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Processing of unconventional stimuli requires the recruitment of the non-specialized hemisphere.

Kenett YN, Anaki D, Faust M - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: In the present study we investigate hemispheric processing of conventional and unconventional visual stimuli in the context of visual and verbal creative ability.In Experiment 1, we studied two unconventional visual recognition tasks-Mooney face and objects' silhouette recognition-and found a significant relationship between measures of verbal creativity and unconventional face recognition.Our findings demonstrate the role of the non-specialized hemisphere in processing unconventional stimuli and how it relates to creativity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Leslie and Susan Gonda (Goldschmied) Multidisciplinary Brain Research Center, Bar-Ilan University Ramat-Gan, Israel.

ABSTRACT
In the present study we investigate hemispheric processing of conventional and unconventional visual stimuli in the context of visual and verbal creative ability. In Experiment 1, we studied two unconventional visual recognition tasks-Mooney face and objects' silhouette recognition-and found a significant relationship between measures of verbal creativity and unconventional face recognition. In Experiment 2 we used the split visual field (SVF) paradigm to investigate hemispheric processing of conventional and unconventional faces and its relation to verbal and visual characteristics of creativity. Results showed that while conventional faces were better processed by the specialized right hemisphere (RH), unconventional faces were better processed by the non-specialized left hemisphere (LH). In addition, only unconventional face processing by the non-specialized LH was related to verbal and visual measures of creative ability. Our findings demonstrate the role of the non-specialized hemisphere in processing unconventional stimuli and how it relates to creativity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Behavioral analysis of the two visual tasks. (A) Mooney face accuracy analysis—X-axis represents the three questions of the task, Y-axis—mean accuracy rate (including error bars). (B) silhouette accuracy analysis—X-axis represents the four difficulty categories of the task, Y-axis—mean accuracy rate (including error bars).
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Figure 2: Behavioral analysis of the two visual tasks. (A) Mooney face accuracy analysis—X-axis represents the three questions of the task, Y-axis—mean accuracy rate (including error bars). (B) silhouette accuracy analysis—X-axis represents the four difficulty categories of the task, Y-axis—mean accuracy rate (including error bars).

Mentions: Analysis of the Mooney face recognition task revealed differences in accuracy for the three questions (sex, pose, and age), F(1,34) = 38.77, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.589 (Figure 2A). Post hoc analysis showed greater accuracy in the sex identification task than in the pose and age identification tasks (all p’s < 0.001). Power analysis of the Mooney task indicated that with our sample size and effect size estimation, we had sufficient power to detect a significant main effect (power = 0.99). Analysis of the silhouette task revealed a significant effect of stimuli difficulty on the mean identification accuracy, F(2,64) = 487.704, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.948 (Figure 2B). Post hoc analyses revealed that each difficulty level significantly differed from all others (all p’s < 0.001), with a rapid decline of mean accuracy from 0.95 accuracy rate in the easy category to 0.07 accuracy rate in the very hard category. Power analysis of the silhouette task indicated that with our sample size and effect size estimation, we had sufficient power to detect a significant main effect (power = 0.99).


Processing of unconventional stimuli requires the recruitment of the non-specialized hemisphere.

Kenett YN, Anaki D, Faust M - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

Behavioral analysis of the two visual tasks. (A) Mooney face accuracy analysis—X-axis represents the three questions of the task, Y-axis—mean accuracy rate (including error bars). (B) silhouette accuracy analysis—X-axis represents the four difficulty categories of the task, Y-axis—mean accuracy rate (including error bars).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321434&req=5

Figure 2: Behavioral analysis of the two visual tasks. (A) Mooney face accuracy analysis—X-axis represents the three questions of the task, Y-axis—mean accuracy rate (including error bars). (B) silhouette accuracy analysis—X-axis represents the four difficulty categories of the task, Y-axis—mean accuracy rate (including error bars).
Mentions: Analysis of the Mooney face recognition task revealed differences in accuracy for the three questions (sex, pose, and age), F(1,34) = 38.77, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.589 (Figure 2A). Post hoc analysis showed greater accuracy in the sex identification task than in the pose and age identification tasks (all p’s < 0.001). Power analysis of the Mooney task indicated that with our sample size and effect size estimation, we had sufficient power to detect a significant main effect (power = 0.99). Analysis of the silhouette task revealed a significant effect of stimuli difficulty on the mean identification accuracy, F(2,64) = 487.704, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.948 (Figure 2B). Post hoc analyses revealed that each difficulty level significantly differed from all others (all p’s < 0.001), with a rapid decline of mean accuracy from 0.95 accuracy rate in the easy category to 0.07 accuracy rate in the very hard category. Power analysis of the silhouette task indicated that with our sample size and effect size estimation, we had sufficient power to detect a significant main effect (power = 0.99).

Bottom Line: In the present study we investigate hemispheric processing of conventional and unconventional visual stimuli in the context of visual and verbal creative ability.In Experiment 1, we studied two unconventional visual recognition tasks-Mooney face and objects' silhouette recognition-and found a significant relationship between measures of verbal creativity and unconventional face recognition.Our findings demonstrate the role of the non-specialized hemisphere in processing unconventional stimuli and how it relates to creativity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Leslie and Susan Gonda (Goldschmied) Multidisciplinary Brain Research Center, Bar-Ilan University Ramat-Gan, Israel.

ABSTRACT
In the present study we investigate hemispheric processing of conventional and unconventional visual stimuli in the context of visual and verbal creative ability. In Experiment 1, we studied two unconventional visual recognition tasks-Mooney face and objects' silhouette recognition-and found a significant relationship between measures of verbal creativity and unconventional face recognition. In Experiment 2 we used the split visual field (SVF) paradigm to investigate hemispheric processing of conventional and unconventional faces and its relation to verbal and visual characteristics of creativity. Results showed that while conventional faces were better processed by the specialized right hemisphere (RH), unconventional faces were better processed by the non-specialized left hemisphere (LH). In addition, only unconventional face processing by the non-specialized LH was related to verbal and visual measures of creative ability. Our findings demonstrate the role of the non-specialized hemisphere in processing unconventional stimuli and how it relates to creativity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus