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The effect of intravenous iron treatment on quality of life in inflammatory bowel disease patients with nonanemic iron deficiency.

Çekiç C, İpek S, Aslan F, Akpınar Z, Arabul M, Topal F, Sarıtaş Yüksel E, Alper E, Ünsal B - Gastroenterol Res Pract (2015)

Bottom Line: In the 12th week of iron administration, those scores were 162.3 ± 25.5 (P < 0.001), 49.3 ± 6.4 (P < 0.001), and 47.6 ± 8.9 (P = 0.024), respectively, which were all significantly different from the scores prior to iron administration.Conclusion.Intravenous iron treatment may improve QoL in nonanemic, but iron deficient, IBD patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, İzmir Atatürk Training and Research Hospital, Izmir Kâtip Çelebi University, Karabaglar, 35160 İzmir, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Background. Iron deficiency is the prevalent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Herein, we investigated the effect of intravenous iron treatment on quality of life (QoL) in nonanemic and iron deficient IBD patients. Methods. Eighty-five IBD patients were recruited for this study. The patients were intravenously administered 500 mg iron sucrose in the first week of the study. Hematologic parameters and QoL were evaluated before to iron treatment and during the 12th week of treatment. The Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ) and the Short Form-36 (SF-36) Health Survey were used to assess QoL. Results. Prior to intravenous iron administration, the IBDQ, SF-36 Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) scores were 152.3 ± 30.6, 46.7 ± 7.3, and 45.7 ± 9.8, respectively. In the 12th week of iron administration, those scores were 162.3 ± 25.5 (P < 0.001), 49.3 ± 6.4 (P < 0.001), and 47.6 ± 8.9 (P = 0.024), respectively, which were all significantly different from the scores prior to iron administration. The mean changes in the IBDQ scores for ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease were 8.7% and 3.0% (P = 0.029), were 6.4% and 4.7% (P = 0.562) for the SF-36 PCS, and were 4.6% and 3.2% (P = 0.482) for the SF-36 MCS, respectively. Conclusion. Intravenous iron treatment may improve QoL in nonanemic, but iron deficient, IBD patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage changes according to baseline in QoL scores.
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fig2: Percentage changes according to baseline in QoL scores.

Mentions: The QoL measures before and during the 12th week of intravenous iron administration for UC patients are as follows, respectively: IBDQ, 147.4 ± 33.0 and 160.33 ± 28.67 (P < 0.001); SF-36 PCS, 45.7 ± 7.8 and 48.7 ± 6.9 (P < 0.001); and SF-36 MCS, 45.1 ± 10.5 and 47.2 ± 9.5 (P = 0.045). For CD patients, the results were as follows, respectively: IBDQ, 161.1 ± 23.4 and 166 ± 18 (P = 0.049); SF-36 PCS, 48.3 ± 6.1 and 50.6 ± 5.3 (P = 0.01); and SF-36 MCS: 46.7 ± 8.3 and 48.2 ± 8.1 (P = 0.462). QoL changes between pretreatment and posttreatment (12th week) intervals are shown in Table 2 and Figure 2.


The effect of intravenous iron treatment on quality of life in inflammatory bowel disease patients with nonanemic iron deficiency.

Çekiç C, İpek S, Aslan F, Akpınar Z, Arabul M, Topal F, Sarıtaş Yüksel E, Alper E, Ünsal B - Gastroenterol Res Pract (2015)

Percentage changes according to baseline in QoL scores.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321675&req=5

fig2: Percentage changes according to baseline in QoL scores.
Mentions: The QoL measures before and during the 12th week of intravenous iron administration for UC patients are as follows, respectively: IBDQ, 147.4 ± 33.0 and 160.33 ± 28.67 (P < 0.001); SF-36 PCS, 45.7 ± 7.8 and 48.7 ± 6.9 (P < 0.001); and SF-36 MCS, 45.1 ± 10.5 and 47.2 ± 9.5 (P = 0.045). For CD patients, the results were as follows, respectively: IBDQ, 161.1 ± 23.4 and 166 ± 18 (P = 0.049); SF-36 PCS, 48.3 ± 6.1 and 50.6 ± 5.3 (P = 0.01); and SF-36 MCS: 46.7 ± 8.3 and 48.2 ± 8.1 (P = 0.462). QoL changes between pretreatment and posttreatment (12th week) intervals are shown in Table 2 and Figure 2.

Bottom Line: In the 12th week of iron administration, those scores were 162.3 ± 25.5 (P < 0.001), 49.3 ± 6.4 (P < 0.001), and 47.6 ± 8.9 (P = 0.024), respectively, which were all significantly different from the scores prior to iron administration.Conclusion.Intravenous iron treatment may improve QoL in nonanemic, but iron deficient, IBD patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, İzmir Atatürk Training and Research Hospital, Izmir Kâtip Çelebi University, Karabaglar, 35160 İzmir, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Background. Iron deficiency is the prevalent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Herein, we investigated the effect of intravenous iron treatment on quality of life (QoL) in nonanemic and iron deficient IBD patients. Methods. Eighty-five IBD patients were recruited for this study. The patients were intravenously administered 500 mg iron sucrose in the first week of the study. Hematologic parameters and QoL were evaluated before to iron treatment and during the 12th week of treatment. The Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ) and the Short Form-36 (SF-36) Health Survey were used to assess QoL. Results. Prior to intravenous iron administration, the IBDQ, SF-36 Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) scores were 152.3 ± 30.6, 46.7 ± 7.3, and 45.7 ± 9.8, respectively. In the 12th week of iron administration, those scores were 162.3 ± 25.5 (P < 0.001), 49.3 ± 6.4 (P < 0.001), and 47.6 ± 8.9 (P = 0.024), respectively, which were all significantly different from the scores prior to iron administration. The mean changes in the IBDQ scores for ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease were 8.7% and 3.0% (P = 0.029), were 6.4% and 4.7% (P = 0.562) for the SF-36 PCS, and were 4.6% and 3.2% (P = 0.482) for the SF-36 MCS, respectively. Conclusion. Intravenous iron treatment may improve QoL in nonanemic, but iron deficient, IBD patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus