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Comparative physiological, metabolomic, and transcriptomic analyses reveal mechanisms of improved abiotic stress resistance in bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L). Pers.] by exogenous melatonin.

Shi H, Jiang C, Ye T, Tan DX, Reiter RJ, Zhang H, Liu R, Chan Z - J. Exp. Bot. (2014)

Bottom Line: Pathway and gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analyses revealed that genes involved in nitrogen metabolism, major carbohydrate metabolism, tricarboxylic acid (TCA)/org transformation, transport, hormone metabolism, metal handling, redox, and secondary metabolism were over-represented after melatonin pre-treatment.Taken together, this study provides the first evidence of the protective roles of exogenous melatonin in the bermudagrass response to abiotic stresses, partially via activation of antioxidants and modulation of metabolic homeostasis.Notably, metabolic and transcriptomic analyses showed that the underlying mechanisms of melatonin could involve major reorientation of photorespiratory and carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Plant Germplasm Enhancement and Specialty Agriculture, Wuhan Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430074, China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Hierarchical cluster analysis of metabolites modulated by exogenous melatonin in bermudagrass response to abiotic stress. Hierarchical cluster analysis of 54 metabolites of 28-day-old plants by melatonin effect (melatonin versus control, NaCl+melatonin versus NaCl, drought+melatonin versus drought, 4 °C+melatonin versus 4c°C) and by stress effect (NaCl versus control, drought versus control, 4 °C versus control). The log2 ratios and scale bars are shown in the resulting tree figure, which was obtained using the CLUSTER software package and the Java Treeview. The concentrations of these metabolites are listed in Supplementary Table S2 at JXB online. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
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Figure 5: Hierarchical cluster analysis of metabolites modulated by exogenous melatonin in bermudagrass response to abiotic stress. Hierarchical cluster analysis of 54 metabolites of 28-day-old plants by melatonin effect (melatonin versus control, NaCl+melatonin versus NaCl, drought+melatonin versus drought, 4 °C+melatonin versus 4c°C) and by stress effect (NaCl versus control, drought versus control, 4 °C versus control). The log2 ratios and scale bars are shown in the resulting tree figure, which was obtained using the CLUSTER software package and the Java Treeview. The concentrations of these metabolites are listed in Supplementary Table S2 at JXB online. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)

Mentions: To gain more insights into the modulation of metabolic homeostasis by exogenous melatonin treatment under control and abiotic stress conditions, GC-TOF-MS was performed to identify differentially expressed metabolites. In total, 54 metabolites, comprising 16 amino acids, 13 organic acids, 18 sugars, five sugar alcohols, and two aromatic amines, were reproducibly examined in non-treated and melatonin-pre-treated plants under control and abiotic stress conditions (Fig. 5; Supplementary Table S2 at JXB online). Under control conditions, no significant regular pattern of these metabolites was shown in non-treated and melatonin-pre-treated plants (Fig. 5; Supplementary Table S2). When salt, drought, and cold (4 °C) stresses were applied, melatonin-pre-treated plants exhibited higher concentrations of almost all the 54 metabolites than non-treated plants (Fig. 5; Supplementary Table S2). Additionally, many of these metabolites were commonly regulated by salt, drought, and cold (4°C) stresses (Fig. 5; Supplementary Table S2). Interestingly, 18 metabolites, comprising 10 amino acids, six sugars, and two sugar alcohols, were assigned to the carbon metabolic pathway comprising glycolysis, oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, indicating the direct link between melatonin and the carbon metabolic pathway in bermudagrass response to abiotic stress. Melatonin-pre-treated plants exhibited significantly higher levels of these metabolites than non-treated plants under abiotic stress conditions (Fig. 6A).


Comparative physiological, metabolomic, and transcriptomic analyses reveal mechanisms of improved abiotic stress resistance in bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L). Pers.] by exogenous melatonin.

Shi H, Jiang C, Ye T, Tan DX, Reiter RJ, Zhang H, Liu R, Chan Z - J. Exp. Bot. (2014)

Hierarchical cluster analysis of metabolites modulated by exogenous melatonin in bermudagrass response to abiotic stress. Hierarchical cluster analysis of 54 metabolites of 28-day-old plants by melatonin effect (melatonin versus control, NaCl+melatonin versus NaCl, drought+melatonin versus drought, 4 °C+melatonin versus 4c°C) and by stress effect (NaCl versus control, drought versus control, 4 °C versus control). The log2 ratios and scale bars are shown in the resulting tree figure, which was obtained using the CLUSTER software package and the Java Treeview. The concentrations of these metabolites are listed in Supplementary Table S2 at JXB online. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321537&req=5

Figure 5: Hierarchical cluster analysis of metabolites modulated by exogenous melatonin in bermudagrass response to abiotic stress. Hierarchical cluster analysis of 54 metabolites of 28-day-old plants by melatonin effect (melatonin versus control, NaCl+melatonin versus NaCl, drought+melatonin versus drought, 4 °C+melatonin versus 4c°C) and by stress effect (NaCl versus control, drought versus control, 4 °C versus control). The log2 ratios and scale bars are shown in the resulting tree figure, which was obtained using the CLUSTER software package and the Java Treeview. The concentrations of these metabolites are listed in Supplementary Table S2 at JXB online. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
Mentions: To gain more insights into the modulation of metabolic homeostasis by exogenous melatonin treatment under control and abiotic stress conditions, GC-TOF-MS was performed to identify differentially expressed metabolites. In total, 54 metabolites, comprising 16 amino acids, 13 organic acids, 18 sugars, five sugar alcohols, and two aromatic amines, were reproducibly examined in non-treated and melatonin-pre-treated plants under control and abiotic stress conditions (Fig. 5; Supplementary Table S2 at JXB online). Under control conditions, no significant regular pattern of these metabolites was shown in non-treated and melatonin-pre-treated plants (Fig. 5; Supplementary Table S2). When salt, drought, and cold (4 °C) stresses were applied, melatonin-pre-treated plants exhibited higher concentrations of almost all the 54 metabolites than non-treated plants (Fig. 5; Supplementary Table S2). Additionally, many of these metabolites were commonly regulated by salt, drought, and cold (4°C) stresses (Fig. 5; Supplementary Table S2). Interestingly, 18 metabolites, comprising 10 amino acids, six sugars, and two sugar alcohols, were assigned to the carbon metabolic pathway comprising glycolysis, oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, indicating the direct link between melatonin and the carbon metabolic pathway in bermudagrass response to abiotic stress. Melatonin-pre-treated plants exhibited significantly higher levels of these metabolites than non-treated plants under abiotic stress conditions (Fig. 6A).

Bottom Line: Pathway and gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analyses revealed that genes involved in nitrogen metabolism, major carbohydrate metabolism, tricarboxylic acid (TCA)/org transformation, transport, hormone metabolism, metal handling, redox, and secondary metabolism were over-represented after melatonin pre-treatment.Taken together, this study provides the first evidence of the protective roles of exogenous melatonin in the bermudagrass response to abiotic stresses, partially via activation of antioxidants and modulation of metabolic homeostasis.Notably, metabolic and transcriptomic analyses showed that the underlying mechanisms of melatonin could involve major reorientation of photorespiratory and carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Plant Germplasm Enhancement and Specialty Agriculture, Wuhan Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430074, China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus