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Melatonin enhances plant growth and abiotic stress tolerance in soybean plants.

Wei W, Li QT, Chu YN, Reiter RJ, Yu XM, Zhu DH, Zhang WK, Ma B, Lin Q, Zhang JS, Chen SY - J. Exp. Bot. (2014)

Bottom Line: In the present study, we tested the effect of melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) on soybean growth and development.Transcriptome analysis revealed that salt stress inhibited expressions of genes related to binding, oxidoreductase activity/process, and secondary metabolic processes.Melatonin up-regulated expressions of the genes inhibited by salt stress, and hence alleviated the inhibitory effects of salt stress on gene expressions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Plant Genomics, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chaoyang District, Beichen West Road, Campus #1, No.2, Beijing 100101, China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Performance of melatonin-treated seedlings in response to salt stress. (A) Melatonin effects on seedlings treated with 1% salt for one week. (B) Melatonin action on plant height after salt stress. (C) Phenotypes of one-week-old treated seedlings after melatonin and salt treatments. (D) Comparison of leaf area after treatments. (E) Reduction in biomass after treatments. Reduced proportion of biomass (dry weight)=[(biomass of well-watered plants)–(biomass of salt-treated plants)]/(biomass of well-watered plants). (F) Phenotypes of three-week-old treated seedlings. (G) Chlorophyll contents in soybean leaves after salt stress. Left part represents content of chlorophyll A, and right part represents content of chlorophyll B. (H) DAB staining. Brown colour indicates accumulation of H2O2. Bars=1cm. (I) Relative electrolyte leakage in treated plants. * and ** indicate significant differences (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively) compared with mock coating (0 µM). Bars indicate standard deviation. For leaf area and plant height, n=36; for biomass analysis, n=10; for chlorophyll test, n=3; for relative electrolyte leakage, n=5.
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Figure 4: Performance of melatonin-treated seedlings in response to salt stress. (A) Melatonin effects on seedlings treated with 1% salt for one week. (B) Melatonin action on plant height after salt stress. (C) Phenotypes of one-week-old treated seedlings after melatonin and salt treatments. (D) Comparison of leaf area after treatments. (E) Reduction in biomass after treatments. Reduced proportion of biomass (dry weight)=[(biomass of well-watered plants)–(biomass of salt-treated plants)]/(biomass of well-watered plants). (F) Phenotypes of three-week-old treated seedlings. (G) Chlorophyll contents in soybean leaves after salt stress. Left part represents content of chlorophyll A, and right part represents content of chlorophyll B. (H) DAB staining. Brown colour indicates accumulation of H2O2. Bars=1cm. (I) Relative electrolyte leakage in treated plants. * and ** indicate significant differences (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively) compared with mock coating (0 µM). Bars indicate standard deviation. For leaf area and plant height, n=36; for biomass analysis, n=10; for chlorophyll test, n=3; for relative electrolyte leakage, n=5.

Mentions: We further tested whether melatonin had any effects on abiotic stress responses in soybean plants. Five-day-old seedlings from melatonin-coated seeds were grown in soil with 1% (w/v) NaCl. One week later, leaf area and plant height were measured. Melatonin-treated seedlings were taller and had larger leaves than the control plants (Fig. 4A–D). The treated plants also had a smaller reduction of biomass when compared with the control plants (Fig. 4E). During the third week, the leaves of the control seedlings turned yellow, whereas melatonin-treated seedlings were still green (Fig. 4F). Chlorophyll content was also measured and melatonin-treated plants had similar chlorophyll content as those untreated plants under normal conditions. However, these plants had higher chlorophyll contents than that of control plants after salt treatment (Fig. 4G). DAB staining documented that the control seedlings had higher H2O2 levels than the melatonin-treated seedlings as the leaves of the control seedlings had a deeper brown colour (Fig. 4H). The relative electrolyte leakage was lower in melatonin-treated seedlings compared with the control seedlings under salt stress (Fig. 4I). These findings imply that melatonin increases salt tolerance in soybean plants.


Melatonin enhances plant growth and abiotic stress tolerance in soybean plants.

Wei W, Li QT, Chu YN, Reiter RJ, Yu XM, Zhu DH, Zhang WK, Ma B, Lin Q, Zhang JS, Chen SY - J. Exp. Bot. (2014)

Performance of melatonin-treated seedlings in response to salt stress. (A) Melatonin effects on seedlings treated with 1% salt for one week. (B) Melatonin action on plant height after salt stress. (C) Phenotypes of one-week-old treated seedlings after melatonin and salt treatments. (D) Comparison of leaf area after treatments. (E) Reduction in biomass after treatments. Reduced proportion of biomass (dry weight)=[(biomass of well-watered plants)–(biomass of salt-treated plants)]/(biomass of well-watered plants). (F) Phenotypes of three-week-old treated seedlings. (G) Chlorophyll contents in soybean leaves after salt stress. Left part represents content of chlorophyll A, and right part represents content of chlorophyll B. (H) DAB staining. Brown colour indicates accumulation of H2O2. Bars=1cm. (I) Relative electrolyte leakage in treated plants. * and ** indicate significant differences (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively) compared with mock coating (0 µM). Bars indicate standard deviation. For leaf area and plant height, n=36; for biomass analysis, n=10; for chlorophyll test, n=3; for relative electrolyte leakage, n=5.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 4: Performance of melatonin-treated seedlings in response to salt stress. (A) Melatonin effects on seedlings treated with 1% salt for one week. (B) Melatonin action on plant height after salt stress. (C) Phenotypes of one-week-old treated seedlings after melatonin and salt treatments. (D) Comparison of leaf area after treatments. (E) Reduction in biomass after treatments. Reduced proportion of biomass (dry weight)=[(biomass of well-watered plants)–(biomass of salt-treated plants)]/(biomass of well-watered plants). (F) Phenotypes of three-week-old treated seedlings. (G) Chlorophyll contents in soybean leaves after salt stress. Left part represents content of chlorophyll A, and right part represents content of chlorophyll B. (H) DAB staining. Brown colour indicates accumulation of H2O2. Bars=1cm. (I) Relative electrolyte leakage in treated plants. * and ** indicate significant differences (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively) compared with mock coating (0 µM). Bars indicate standard deviation. For leaf area and plant height, n=36; for biomass analysis, n=10; for chlorophyll test, n=3; for relative electrolyte leakage, n=5.
Mentions: We further tested whether melatonin had any effects on abiotic stress responses in soybean plants. Five-day-old seedlings from melatonin-coated seeds were grown in soil with 1% (w/v) NaCl. One week later, leaf area and plant height were measured. Melatonin-treated seedlings were taller and had larger leaves than the control plants (Fig. 4A–D). The treated plants also had a smaller reduction of biomass when compared with the control plants (Fig. 4E). During the third week, the leaves of the control seedlings turned yellow, whereas melatonin-treated seedlings were still green (Fig. 4F). Chlorophyll content was also measured and melatonin-treated plants had similar chlorophyll content as those untreated plants under normal conditions. However, these plants had higher chlorophyll contents than that of control plants after salt treatment (Fig. 4G). DAB staining documented that the control seedlings had higher H2O2 levels than the melatonin-treated seedlings as the leaves of the control seedlings had a deeper brown colour (Fig. 4H). The relative electrolyte leakage was lower in melatonin-treated seedlings compared with the control seedlings under salt stress (Fig. 4I). These findings imply that melatonin increases salt tolerance in soybean plants.

Bottom Line: In the present study, we tested the effect of melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) on soybean growth and development.Transcriptome analysis revealed that salt stress inhibited expressions of genes related to binding, oxidoreductase activity/process, and secondary metabolic processes.Melatonin up-regulated expressions of the genes inhibited by salt stress, and hence alleviated the inhibitory effects of salt stress on gene expressions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Plant Genomics, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chaoyang District, Beichen West Road, Campus #1, No.2, Beijing 100101, China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus