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Salmonella osteomyelitis of the hand in an infant with sickle cell disease.

Sinkin JC, Wood BC, Sauerhammer TM, Boyajian MJ, Rogers GF, Oh AK - Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Salmonella osteomyelitis involving the hand is a rare, but potentially morbid, complication of sickle cell disease in children.We report on a 15-month-old patient with sickle cell disease who ultimately developed osteomyelitis of 1 hand after an acute vasoocclusive episode caused 4 extremity dactylitis.The case description illustrates the diagnostic and treatment challenges.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, D.C.

ABSTRACT
Salmonella osteomyelitis involving the hand is a rare, but potentially morbid, complication of sickle cell disease in children. This entity can be difficult to distinguish from the more frequent presentation of dactylitis, but accurate diagnosis is critical to direct proper treatment. We report on a 15-month-old patient with sickle cell disease who ultimately developed osteomyelitis of 1 hand after an acute vasoocclusive episode caused 4 extremity dactylitis. The case description illustrates the diagnostic and treatment challenges.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Initial posterior-anterior radiograph of the hand following incision and drainage and placement of penrose drain, without reactive changes to the metacarpal and phalanges of the ring finger.
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Figure 2: Initial posterior-anterior radiograph of the hand following incision and drainage and placement of penrose drain, without reactive changes to the metacarpal and phalanges of the ring finger.

Mentions: Upon presentation to his hematologist, the patient was admitted to our hospital for inpatient observation. On exam, the patient was febrile to 39.6°C and irritable, with marked swelling of the proximal right ring finger, as well as diffuse dorsal and volar hand swelling and erythema. He had a frank abscess overlying the volar fourth metacarpal phalangeal joint (Fig. 1). Radiographs of the right hand demonstrated soft-tissue swelling but no osseous abnormalities (Fig. 2).


Salmonella osteomyelitis of the hand in an infant with sickle cell disease.

Sinkin JC, Wood BC, Sauerhammer TM, Boyajian MJ, Rogers GF, Oh AK - Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open (2015)

Initial posterior-anterior radiograph of the hand following incision and drainage and placement of penrose drain, without reactive changes to the metacarpal and phalanges of the ring finger.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4323402&req=5

Figure 2: Initial posterior-anterior radiograph of the hand following incision and drainage and placement of penrose drain, without reactive changes to the metacarpal and phalanges of the ring finger.
Mentions: Upon presentation to his hematologist, the patient was admitted to our hospital for inpatient observation. On exam, the patient was febrile to 39.6°C and irritable, with marked swelling of the proximal right ring finger, as well as diffuse dorsal and volar hand swelling and erythema. He had a frank abscess overlying the volar fourth metacarpal phalangeal joint (Fig. 1). Radiographs of the right hand demonstrated soft-tissue swelling but no osseous abnormalities (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Salmonella osteomyelitis involving the hand is a rare, but potentially morbid, complication of sickle cell disease in children.We report on a 15-month-old patient with sickle cell disease who ultimately developed osteomyelitis of 1 hand after an acute vasoocclusive episode caused 4 extremity dactylitis.The case description illustrates the diagnostic and treatment challenges.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, D.C.

ABSTRACT
Salmonella osteomyelitis involving the hand is a rare, but potentially morbid, complication of sickle cell disease in children. This entity can be difficult to distinguish from the more frequent presentation of dactylitis, but accurate diagnosis is critical to direct proper treatment. We report on a 15-month-old patient with sickle cell disease who ultimately developed osteomyelitis of 1 hand after an acute vasoocclusive episode caused 4 extremity dactylitis. The case description illustrates the diagnostic and treatment challenges.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus