Limits...
Neural population tuning links visual cortical anatomy to human visual perception.

Song C, Schwarzkopf DS, Kanai R, Rees G - Neuron (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that visual cortical thickness correlated negatively with the sharpness of neural population tuning and the accuracy of perceptual discrimination at different visual field positions.In contrast, visual cortical surface area correlated positively with neural population tuning sharpness and perceptual discrimination accuracy.Our findings reveal a central role for neural population tuning in linking visual cortical anatomy to visual perception and suggest that a perceptually advantageous visual cortex is a thinned one with an enlarged surface area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK; Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK. Electronic address: chen.song.09@ucl.ac.uk.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Dependence of Neural Population Tuning Width and Perceptual Discrimination Threshold on V1 Anatomy at a Fixed Visual Field EccentricityAcross a total of 20 participants and six visual field positions at 4.7 degree eccentricity, the position tuning width of V1 neural populations (measured using fMRI) and the position discrimination threshold of human participants (measured using psychophysics) were plotted against each other (A) and against V1 surface area or V1 thickness (B and C). These analyses revealed a positive correlation between the position discrimination threshold of our participants and the position tuning width of V1 neural populations (A), as well as a dependence of both the position tuning width (B) and position discrimination threshold (C) on V1 anatomy. Specifically, the position tuning width of V1 neural populations (B), and the position discrimination threshold of our participants (C), correlated positively with V1 surface area, but negatively with V1 thickness. A further analysis, where interindividual variability and intraindividual variability were regressed out respectively, revealed that these correlations between neural population tuning width, perceptual acuity, and V1 anatomy existed both within and across individuals. Each data point represents the measures at a single visual field position from a single participant. Statistical values reflect permutation-based Spearman’s rank correlation with familywise error (FWE) correction for multiple comparisons.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321887&req=5

fig3: Dependence of Neural Population Tuning Width and Perceptual Discrimination Threshold on V1 Anatomy at a Fixed Visual Field EccentricityAcross a total of 20 participants and six visual field positions at 4.7 degree eccentricity, the position tuning width of V1 neural populations (measured using fMRI) and the position discrimination threshold of human participants (measured using psychophysics) were plotted against each other (A) and against V1 surface area or V1 thickness (B and C). These analyses revealed a positive correlation between the position discrimination threshold of our participants and the position tuning width of V1 neural populations (A), as well as a dependence of both the position tuning width (B) and position discrimination threshold (C) on V1 anatomy. Specifically, the position tuning width of V1 neural populations (B), and the position discrimination threshold of our participants (C), correlated positively with V1 surface area, but negatively with V1 thickness. A further analysis, where interindividual variability and intraindividual variability were regressed out respectively, revealed that these correlations between neural population tuning width, perceptual acuity, and V1 anatomy existed both within and across individuals. Each data point represents the measures at a single visual field position from a single participant. Statistical values reflect permutation-based Spearman’s rank correlation with familywise error (FWE) correction for multiple comparisons.

Mentions: As variability in the position tuning width and position discrimination threshold consisted of both eccentricity-independent and eccentricity-dependent components, we conducted separate analyses to explore the influences that visual cortical anatomy exerted on these two components, respectively. To control for the factor of eccentricity and study the eccentricity-independent component, we analyzed the relationships between visual cortical anatomy, neural population tuning width, and perceptual acuity at a fixed visual field eccentricity (4.7 degree). Across a total of 20 participants and six visual field positions at 4.7 degree eccentricity, we plotted the position tuning width of V1 neural populations and position discrimination threshold of human participants, first against each other to address the behavioral significance of neural population tuning (Figure 3A) and then against thickness or surface area of V1 to address the functional impacts of visual cortical anatomy (Figures 3B and 3C).


Neural population tuning links visual cortical anatomy to human visual perception.

Song C, Schwarzkopf DS, Kanai R, Rees G - Neuron (2015)

Dependence of Neural Population Tuning Width and Perceptual Discrimination Threshold on V1 Anatomy at a Fixed Visual Field EccentricityAcross a total of 20 participants and six visual field positions at 4.7 degree eccentricity, the position tuning width of V1 neural populations (measured using fMRI) and the position discrimination threshold of human participants (measured using psychophysics) were plotted against each other (A) and against V1 surface area or V1 thickness (B and C). These analyses revealed a positive correlation between the position discrimination threshold of our participants and the position tuning width of V1 neural populations (A), as well as a dependence of both the position tuning width (B) and position discrimination threshold (C) on V1 anatomy. Specifically, the position tuning width of V1 neural populations (B), and the position discrimination threshold of our participants (C), correlated positively with V1 surface area, but negatively with V1 thickness. A further analysis, where interindividual variability and intraindividual variability were regressed out respectively, revealed that these correlations between neural population tuning width, perceptual acuity, and V1 anatomy existed both within and across individuals. Each data point represents the measures at a single visual field position from a single participant. Statistical values reflect permutation-based Spearman’s rank correlation with familywise error (FWE) correction for multiple comparisons.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321887&req=5

fig3: Dependence of Neural Population Tuning Width and Perceptual Discrimination Threshold on V1 Anatomy at a Fixed Visual Field EccentricityAcross a total of 20 participants and six visual field positions at 4.7 degree eccentricity, the position tuning width of V1 neural populations (measured using fMRI) and the position discrimination threshold of human participants (measured using psychophysics) were plotted against each other (A) and against V1 surface area or V1 thickness (B and C). These analyses revealed a positive correlation between the position discrimination threshold of our participants and the position tuning width of V1 neural populations (A), as well as a dependence of both the position tuning width (B) and position discrimination threshold (C) on V1 anatomy. Specifically, the position tuning width of V1 neural populations (B), and the position discrimination threshold of our participants (C), correlated positively with V1 surface area, but negatively with V1 thickness. A further analysis, where interindividual variability and intraindividual variability were regressed out respectively, revealed that these correlations between neural population tuning width, perceptual acuity, and V1 anatomy existed both within and across individuals. Each data point represents the measures at a single visual field position from a single participant. Statistical values reflect permutation-based Spearman’s rank correlation with familywise error (FWE) correction for multiple comparisons.
Mentions: As variability in the position tuning width and position discrimination threshold consisted of both eccentricity-independent and eccentricity-dependent components, we conducted separate analyses to explore the influences that visual cortical anatomy exerted on these two components, respectively. To control for the factor of eccentricity and study the eccentricity-independent component, we analyzed the relationships between visual cortical anatomy, neural population tuning width, and perceptual acuity at a fixed visual field eccentricity (4.7 degree). Across a total of 20 participants and six visual field positions at 4.7 degree eccentricity, we plotted the position tuning width of V1 neural populations and position discrimination threshold of human participants, first against each other to address the behavioral significance of neural population tuning (Figure 3A) and then against thickness or surface area of V1 to address the functional impacts of visual cortical anatomy (Figures 3B and 3C).

Bottom Line: We found that visual cortical thickness correlated negatively with the sharpness of neural population tuning and the accuracy of perceptual discrimination at different visual field positions.In contrast, visual cortical surface area correlated positively with neural population tuning sharpness and perceptual discrimination accuracy.Our findings reveal a central role for neural population tuning in linking visual cortical anatomy to visual perception and suggest that a perceptually advantageous visual cortex is a thinned one with an enlarged surface area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK; Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK. Electronic address: chen.song.09@ucl.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus