Limits...
DHEA administration has limited effect onintestinal Ca absorption in ovariectomized rats.

Park J, Omi N - J Exerc Nutrition Biochem (2014)

Bottom Line: The BMC normalized by body weight of the lumbar spine (trabecular-abundant region) in the OD group was found to be significantly higher compared to that in the OC group.The femoral wet weight normalized by body weight in the OD group was significantly higher compared to that in the OC group.In both periods, all parameters did not differ between the groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Education, Konkuk University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The effect of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) administration on intestinal Calcium (Ca) absorption in estrogen deficiency state has not been studied yet. We examined the bone mineral content (BMC) of lumbar spine and Ca balance such as intestinal Ca absorption and Ca accumulation in ovariectomized (OVX) rats after 8 weeks of DHEA administration.

Methods: Seventeen female Sprague-Dawley rats, 6 weeks old, were randomized into two groups: OVX control rats (OC, n = 8) and OVX rats with DHEA treatment (OD, n = 9). DHEA was administered to the OD group intraperitoneally at 20 mg DHEA/kg body weight for 8 weeks while the OC group was treated with vehicle only.

Results: The BMC normalized by body weight of the lumbar spine (trabecular-abundant region) in the OD group was found to be significantly higher compared to that in the OC group. The femoral wet weight normalized by body weight in the OD group was significantly higher compared to that in the OC group. The intestinal Ca absorption, rate of intestinal Ca absorption, Ca accumulation, and rate of Ca accumulation decreased from the 4th and 5th of the experimental diet period to the end of the experimental period, but interaction of time and group was not observed. In both periods, all parameters did not differ between the groups.

Conclusion: The present study confirmed the positive effect of DHEA on trabecular bone mass in ovariectomized rats. On the other hand, DHEA administration might have limited the impact on intestinal Ca absorption in estrogen deficiency state.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The intestinal Ca absorption (A), rate of intestinal Ca absorption (B), Ca accumulation (C), and rate of Ca accumulation (d). The first phase was carried out on the 4th and 5th day after starting the experimental diets period (Metabolic cage phase 1: MC 1). The next phase (MC 2) was carried out at the end of the experimental period. At each phase, feces and urine were collected over two 24-h periods. OVX control rats (OC, n = 8) and OVX rats with DHEA treatment (OD, n = 9). ** p < 0.01 vs. OC. Values are expressed as the mean ± SE.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4322023&req=5

f2-jenb-18-4-333: The intestinal Ca absorption (A), rate of intestinal Ca absorption (B), Ca accumulation (C), and rate of Ca accumulation (d). The first phase was carried out on the 4th and 5th day after starting the experimental diets period (Metabolic cage phase 1: MC 1). The next phase (MC 2) was carried out at the end of the experimental period. At each phase, feces and urine were collected over two 24-h periods. OVX control rats (OC, n = 8) and OVX rats with DHEA treatment (OD, n = 9). ** p < 0.01 vs. OC. Values are expressed as the mean ± SE.

Mentions: The intestinal Ca absorption and accumulation are shown in Fig. 2. The intestinal Ca absorption, rate of intestinal Ca absorption, Ca accumulation, and rate of Ca accumulation decreased from MC 1 (the 4th and 5th of the experimental diet period) to MC 2 (the end of the experimental period), but the interaction of time and group was not observed. In both MC1 and MC2, all parameters did not differ between the groups. (Other than some article issues, this section is also solid.)


DHEA administration has limited effect onintestinal Ca absorption in ovariectomized rats.

Park J, Omi N - J Exerc Nutrition Biochem (2014)

The intestinal Ca absorption (A), rate of intestinal Ca absorption (B), Ca accumulation (C), and rate of Ca accumulation (d). The first phase was carried out on the 4th and 5th day after starting the experimental diets period (Metabolic cage phase 1: MC 1). The next phase (MC 2) was carried out at the end of the experimental period. At each phase, feces and urine were collected over two 24-h periods. OVX control rats (OC, n = 8) and OVX rats with DHEA treatment (OD, n = 9). ** p < 0.01 vs. OC. Values are expressed as the mean ± SE.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4322023&req=5

f2-jenb-18-4-333: The intestinal Ca absorption (A), rate of intestinal Ca absorption (B), Ca accumulation (C), and rate of Ca accumulation (d). The first phase was carried out on the 4th and 5th day after starting the experimental diets period (Metabolic cage phase 1: MC 1). The next phase (MC 2) was carried out at the end of the experimental period. At each phase, feces and urine were collected over two 24-h periods. OVX control rats (OC, n = 8) and OVX rats with DHEA treatment (OD, n = 9). ** p < 0.01 vs. OC. Values are expressed as the mean ± SE.
Mentions: The intestinal Ca absorption and accumulation are shown in Fig. 2. The intestinal Ca absorption, rate of intestinal Ca absorption, Ca accumulation, and rate of Ca accumulation decreased from MC 1 (the 4th and 5th of the experimental diet period) to MC 2 (the end of the experimental period), but the interaction of time and group was not observed. In both MC1 and MC2, all parameters did not differ between the groups. (Other than some article issues, this section is also solid.)

Bottom Line: The BMC normalized by body weight of the lumbar spine (trabecular-abundant region) in the OD group was found to be significantly higher compared to that in the OC group.The femoral wet weight normalized by body weight in the OD group was significantly higher compared to that in the OC group.In both periods, all parameters did not differ between the groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Education, Konkuk University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The effect of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) administration on intestinal Calcium (Ca) absorption in estrogen deficiency state has not been studied yet. We examined the bone mineral content (BMC) of lumbar spine and Ca balance such as intestinal Ca absorption and Ca accumulation in ovariectomized (OVX) rats after 8 weeks of DHEA administration.

Methods: Seventeen female Sprague-Dawley rats, 6 weeks old, were randomized into two groups: OVX control rats (OC, n = 8) and OVX rats with DHEA treatment (OD, n = 9). DHEA was administered to the OD group intraperitoneally at 20 mg DHEA/kg body weight for 8 weeks while the OC group was treated with vehicle only.

Results: The BMC normalized by body weight of the lumbar spine (trabecular-abundant region) in the OD group was found to be significantly higher compared to that in the OC group. The femoral wet weight normalized by body weight in the OD group was significantly higher compared to that in the OC group. The intestinal Ca absorption, rate of intestinal Ca absorption, Ca accumulation, and rate of Ca accumulation decreased from the 4th and 5th of the experimental diet period to the end of the experimental period, but interaction of time and group was not observed. In both periods, all parameters did not differ between the groups.

Conclusion: The present study confirmed the positive effect of DHEA on trabecular bone mass in ovariectomized rats. On the other hand, DHEA administration might have limited the impact on intestinal Ca absorption in estrogen deficiency state.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus