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The association of metacognitive beliefs with emotional distress after diagnosis of cancer.

Cook SA, Salmon P, Dunn G, Holcombe C, Cornford P, Fisher P - Health Psychol (2014)

Bottom Line: Regression analysis showed that metacognitive beliefs were associated with symptoms of anxiety, depression, and PTSD, and explained additional variance in these outcomes after controlling for age, gender, and illness perceptions.Structural equation modeling was consistent with cross-sectional hypotheses derived from the theory that metacognitive beliefs cause and maintain distress both directly and indirectly by driving worry.Further study is required to establish the predictive and clinical utility of these findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological Sciences.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Final path model of relationship between positive and negative metacognitive beliefs and anxiety, depression, and trauma mediated by the CAS-I. Solid lines, p < .05, with standardized coefficients; dotted lines are not significant. Measurement model component of full structural equation model and pathways for covariates (age and gender) is not shown but is available on request from corresponding author. Metacognitions Questionnaire 30 subscales: Positive Beliefs About Worry (POS); Negative Beliefs About Worry (NEG).
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fig3: Final path model of relationship between positive and negative metacognitive beliefs and anxiety, depression, and trauma mediated by the CAS-I. Solid lines, p < .05, with standardized coefficients; dotted lines are not significant. Measurement model component of full structural equation model and pathways for covariates (age and gender) is not shown but is available on request from corresponding author. Metacognitions Questionnaire 30 subscales: Positive Beliefs About Worry (POS); Negative Beliefs About Worry (NEG).

Mentions: The model testing was then repeated using the CAS-I subscale as the mediating variable instead of the PSWQ. The final path model is shown in Figure 3. The model was a good fit, χ2(df = 919) = 1189, p < .001, RMSEA = .037 (90% CI [.03, .04]), CFI/TLI = .98/.97, WRMR = .91. The pattern of significant direct paths seen above was replicated; there were significant direct effects of Negative Beliefs About Worry on anxiety (β = .43, p < .001) and PTSD symptoms (β = .36, p < .001). In addition, there was also a significant indirect effect via the CAS-I on all three outcomes (indirect effects: anxiety, β = .24, p < .001; depression, β = .22, p = .017; PTSD symptoms, β = .32 p < .001). There was no effect of the Positive Beliefs About Worry subscale on either the CAS-I or any of the outcomes.


The association of metacognitive beliefs with emotional distress after diagnosis of cancer.

Cook SA, Salmon P, Dunn G, Holcombe C, Cornford P, Fisher P - Health Psychol (2014)

Final path model of relationship between positive and negative metacognitive beliefs and anxiety, depression, and trauma mediated by the CAS-I. Solid lines, p < .05, with standardized coefficients; dotted lines are not significant. Measurement model component of full structural equation model and pathways for covariates (age and gender) is not shown but is available on request from corresponding author. Metacognitions Questionnaire 30 subscales: Positive Beliefs About Worry (POS); Negative Beliefs About Worry (NEG).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321533&req=5

fig3: Final path model of relationship between positive and negative metacognitive beliefs and anxiety, depression, and trauma mediated by the CAS-I. Solid lines, p < .05, with standardized coefficients; dotted lines are not significant. Measurement model component of full structural equation model and pathways for covariates (age and gender) is not shown but is available on request from corresponding author. Metacognitions Questionnaire 30 subscales: Positive Beliefs About Worry (POS); Negative Beliefs About Worry (NEG).
Mentions: The model testing was then repeated using the CAS-I subscale as the mediating variable instead of the PSWQ. The final path model is shown in Figure 3. The model was a good fit, χ2(df = 919) = 1189, p < .001, RMSEA = .037 (90% CI [.03, .04]), CFI/TLI = .98/.97, WRMR = .91. The pattern of significant direct paths seen above was replicated; there were significant direct effects of Negative Beliefs About Worry on anxiety (β = .43, p < .001) and PTSD symptoms (β = .36, p < .001). In addition, there was also a significant indirect effect via the CAS-I on all three outcomes (indirect effects: anxiety, β = .24, p < .001; depression, β = .22, p = .017; PTSD symptoms, β = .32 p < .001). There was no effect of the Positive Beliefs About Worry subscale on either the CAS-I or any of the outcomes.

Bottom Line: Regression analysis showed that metacognitive beliefs were associated with symptoms of anxiety, depression, and PTSD, and explained additional variance in these outcomes after controlling for age, gender, and illness perceptions.Structural equation modeling was consistent with cross-sectional hypotheses derived from the theory that metacognitive beliefs cause and maintain distress both directly and indirectly by driving worry.Further study is required to establish the predictive and clinical utility of these findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological Sciences.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus