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Haemonchotolerance in West African Dwarf goats: contribution to sustainable, anthelmintics-free helminth control in traditionally managed Nigerian dwarf goats.

Chiejina SN, Behnke JM, Fakae BB - Parasite (2015)

Bottom Line: Here, we summarise the history of this breed and explain its economic importance in rural West Africa.If haemonchotolerance can be shown to be genetically controlled, it should be possible to exploit the underlying genes to improve GIN resistance among productive fibre and milk producing breeds of goats, most of which are highly susceptible to nematode infections.Either introgression of resistance alleles into susceptible breeds by conventional breeding, or transgenesis could be used to develop novel parasite-resistant, but highly productive breeds, or to improve the resistance of existing breeds, benefitting the local West African rural economy as well as global caprine livestock agriculture.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria.

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Worm burden in concurrent infections with H. contortus and T. brucei in Nigerian WAD goats from the humid zone. Animals were segregated into low and high FEC producers, following escalating (immunising) infections, as described in the legend to Figure 4. All the animals were treated with an anthelmintic (fenbendazole) on day 61 (d61) to remove the escalating (immunising) infection and then half of each group or FEC phenotype (9 goats in each, total = 18) were infected with 50 × 106 trypanosomes (Tryp +ve, animals). The other half remained trypanosome-naive (No tryps). Seven days later, on d68, all the animals (n = 36) were challenged with 3000 L3 of H. contortus. The figure shows that in those animals which harboured heavy worm infections initially, based on FEC (the high FEC phenotype) prior to anthelmintic abbreviation of immunising infections, subsequent challenge with H. contortus and concurrent infection with T. brucei, resulted in significantly heavier worm burdens compared with similarly treated animals, which produced initially only low FEC. This shows that the trypanosome-elicited increase in worm burdens was confined to the high FEC (poor responder) goats. The y-axis indicates the value of the mean worm burden of relevant groups. For further details see Chiejina et al. [16].
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Figure 8: Worm burden in concurrent infections with H. contortus and T. brucei in Nigerian WAD goats from the humid zone. Animals were segregated into low and high FEC producers, following escalating (immunising) infections, as described in the legend to Figure 4. All the animals were treated with an anthelmintic (fenbendazole) on day 61 (d61) to remove the escalating (immunising) infection and then half of each group or FEC phenotype (9 goats in each, total = 18) were infected with 50 × 106 trypanosomes (Tryp +ve, animals). The other half remained trypanosome-naive (No tryps). Seven days later, on d68, all the animals (n = 36) were challenged with 3000 L3 of H. contortus. The figure shows that in those animals which harboured heavy worm infections initially, based on FEC (the high FEC phenotype) prior to anthelmintic abbreviation of immunising infections, subsequent challenge with H. contortus and concurrent infection with T. brucei, resulted in significantly heavier worm burdens compared with similarly treated animals, which produced initially only low FEC. This shows that the trypanosome-elicited increase in worm burdens was confined to the high FEC (poor responder) goats. The y-axis indicates the value of the mean worm burden of relevant groups. For further details see Chiejina et al. [16].

Mentions: Correlations between total worm burden at necropsy and mean faecal egg counts (rs = 0.563, n = 32, P = 0.001) of goats during challenge infection with H. contortus in the experiment described in Figure 8. The best-fit line was calculated by least squares methods and is given only to guide the eye.


Haemonchotolerance in West African Dwarf goats: contribution to sustainable, anthelmintics-free helminth control in traditionally managed Nigerian dwarf goats.

Chiejina SN, Behnke JM, Fakae BB - Parasite (2015)

Worm burden in concurrent infections with H. contortus and T. brucei in Nigerian WAD goats from the humid zone. Animals were segregated into low and high FEC producers, following escalating (immunising) infections, as described in the legend to Figure 4. All the animals were treated with an anthelmintic (fenbendazole) on day 61 (d61) to remove the escalating (immunising) infection and then half of each group or FEC phenotype (9 goats in each, total = 18) were infected with 50 × 106 trypanosomes (Tryp +ve, animals). The other half remained trypanosome-naive (No tryps). Seven days later, on d68, all the animals (n = 36) were challenged with 3000 L3 of H. contortus. The figure shows that in those animals which harboured heavy worm infections initially, based on FEC (the high FEC phenotype) prior to anthelmintic abbreviation of immunising infections, subsequent challenge with H. contortus and concurrent infection with T. brucei, resulted in significantly heavier worm burdens compared with similarly treated animals, which produced initially only low FEC. This shows that the trypanosome-elicited increase in worm burdens was confined to the high FEC (poor responder) goats. The y-axis indicates the value of the mean worm burden of relevant groups. For further details see Chiejina et al. [16].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4321401&req=5

Figure 8: Worm burden in concurrent infections with H. contortus and T. brucei in Nigerian WAD goats from the humid zone. Animals were segregated into low and high FEC producers, following escalating (immunising) infections, as described in the legend to Figure 4. All the animals were treated with an anthelmintic (fenbendazole) on day 61 (d61) to remove the escalating (immunising) infection and then half of each group or FEC phenotype (9 goats in each, total = 18) were infected with 50 × 106 trypanosomes (Tryp +ve, animals). The other half remained trypanosome-naive (No tryps). Seven days later, on d68, all the animals (n = 36) were challenged with 3000 L3 of H. contortus. The figure shows that in those animals which harboured heavy worm infections initially, based on FEC (the high FEC phenotype) prior to anthelmintic abbreviation of immunising infections, subsequent challenge with H. contortus and concurrent infection with T. brucei, resulted in significantly heavier worm burdens compared with similarly treated animals, which produced initially only low FEC. This shows that the trypanosome-elicited increase in worm burdens was confined to the high FEC (poor responder) goats. The y-axis indicates the value of the mean worm burden of relevant groups. For further details see Chiejina et al. [16].
Mentions: Correlations between total worm burden at necropsy and mean faecal egg counts (rs = 0.563, n = 32, P = 0.001) of goats during challenge infection with H. contortus in the experiment described in Figure 8. The best-fit line was calculated by least squares methods and is given only to guide the eye.

Bottom Line: Here, we summarise the history of this breed and explain its economic importance in rural West Africa.If haemonchotolerance can be shown to be genetically controlled, it should be possible to exploit the underlying genes to improve GIN resistance among productive fibre and milk producing breeds of goats, most of which are highly susceptible to nematode infections.Either introgression of resistance alleles into susceptible breeds by conventional breeding, or transgenesis could be used to develop novel parasite-resistant, but highly productive breeds, or to improve the resistance of existing breeds, benefitting the local West African rural economy as well as global caprine livestock agriculture.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus