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Water relations traits of C4 grasses depend on phylogenetic lineage, photosynthetic pathway, and habitat water availability.

Liu H, Osborne CP - J. Exp. Bot. (2014)

Bottom Line: Specifically, phylogeny tended to have a stronger influence on structural traits, and C4 subtype had more important effects on physiological traits.Although hydraulic traits did not differ consistently between lineages, they showed strong covariation and relationships with leaf structure.This work expands our understanding of ecophysiology in major C4 grass lineages, with implications for explaining their regional and global distributions in relation to climate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S10 2TN, UK Key Laboratory of Vegetation Restoration and Management of Degraded Ecosystems, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xingke Road 723, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510650, PR China.

No MeSH data available.


Correlations among leaf hydraulic traits. (A) TLP with LDMC, Young’s modulus of elasticity (ε) with (B) LDMC, (C) RWC at TLP, and (D) leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf).
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Figure 5: Correlations among leaf hydraulic traits. (A) TLP with LDMC, Young’s modulus of elasticity (ε) with (B) LDMC, (C) RWC at TLP, and (D) leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf).

Mentions: There were relationships among different hydraulic and structural traits. Both TLP and ε increased with LDMC, suggesting that greater LDMC was associated with less elasticity and a more negative TLP (Fig. 5A, B). The ε was positively related with RWC at the TLP, meaning that a steeper initial fall in pressure potential with RWC led to higher RWC at the TLP (Fig. 5C). ε was negatively related with Kleaf, such that that the most elastic leaves also had the highest hydraulic conductance (Fig. 5D). Other leaf traits such as SLA, leaf thickness, and volume were also explored in the tests, but only LDMC showed significant relationships with hydraulic traits.


Water relations traits of C4 grasses depend on phylogenetic lineage, photosynthetic pathway, and habitat water availability.

Liu H, Osborne CP - J. Exp. Bot. (2014)

Correlations among leaf hydraulic traits. (A) TLP with LDMC, Young’s modulus of elasticity (ε) with (B) LDMC, (C) RWC at TLP, and (D) leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321540&req=5

Figure 5: Correlations among leaf hydraulic traits. (A) TLP with LDMC, Young’s modulus of elasticity (ε) with (B) LDMC, (C) RWC at TLP, and (D) leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf).
Mentions: There were relationships among different hydraulic and structural traits. Both TLP and ε increased with LDMC, suggesting that greater LDMC was associated with less elasticity and a more negative TLP (Fig. 5A, B). The ε was positively related with RWC at the TLP, meaning that a steeper initial fall in pressure potential with RWC led to higher RWC at the TLP (Fig. 5C). ε was negatively related with Kleaf, such that that the most elastic leaves also had the highest hydraulic conductance (Fig. 5D). Other leaf traits such as SLA, leaf thickness, and volume were also explored in the tests, but only LDMC showed significant relationships with hydraulic traits.

Bottom Line: Specifically, phylogeny tended to have a stronger influence on structural traits, and C4 subtype had more important effects on physiological traits.Although hydraulic traits did not differ consistently between lineages, they showed strong covariation and relationships with leaf structure.This work expands our understanding of ecophysiology in major C4 grass lineages, with implications for explaining their regional and global distributions in relation to climate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S10 2TN, UK Key Laboratory of Vegetation Restoration and Management of Degraded Ecosystems, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xingke Road 723, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510650, PR China.

No MeSH data available.