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Comparative physiological, metabolomic, and transcriptomic analyses reveal mechanisms of improved abiotic stress resistance in bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L). Pers.] by exogenous melatonin.

Shi H, Jiang C, Ye T, Tan DX, Reiter RJ, Zhang H, Liu R, Chan Z - J. Exp. Bot. (2014)

Bottom Line: Pathway and gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analyses revealed that genes involved in nitrogen metabolism, major carbohydrate metabolism, tricarboxylic acid (TCA)/org transformation, transport, hormone metabolism, metal handling, redox, and secondary metabolism were over-represented after melatonin pre-treatment.Taken together, this study provides the first evidence of the protective roles of exogenous melatonin in the bermudagrass response to abiotic stresses, partially via activation of antioxidants and modulation of metabolic homeostasis.Notably, metabolic and transcriptomic analyses showed that the underlying mechanisms of melatonin could involve major reorientation of photorespiratory and carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Plant Germplasm Enhancement and Specialty Agriculture, Wuhan Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430074, China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effects of exogenous melatonin on ROS-related antioxidants in bermudagrass response to abiotic stress. (A–F) Quantifications of SOD activity (A), CAT activity (B), POD activity (C), GSH (D), GSSG (E), and GSH redox state (F) of 28-day-old plants with different treatments (control and 20 μM melatonin) under control, 300mM NaCl, drought, and cold (4 °C) stress conditions on the designated days. The results shown are the means ±SEs, and bars with different letters above the columns of figures indicate significant differences at P<0.05 (Duncan’s range test).
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Figure 4: Effects of exogenous melatonin on ROS-related antioxidants in bermudagrass response to abiotic stress. (A–F) Quantifications of SOD activity (A), CAT activity (B), POD activity (C), GSH (D), GSSG (E), and GSH redox state (F) of 28-day-old plants with different treatments (control and 20 μM melatonin) under control, 300mM NaCl, drought, and cold (4 °C) stress conditions on the designated days. The results shown are the means ±SEs, and bars with different letters above the columns of figures indicate significant differences at P<0.05 (Duncan’s range test).

Mentions: To alleviate abiotic stress-triggered ROS burst, plants have developed complex antioxidant defence system, including several antioxidant enzymes and non-enzymatic glutathione antioxidant pool. Under control conditions, no significant differences in antioxidant enzymes and the non-enzymatic glutathione antioxidant pool were found between non-treated and melatonin-pre-treated bermudagrass (Fig. 4A–F). Under abiotic stress conditions, the activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, and POD) and the GSSG content were greatly induced, while GSH content was significantly decreased (Fig. 4A–F). Additionally, melatonin-pre-treated plants showed significantly higher activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, and POD) and a higher GSH redox state in comparison with non-treated plants, conferring more effective antioxidants (Fig. 4A–F). These results indicated that melatonin had significant effects on both antioxidant enzymes and the non-enzymatic glutathione antioxidant pool, which might be consistent with alleviated abiotic stress-induced ROS accumulation and related oxidative damage in bermudagrass.


Comparative physiological, metabolomic, and transcriptomic analyses reveal mechanisms of improved abiotic stress resistance in bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L). Pers.] by exogenous melatonin.

Shi H, Jiang C, Ye T, Tan DX, Reiter RJ, Zhang H, Liu R, Chan Z - J. Exp. Bot. (2014)

Effects of exogenous melatonin on ROS-related antioxidants in bermudagrass response to abiotic stress. (A–F) Quantifications of SOD activity (A), CAT activity (B), POD activity (C), GSH (D), GSSG (E), and GSH redox state (F) of 28-day-old plants with different treatments (control and 20 μM melatonin) under control, 300mM NaCl, drought, and cold (4 °C) stress conditions on the designated days. The results shown are the means ±SEs, and bars with different letters above the columns of figures indicate significant differences at P<0.05 (Duncan’s range test).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321537&req=5

Figure 4: Effects of exogenous melatonin on ROS-related antioxidants in bermudagrass response to abiotic stress. (A–F) Quantifications of SOD activity (A), CAT activity (B), POD activity (C), GSH (D), GSSG (E), and GSH redox state (F) of 28-day-old plants with different treatments (control and 20 μM melatonin) under control, 300mM NaCl, drought, and cold (4 °C) stress conditions on the designated days. The results shown are the means ±SEs, and bars with different letters above the columns of figures indicate significant differences at P<0.05 (Duncan’s range test).
Mentions: To alleviate abiotic stress-triggered ROS burst, plants have developed complex antioxidant defence system, including several antioxidant enzymes and non-enzymatic glutathione antioxidant pool. Under control conditions, no significant differences in antioxidant enzymes and the non-enzymatic glutathione antioxidant pool were found between non-treated and melatonin-pre-treated bermudagrass (Fig. 4A–F). Under abiotic stress conditions, the activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, and POD) and the GSSG content were greatly induced, while GSH content was significantly decreased (Fig. 4A–F). Additionally, melatonin-pre-treated plants showed significantly higher activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, and POD) and a higher GSH redox state in comparison with non-treated plants, conferring more effective antioxidants (Fig. 4A–F). These results indicated that melatonin had significant effects on both antioxidant enzymes and the non-enzymatic glutathione antioxidant pool, which might be consistent with alleviated abiotic stress-induced ROS accumulation and related oxidative damage in bermudagrass.

Bottom Line: Pathway and gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analyses revealed that genes involved in nitrogen metabolism, major carbohydrate metabolism, tricarboxylic acid (TCA)/org transformation, transport, hormone metabolism, metal handling, redox, and secondary metabolism were over-represented after melatonin pre-treatment.Taken together, this study provides the first evidence of the protective roles of exogenous melatonin in the bermudagrass response to abiotic stresses, partially via activation of antioxidants and modulation of metabolic homeostasis.Notably, metabolic and transcriptomic analyses showed that the underlying mechanisms of melatonin could involve major reorientation of photorespiratory and carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Plant Germplasm Enhancement and Specialty Agriculture, Wuhan Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430074, China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus