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Autistic empathy toward autistic others.

Komeda H, Kosaka H, Saito DN, Mano Y, Jung M, Fujii T, Yanaka HT, Munesue T, Ishitobi M, Sato M, Okazawa H - Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: The results demonstrated that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated in individuals with ASD in response to autistic characters and in TD individuals in response to non-autistic characters.Although the frontal-posterior network between the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and superior temporal gyrus participated in the processing of non-autistic characters in TD individuals, an alternative network was involved when individuals with ASD processed autistic characters.This suggests an atypical form of empathy in individuals with ASD toward others with ASD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Hakubi Center for Advanced Research, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan, Research Center for Child Mental Development, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193, Japan, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193, Japan, Division of Developmental Higher Brain Functions, Department of Child Development, United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Kanazawa University, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Chiba University and University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193, Japan, Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193, Japan, Department of Psychology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-2710, USA, Department of Psychiatry, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry Hospital, 4-1-1, Ogawahigashi, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8551, Japan, Faculty of Regional Sciences, Tottori University, Koyamacho-Minami, Tottori City 680-8551, Japan, Research Center for Child Mental Development, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-8640, Japan, Department of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8553, Japan, Division of Developmental Neuroscience, United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Kanazawa University, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Chiba University and University of Fukui, 2-2, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan, and Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan komeda.hidetsugu.5w@kyoto-u.ac.jp.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Behavioral results for self- and other judgments. The number of Yes responses is shown in ASD and TD groups. Because 48 trials were conducted under each condition, scores ranged between 0 and 48. Dark orange bars denote self-judgments for autistic characters; light orange bars denote other judgments for autistic characters; dark blue bars denote self-judgments for non-autistic characters; and light blue bars denote other judgments for non-autistic characters. Error bars indicate standard errors. *P < 0.05.
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nsu126-F2: Behavioral results for self- and other judgments. The number of Yes responses is shown in ASD and TD groups. Because 48 trials were conducted under each condition, scores ranged between 0 and 48. Dark orange bars denote self-judgments for autistic characters; light orange bars denote other judgments for autistic characters; dark blue bars denote self-judgments for non-autistic characters; and light blue bars denote other judgments for non-autistic characters. Error bars indicate standard errors. *P < 0.05.

Mentions: We conducted a three-way ANOVA based on the number of ‘Yes’ responses with group (ASD or TD) as a between-subjects factor and character type (autistic or non-autistic) and judgments (self or other) as within-subject factors (Figure 2, Table 2). The behavioral results revealed a significant interaction between group and character (F(1, 28) = 23.58, P < 0.05, MSe (mean squared error) = 265.02, Prep = 0.99, = 0.46). Post hoc analyses showed that the ASD group gave Yes responses for autistic characters more than the TD group did (F(1, 28) = 14.60, P < 0.05, MSe = 185.40, Prep = 0.99, = 0.34), whereas the TD group gave Yes responses for non-autistic characters more than the ASD participants did (F(1, 28) = 29.76, P < 0.05, MSe = 120.05, Prep = 0.99, = 0.52).Fig. 2


Autistic empathy toward autistic others.

Komeda H, Kosaka H, Saito DN, Mano Y, Jung M, Fujii T, Yanaka HT, Munesue T, Ishitobi M, Sato M, Okazawa H - Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci (2014)

Behavioral results for self- and other judgments. The number of Yes responses is shown in ASD and TD groups. Because 48 trials were conducted under each condition, scores ranged between 0 and 48. Dark orange bars denote self-judgments for autistic characters; light orange bars denote other judgments for autistic characters; dark blue bars denote self-judgments for non-autistic characters; and light blue bars denote other judgments for non-autistic characters. Error bars indicate standard errors. *P < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321632&req=5

nsu126-F2: Behavioral results for self- and other judgments. The number of Yes responses is shown in ASD and TD groups. Because 48 trials were conducted under each condition, scores ranged between 0 and 48. Dark orange bars denote self-judgments for autistic characters; light orange bars denote other judgments for autistic characters; dark blue bars denote self-judgments for non-autistic characters; and light blue bars denote other judgments for non-autistic characters. Error bars indicate standard errors. *P < 0.05.
Mentions: We conducted a three-way ANOVA based on the number of ‘Yes’ responses with group (ASD or TD) as a between-subjects factor and character type (autistic or non-autistic) and judgments (self or other) as within-subject factors (Figure 2, Table 2). The behavioral results revealed a significant interaction between group and character (F(1, 28) = 23.58, P < 0.05, MSe (mean squared error) = 265.02, Prep = 0.99, = 0.46). Post hoc analyses showed that the ASD group gave Yes responses for autistic characters more than the TD group did (F(1, 28) = 14.60, P < 0.05, MSe = 185.40, Prep = 0.99, = 0.34), whereas the TD group gave Yes responses for non-autistic characters more than the ASD participants did (F(1, 28) = 29.76, P < 0.05, MSe = 120.05, Prep = 0.99, = 0.52).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: The results demonstrated that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated in individuals with ASD in response to autistic characters and in TD individuals in response to non-autistic characters.Although the frontal-posterior network between the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and superior temporal gyrus participated in the processing of non-autistic characters in TD individuals, an alternative network was involved when individuals with ASD processed autistic characters.This suggests an atypical form of empathy in individuals with ASD toward others with ASD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Hakubi Center for Advanced Research, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan, Research Center for Child Mental Development, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193, Japan, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193, Japan, Division of Developmental Higher Brain Functions, Department of Child Development, United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Kanazawa University, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Chiba University and University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193, Japan, Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193, Japan, Department of Psychology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-2710, USA, Department of Psychiatry, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry Hospital, 4-1-1, Ogawahigashi, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8551, Japan, Faculty of Regional Sciences, Tottori University, Koyamacho-Minami, Tottori City 680-8551, Japan, Research Center for Child Mental Development, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-8640, Japan, Department of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8553, Japan, Division of Developmental Neuroscience, United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Kanazawa University, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Chiba University and University of Fukui, 2-2, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan, and Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan komeda.hidetsugu.5w@kyoto-u.ac.jp.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus