, 12 were available for a minimum 1-year follow-up. Average total follow-up for patients to complete the phone interview/Oxford Shoulder Instability Score (OSIS) was an average of 37.7 months (range: 16-79 months). Postoperatively, all reported symptom improvement or resolution since surgery. The mean preoperative pain on a scale of 0-10 was 6.3 (range: 0-10). Mean postoperative pain on a scale of 0-10 was 2.25 (range: 0-5). Eleven of 12 patients (91.7%) had returned to the level of activity desired. The mean OSIS was 41.4 (median: 43; range: 27-47). Eleven of 12 patients (91.7%) had good or excellent scores. Ten of 12 patients (83.3%) had a feeling of stability in the shoulder. All 12 patients reached were satisfied with the procedure and would undergo surgery again in a similar situation.

Conclusions: We have presented our series of patients with isolated inferior labral injury, and have shown that when surgically treated, outcomes of this uncommon injury are good to excellent and a full return to sports can be expected.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus