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Higher sterol content regulated by CYP51 with concomitant lower phospholipid content in membranes is a common strategy for aluminium tolerance in several plant species.

Wagatsuma T, Khan MS, Watanabe T, Maejima E, Sekimoto H, Yokota T, Nakano T, Toyomasu T, Tawaraya K, Koyama H, Uemura M, Ishikawa S, Ikka T, Ishikawa A, Kawamura T, Murakami S, Ueki N, Umetsu A, Kannari T - J. Exp. Bot. (2014)

Bottom Line: Several studies have shown that differences in lipid composition and in the lipid biosynthetic pathway affect the aluminium (Al) tolerance of plants, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences.Currency).This appears to be a common strategy for Al tolerance among several plant species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Agriculture, Yamagata University, Tsuruoka 997-8555, Japan wagatuma@tds1.tr.yamagata-u.ac.jp.

No MeSH data available.


Difference in growth pattern between wild-type (Col-0) and CYP51 knocked-down line of Arabidopsis (AtCYP51-KD-1) after Al treatment (A) and Al tolerance of Col-0 and CYP51 knocked-down line-1 (B). Three-day-old synchronously germinated Arabidopsis seedlings of Col-0 and CYP51 knocked-down line-1 were treated with or without 4 µM AlCl3 (pH 5.0) for 7 days. After acquiring images with a digital camera attached to a stereoscopic microscope, the length of each root in each image was measured using Image J software. Al tolerance was calculated as the ratio of root length in Al treatment to that in the control. Ten seedlings were used for each measurement. Values are means of three independent replicates ± standard error. Different lower case letters above each column indicate significant differences at a 5% level. Scale bar, 2mm.
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Figure 7: Difference in growth pattern between wild-type (Col-0) and CYP51 knocked-down line of Arabidopsis (AtCYP51-KD-1) after Al treatment (A) and Al tolerance of Col-0 and CYP51 knocked-down line-1 (B). Three-day-old synchronously germinated Arabidopsis seedlings of Col-0 and CYP51 knocked-down line-1 were treated with or without 4 µM AlCl3 (pH 5.0) for 7 days. After acquiring images with a digital camera attached to a stereoscopic microscope, the length of each root in each image was measured using Image J software. Al tolerance was calculated as the ratio of root length in Al treatment to that in the control. Ten seedlings were used for each measurement. Values are means of three independent replicates ± standard error. Different lower case letters above each column indicate significant differences at a 5% level. Scale bar, 2mm.

Mentions: The results described above suggested that sterol biosynthesis, which is regulated by CYP51, plays a role in Al tolerance in various plant species. To further test this possibility, the Al tolerance of a transgenic Arabidopsis line with knocked-down AtCYP51 expression (AtCYP51-KD-1; Kushiro et al., 2001) was analysed. The root growth of AtCYP51-KD-1 was comparable to that of the wild-type Col-0 in control medium, but was inhibited in Al-containing medium (Fig. 7A, B). After 24h of Al treatment, the plasma membrane at the root-tip portion of AtCYP51-KD-1 was damaged (Fig. 8A) and more Al accumulated in the root tissues of AtCYP51-KD-1 than in those of Col-0 (Fig. 8B). The ratio of phospholipids to sterols was higher in AtCYP51-KD-1 than in Col-0 (Fig. 9), indicating greater negativity of the plasma membrane surface in AtCYP51-KD-1 than in Col-0. Because malate excretion was similar in Col-0 and AtCYP51-KD-1 under Al-stressed conditions (Supplementary Figure S2; Fig. 10), it is likely that the plasma membrane lipid composition had been altered as a result of suppression of CYP51, which enhanced the Al sensitivity of AtCYP51-KD-1.


Higher sterol content regulated by CYP51 with concomitant lower phospholipid content in membranes is a common strategy for aluminium tolerance in several plant species.

Wagatsuma T, Khan MS, Watanabe T, Maejima E, Sekimoto H, Yokota T, Nakano T, Toyomasu T, Tawaraya K, Koyama H, Uemura M, Ishikawa S, Ikka T, Ishikawa A, Kawamura T, Murakami S, Ueki N, Umetsu A, Kannari T - J. Exp. Bot. (2014)

Difference in growth pattern between wild-type (Col-0) and CYP51 knocked-down line of Arabidopsis (AtCYP51-KD-1) after Al treatment (A) and Al tolerance of Col-0 and CYP51 knocked-down line-1 (B). Three-day-old synchronously germinated Arabidopsis seedlings of Col-0 and CYP51 knocked-down line-1 were treated with or without 4 µM AlCl3 (pH 5.0) for 7 days. After acquiring images with a digital camera attached to a stereoscopic microscope, the length of each root in each image was measured using Image J software. Al tolerance was calculated as the ratio of root length in Al treatment to that in the control. Ten seedlings were used for each measurement. Values are means of three independent replicates ± standard error. Different lower case letters above each column indicate significant differences at a 5% level. Scale bar, 2mm.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
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Figure 7: Difference in growth pattern between wild-type (Col-0) and CYP51 knocked-down line of Arabidopsis (AtCYP51-KD-1) after Al treatment (A) and Al tolerance of Col-0 and CYP51 knocked-down line-1 (B). Three-day-old synchronously germinated Arabidopsis seedlings of Col-0 and CYP51 knocked-down line-1 were treated with or without 4 µM AlCl3 (pH 5.0) for 7 days. After acquiring images with a digital camera attached to a stereoscopic microscope, the length of each root in each image was measured using Image J software. Al tolerance was calculated as the ratio of root length in Al treatment to that in the control. Ten seedlings were used for each measurement. Values are means of three independent replicates ± standard error. Different lower case letters above each column indicate significant differences at a 5% level. Scale bar, 2mm.
Mentions: The results described above suggested that sterol biosynthesis, which is regulated by CYP51, plays a role in Al tolerance in various plant species. To further test this possibility, the Al tolerance of a transgenic Arabidopsis line with knocked-down AtCYP51 expression (AtCYP51-KD-1; Kushiro et al., 2001) was analysed. The root growth of AtCYP51-KD-1 was comparable to that of the wild-type Col-0 in control medium, but was inhibited in Al-containing medium (Fig. 7A, B). After 24h of Al treatment, the plasma membrane at the root-tip portion of AtCYP51-KD-1 was damaged (Fig. 8A) and more Al accumulated in the root tissues of AtCYP51-KD-1 than in those of Col-0 (Fig. 8B). The ratio of phospholipids to sterols was higher in AtCYP51-KD-1 than in Col-0 (Fig. 9), indicating greater negativity of the plasma membrane surface in AtCYP51-KD-1 than in Col-0. Because malate excretion was similar in Col-0 and AtCYP51-KD-1 under Al-stressed conditions (Supplementary Figure S2; Fig. 10), it is likely that the plasma membrane lipid composition had been altered as a result of suppression of CYP51, which enhanced the Al sensitivity of AtCYP51-KD-1.

Bottom Line: Several studies have shown that differences in lipid composition and in the lipid biosynthetic pathway affect the aluminium (Al) tolerance of plants, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences.Currency).This appears to be a common strategy for Al tolerance among several plant species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Agriculture, Yamagata University, Tsuruoka 997-8555, Japan wagatuma@tds1.tr.yamagata-u.ac.jp.

No MeSH data available.