Limits...
Reconstruction of the Second Metatarsal with Non-vascularised Fibular Graft following En-bloc Resection for Giant Cell Tumour: A Case Report.

Rengsen P, Tiong K, Teo Y, Goh T, Sivapathasundram N - Malays Orthop J (2013)

Bottom Line: Giant cell tumour in the metatarsal of a skeletally immature person is uncommon.Adequate surgical resection in this region can be difficult to achieve as there is little space between the rays of the foot.We describe a technique using non-vascularised fibular graft for reconstructing the 2nd metatarsal after en-bloc resection for giant cell tumour in a 14 year old adolescent female.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, Hospital Melaka, Malacca, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Giant cell tumour in the metatarsal of a skeletally immature person is uncommon. Adequate surgical resection in this region can be difficult to achieve as there is little space between the rays of the foot. Furthermore, there is the challenge of restoring the metatarsophalangeal articulation after resection of the tumor. We describe a technique using non-vascularised fibular graft for reconstructing the 2nd metatarsal after en-bloc resection for giant cell tumour in a 14 year old adolescent female.

Key words: Metatarsal, Giant cell tumour, Non-vascularised fibular graft, En-bloc resection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

: Radiograph taken at 24 months post surgery showingincorporation of graft with no evidence of subluxationor dislocation of the second metatarso-phalangeal joint- (3a : AP view); (3b : Lateral view).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4322136&req=5

Figure 3: : Radiograph taken at 24 months post surgery showingincorporation of graft with no evidence of subluxationor dislocation of the second metatarso-phalangeal joint- (3a : AP view); (3b : Lateral view).

Mentions: The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient wasdischarged on the 10th postoperative day. A cast was appliedfor 3 months to protect the graft and fixation. She was allowedpartial weight bearing after 3 months and full weight bearingafter 6 months. At the last review at 24 months the graft hadincorporated and united (Figure 3). The metatarsophalangealjoint was not subluxed. Clinically there was no evidence of local recurrence. She was now pain-free and there was notenderness over the graft or the 2nd metatarsophalangeal jointwith nearly full range of motion (metatarsophalangeal jointflexion and extension of 30 degrees). There was no evidenceof peroneal nerve injury and AOFAS scoring during the latestreview for midfoot was 97 points and MTP/IP was 92 points.


Reconstruction of the Second Metatarsal with Non-vascularised Fibular Graft following En-bloc Resection for Giant Cell Tumour: A Case Report.

Rengsen P, Tiong K, Teo Y, Goh T, Sivapathasundram N - Malays Orthop J (2013)

: Radiograph taken at 24 months post surgery showingincorporation of graft with no evidence of subluxationor dislocation of the second metatarso-phalangeal joint- (3a : AP view); (3b : Lateral view).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4322136&req=5

Figure 3: : Radiograph taken at 24 months post surgery showingincorporation of graft with no evidence of subluxationor dislocation of the second metatarso-phalangeal joint- (3a : AP view); (3b : Lateral view).
Mentions: The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient wasdischarged on the 10th postoperative day. A cast was appliedfor 3 months to protect the graft and fixation. She was allowedpartial weight bearing after 3 months and full weight bearingafter 6 months. At the last review at 24 months the graft hadincorporated and united (Figure 3). The metatarsophalangealjoint was not subluxed. Clinically there was no evidence of local recurrence. She was now pain-free and there was notenderness over the graft or the 2nd metatarsophalangeal jointwith nearly full range of motion (metatarsophalangeal jointflexion and extension of 30 degrees). There was no evidenceof peroneal nerve injury and AOFAS scoring during the latestreview for midfoot was 97 points and MTP/IP was 92 points.

Bottom Line: Giant cell tumour in the metatarsal of a skeletally immature person is uncommon.Adequate surgical resection in this region can be difficult to achieve as there is little space between the rays of the foot.We describe a technique using non-vascularised fibular graft for reconstructing the 2nd metatarsal after en-bloc resection for giant cell tumour in a 14 year old adolescent female.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, Hospital Melaka, Malacca, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Giant cell tumour in the metatarsal of a skeletally immature person is uncommon. Adequate surgical resection in this region can be difficult to achieve as there is little space between the rays of the foot. Furthermore, there is the challenge of restoring the metatarsophalangeal articulation after resection of the tumor. We describe a technique using non-vascularised fibular graft for reconstructing the 2nd metatarsal after en-bloc resection for giant cell tumour in a 14 year old adolescent female.

Key words: Metatarsal, Giant cell tumour, Non-vascularised fibular graft, En-bloc resection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus