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Supplementation with red palm oil increases β-carotene and vitamin A blood levels in patients with cystic fibrosis.

Sommerburg O, De Spirt S, Mattern A, Joachim C, Langhans CD, Nesaretnam K, Siems W, Stahl W, Mall MA - Mediators Inflamm. (2015)

Bottom Line: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of daily intake of red palm oil (RPO) containing high amounts of β-carotene on the antioxidant levels in CF patients.Plasma β-carotene, retinol, and α-carotene of these patients increased, but plasma concentrations of other carotenoids and α-tocopherol as well as concentrations of β-carotene, lycopene, α-tocopherol, and vitamin C in BMC remained unchanged.Since RPO on a daily basis did not show negative side effects the data suggest that RPO may be used to elevate plasma β-carotene in CF.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pediatric Pulmonology & Allergy and Cystic Fibrosis Centre, Department of Pediatrics III, Children's Hospital, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 430, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany ; Translational Lung Research Centre Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Centre for Lung Research (DZL), Im Neuenheimer Feld 350, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) show decreased plasma concentrations of antioxidants due to malabsorption of lipid soluble vitamins and consumption by chronic pulmonary inflammation. β-Carotene is a major source of retinol and therefore is of particular significance in CF. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of daily intake of red palm oil (RPO) containing high amounts of β-carotene on the antioxidant levels in CF patients. Sixteen subjects were recruited and instructed to enrich their food with 2 to 3 tablespoons of RPO (~1.5 mg of β-carotene) daily over 8 weeks. Carotenoids, retinol, and α-tocopherol were measured in plasma at baseline and after intervention. In addition β-carotene, lycopene, α-tocopherol, and vitamin C were measured in buccal mucosa cells (BMC) to determine the influence of RPO on antioxidant tissue levels. Eleven subjects completed the study properly. Plasma β-carotene, retinol, and α-carotene of these patients increased, but plasma concentrations of other carotenoids and α-tocopherol as well as concentrations of β-carotene, lycopene, α-tocopherol, and vitamin C in BMC remained unchanged. Since RPO on a daily basis did not show negative side effects the data suggest that RPO may be used to elevate plasma β-carotene in CF.

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Plasma concentrations of retinol and α-tocopherol at baseline and after RPO supplementation. Values are given in μmol/L. Concentration of retinol was significantly increased (day 56) when compared with baseline (day 0) (**P < 0.001). Concentration of α-tocopherol remained unchained compared with baseline.
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fig2: Plasma concentrations of retinol and α-tocopherol at baseline and after RPO supplementation. Values are given in μmol/L. Concentration of retinol was significantly increased (day 56) when compared with baseline (day 0) (**P < 0.001). Concentration of α-tocopherol remained unchained compared with baseline.

Mentions: Intervention with RPO also increased plasma retinol in all of the 11 CF patients. The changes were statistically significant (P < 0.001, Figure 2). Notably, this result was seen despite the parallel supplementation of vitamin A which was administered continuously to maintain vitamin A plasma values in the normal range. One explanation for that result might be that β-carotene from RPO may have a much better bioavailability than vitamin A from supplements. Plasma concentrations of α-tocopherol (vitamin E) and the carotenoids lycopene, cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin, and lutein did not change under RPO supplementation (Figures 2 and 3). This result is important since few studies reported that supplementation of β-carotene in high dosages (e.g., 20 mg/day for 6.7 years [30] or 100 mg/day for 6 days [31]) may lead to depletion of other carotenoids in the plasma. However, beside β-carotene, these other carotenoids are also of importance because of their particular functions [32]. Two examples are lutein and zeaxanthin which were also shown to be diminished in CF patients [33]. As a consequence, affected CF patients were reported to show a significantly decreased macular pigment density in the retina [33]. This effect is considered to be clinically relevant because lutein, its metabolite mesozeaxanthin, and zeaxanthin are localized in different regions of the human retina serving as optical filter and antioxidant to protect the retinal tissue [34, 35].


Supplementation with red palm oil increases β-carotene and vitamin A blood levels in patients with cystic fibrosis.

Sommerburg O, De Spirt S, Mattern A, Joachim C, Langhans CD, Nesaretnam K, Siems W, Stahl W, Mall MA - Mediators Inflamm. (2015)

Plasma concentrations of retinol and α-tocopherol at baseline and after RPO supplementation. Values are given in μmol/L. Concentration of retinol was significantly increased (day 56) when compared with baseline (day 0) (**P < 0.001). Concentration of α-tocopherol remained unchained compared with baseline.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321850&req=5

fig2: Plasma concentrations of retinol and α-tocopherol at baseline and after RPO supplementation. Values are given in μmol/L. Concentration of retinol was significantly increased (day 56) when compared with baseline (day 0) (**P < 0.001). Concentration of α-tocopherol remained unchained compared with baseline.
Mentions: Intervention with RPO also increased plasma retinol in all of the 11 CF patients. The changes were statistically significant (P < 0.001, Figure 2). Notably, this result was seen despite the parallel supplementation of vitamin A which was administered continuously to maintain vitamin A plasma values in the normal range. One explanation for that result might be that β-carotene from RPO may have a much better bioavailability than vitamin A from supplements. Plasma concentrations of α-tocopherol (vitamin E) and the carotenoids lycopene, cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin, and lutein did not change under RPO supplementation (Figures 2 and 3). This result is important since few studies reported that supplementation of β-carotene in high dosages (e.g., 20 mg/day for 6.7 years [30] or 100 mg/day for 6 days [31]) may lead to depletion of other carotenoids in the plasma. However, beside β-carotene, these other carotenoids are also of importance because of their particular functions [32]. Two examples are lutein and zeaxanthin which were also shown to be diminished in CF patients [33]. As a consequence, affected CF patients were reported to show a significantly decreased macular pigment density in the retina [33]. This effect is considered to be clinically relevant because lutein, its metabolite mesozeaxanthin, and zeaxanthin are localized in different regions of the human retina serving as optical filter and antioxidant to protect the retinal tissue [34, 35].

Bottom Line: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of daily intake of red palm oil (RPO) containing high amounts of β-carotene on the antioxidant levels in CF patients.Plasma β-carotene, retinol, and α-carotene of these patients increased, but plasma concentrations of other carotenoids and α-tocopherol as well as concentrations of β-carotene, lycopene, α-tocopherol, and vitamin C in BMC remained unchanged.Since RPO on a daily basis did not show negative side effects the data suggest that RPO may be used to elevate plasma β-carotene in CF.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pediatric Pulmonology & Allergy and Cystic Fibrosis Centre, Department of Pediatrics III, Children's Hospital, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 430, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany ; Translational Lung Research Centre Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Centre for Lung Research (DZL), Im Neuenheimer Feld 350, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) show decreased plasma concentrations of antioxidants due to malabsorption of lipid soluble vitamins and consumption by chronic pulmonary inflammation. β-Carotene is a major source of retinol and therefore is of particular significance in CF. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of daily intake of red palm oil (RPO) containing high amounts of β-carotene on the antioxidant levels in CF patients. Sixteen subjects were recruited and instructed to enrich their food with 2 to 3 tablespoons of RPO (~1.5 mg of β-carotene) daily over 8 weeks. Carotenoids, retinol, and α-tocopherol were measured in plasma at baseline and after intervention. In addition β-carotene, lycopene, α-tocopherol, and vitamin C were measured in buccal mucosa cells (BMC) to determine the influence of RPO on antioxidant tissue levels. Eleven subjects completed the study properly. Plasma β-carotene, retinol, and α-carotene of these patients increased, but plasma concentrations of other carotenoids and α-tocopherol as well as concentrations of β-carotene, lycopene, α-tocopherol, and vitamin C in BMC remained unchanged. Since RPO on a daily basis did not show negative side effects the data suggest that RPO may be used to elevate plasma β-carotene in CF.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus