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Functional inactivation of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase 1 (UAP1) induces early leaf senescence and defence responses in rice.

Wang Z, Wang Y, Hong X, Hu D, Liu C, Yang J, Li Y, Huang Y, Feng Y, Gong H, Li Y, Fang G, Tang H, Li Y - J. Exp. Bot. (2014)

Bottom Line: The SPL29 gene was identified by map-based cloning, and SPL29 was confirmed as UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase 1 (UAP1) by enzymatic analysis.ROS and plant hormones probably play important roles in early leaf senescence and defence responses in the spl29 mutant.Based on these findings, it is suggested that UAP1 is involved in regulating leaf senescence and defence responses in rice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Hybrid Rice, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Hubei 430072, China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Leaf phenotype of wild-type and spl29 mutant plants. (A) Plants at the seedling stage (28 days after germination). (B) Plants at the tillering stage (50 days after germination). (C) Plants at the ripening stage (115 days after germination). (D) Phenotype of the second-emerged leaf after germination of plants at the seedling stage, corresponding to (A). (E) Phenotype of the first, second, third, and fourth fully expanded leaves from the tip to the base of the main tiller of plants at the tillering stage, corresponding to (B). (F) Flag-leaf phenotype of plants 90 days after germination. The spl29 leaf area in the red square frame is magnified on the right.
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Figure 1: Leaf phenotype of wild-type and spl29 mutant plants. (A) Plants at the seedling stage (28 days after germination). (B) Plants at the tillering stage (50 days after germination). (C) Plants at the ripening stage (115 days after germination). (D) Phenotype of the second-emerged leaf after germination of plants at the seedling stage, corresponding to (A). (E) Phenotype of the first, second, third, and fourth fully expanded leaves from the tip to the base of the main tiller of plants at the tillering stage, corresponding to (B). (F) Flag-leaf phenotype of plants 90 days after germination. The spl29 leaf area in the red square frame is magnified on the right.

Mentions: Small, dark-brown LM leaf spots (followed by rapid leaf senescence) appeared on spl29 plants from the seedling stage to the ripening stage (Fig. 1A, B, and C). However, newly emerging leaves showed no difference to wild-type plants. During the seedling stage, abundant leaf spots had appeared on spl29 plants by 28 days after germination, with leaves exhibiting chlorosis beside the spots (Fig. 1D). After the appearance of leaf spots and chlorosis, the leaves withered from the tip to the base in about five days (Supplementary Figure S2). The severity of leaf mutant phenotypes varied for different leaves of a single spl29 plant at the tillering stage 50 days after germination (Fig. 1E). No spots were present on the first new fully expanded leaf, whereas the third leaf from the top of the main tiller had larger and more numerous spots and associated chlorosis than the second leaf, and at this point the fourth leaf was already withered and dead. By contrast, the corresponding leaves on the wild-type plant grew normally. When the last emerging flag leaf was filled with spots (Fig. 1F), the spl29 plants began to senesce far earlier than wild-type plants. In addition to the obvious leaf phenotype, the plant height, panicle length, total grain number, filled grain number, seed-setting rate, and thousand-grain weight of the spl29 mutants were all significantly decreased when compared with the wild-type plants (Table 1).


Functional inactivation of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase 1 (UAP1) induces early leaf senescence and defence responses in rice.

Wang Z, Wang Y, Hong X, Hu D, Liu C, Yang J, Li Y, Huang Y, Feng Y, Gong H, Li Y, Fang G, Tang H, Li Y - J. Exp. Bot. (2014)

Leaf phenotype of wild-type and spl29 mutant plants. (A) Plants at the seedling stage (28 days after germination). (B) Plants at the tillering stage (50 days after germination). (C) Plants at the ripening stage (115 days after germination). (D) Phenotype of the second-emerged leaf after germination of plants at the seedling stage, corresponding to (A). (E) Phenotype of the first, second, third, and fourth fully expanded leaves from the tip to the base of the main tiller of plants at the tillering stage, corresponding to (B). (F) Flag-leaf phenotype of plants 90 days after germination. The spl29 leaf area in the red square frame is magnified on the right.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321554&req=5

Figure 1: Leaf phenotype of wild-type and spl29 mutant plants. (A) Plants at the seedling stage (28 days after germination). (B) Plants at the tillering stage (50 days after germination). (C) Plants at the ripening stage (115 days after germination). (D) Phenotype of the second-emerged leaf after germination of plants at the seedling stage, corresponding to (A). (E) Phenotype of the first, second, third, and fourth fully expanded leaves from the tip to the base of the main tiller of plants at the tillering stage, corresponding to (B). (F) Flag-leaf phenotype of plants 90 days after germination. The spl29 leaf area in the red square frame is magnified on the right.
Mentions: Small, dark-brown LM leaf spots (followed by rapid leaf senescence) appeared on spl29 plants from the seedling stage to the ripening stage (Fig. 1A, B, and C). However, newly emerging leaves showed no difference to wild-type plants. During the seedling stage, abundant leaf spots had appeared on spl29 plants by 28 days after germination, with leaves exhibiting chlorosis beside the spots (Fig. 1D). After the appearance of leaf spots and chlorosis, the leaves withered from the tip to the base in about five days (Supplementary Figure S2). The severity of leaf mutant phenotypes varied for different leaves of a single spl29 plant at the tillering stage 50 days after germination (Fig. 1E). No spots were present on the first new fully expanded leaf, whereas the third leaf from the top of the main tiller had larger and more numerous spots and associated chlorosis than the second leaf, and at this point the fourth leaf was already withered and dead. By contrast, the corresponding leaves on the wild-type plant grew normally. When the last emerging flag leaf was filled with spots (Fig. 1F), the spl29 plants began to senesce far earlier than wild-type plants. In addition to the obvious leaf phenotype, the plant height, panicle length, total grain number, filled grain number, seed-setting rate, and thousand-grain weight of the spl29 mutants were all significantly decreased when compared with the wild-type plants (Table 1).

Bottom Line: The SPL29 gene was identified by map-based cloning, and SPL29 was confirmed as UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase 1 (UAP1) by enzymatic analysis.ROS and plant hormones probably play important roles in early leaf senescence and defence responses in the spl29 mutant.Based on these findings, it is suggested that UAP1 is involved in regulating leaf senescence and defence responses in rice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Hybrid Rice, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Hubei 430072, China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus